Instrument training

DaPaul

New Member
I'm starting my instrument next week. I'd like to fly almost every day until completion. I want to hear about experiences others have had with condensed training. I already have the written done with a 97%.
thank for any replies
 

mastermags

Well-Known Member *giggity*
I am also planning on starting in a couple of months, and Im trying to get my written done... do you feel like you are well ahead of the game?
 

mtsu_av8er

Well-Known Member
I did my instrument training over about 3 weeks, I guess (too lazy to break out the logbook). It can be done in alot lees time than that, with a few conditions already being met.

How much cross country, PIC time do you have? How much simulated instrument time? Although you could do it, I'd hate to try to cram 50 hours of flying into two or three weeks.

The total immersion concept works really well, but there are some other things to consider. For example, if you take 6 months to get your instrument rating, you're going to have most of the information burned deep in your memory for the rest of your life. If you get your rating in 3 weeks, the same won't be so. It's going to take alot of effort on your part to keep the same level of currency (initially). After you've gained some experience in the system, however, the end result is the same.

I'd say go for it, if you're going to be able to follow up with alot of practical, real-world experience. I'm a fan of condensed training - my biggest problem is finding an instructor that's willing to do it!!
 

kellwolf

Piece of Trash
It's taken me over a year to get my instrument b/c 1. I needed the XC time and 2. Money doesn't grow on trees. I've spent so long going over these things that I've had some of the pilots at work ask me about obscure things they've forgotten.
 

MQAAord

Scheherazade
Staff member
I did my PPL as a 'condensed' program. 4 weeks from start to finish. It really was the way to go because everything stays so fresh in your mind. I flew twice a day for 4 days a week, the other days (and every evening) I reviewed & studied. Basically just be prepared to be totally immersed in flying, don't plan on doing any other 'projects' around the house or anything. Just keep your mind on what you're doing, and what your instructor tells you to study & review every night.

I loved my condensed program, I hope I can do my instrument & commercial the same way!
 

kellwolf

Piece of Trash
I wish I could do that, but I ain't gots the funds. If I did, I would have no problem flying every day.
 

E_Dawg

Moderator
If you want to minimize training time (and cost), remember that you only need 15 hours of training from a CFII... the remaining 25 hours can be done with a safety pilot.

Sooo, to really cut costs you can go up with a CFII, get the basics of BAI down, then do some of your 50 XC time under the hood with a safety pilot, then go back to the CFII and work on IFR XC procedures, then finish up the training by doing the IFR XC just as you hit 50 hrs XC.
 

DE727UPS

Well-Known Member
Also, you can do up to 20 hours in a ground trainer such as an ATC610. 10 hours can be done on an FAA approved PCATD. I own both and would recommend 10 in a PCATD and 10 in the ATC610...the rest in the aircraft.
 

DakotaBlue

New Member
for me personally i would say when i went through it i just put my head down and ran...keep going until you feel confused then slow down...you need to have every thing down pat to build on top of it...just my personal opinion though
 

UA_Wildcat

Well-Known Member
I am starting my Instrument in a few weeks and will be taking it 141 to save money and hopefully time. Does anyone have any good feedback about how to expedite the program?
 

PhotoPilot

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
I am starting my Instrument in a few weeks and will be taking it 141 to save money and hopefully time. Does anyone have any good feedback about how to expedite the program?

[/ QUOTE ]

Eat, breath, and sleep IFR!
I just finished mine in about 5 weeks (after accounting for a week out of town during the holidays) at a 141 school and found the 'full immersion' and 5 week pace were just about perfect. I also lucked out: my instructor had another student who was at the same training point as I was (both of us in the twins as well). We flew twice per day and rode with the other person twice as well. 3 to 4 days per week, we were either flying or riding on 4 instruction flights per day. Seeing someone else make the same mistakes I was making but from a non-flying position was an excellent learning experience. If you can backseat with other IFR students, go for it! I also happened into the perfect time of year to do the IFR portion of my training. Our icing levels are usually at least a few thousand feet higher than we were flying and half of our flights were at least partially in actual IMC. I racked up 10 hours of actual and it was great experience.

One last tip, though it may seem obvious: Keep reviewing the private pilot information during your instrument training. Don't get so consumed by IFR tunnel vision that you neglect the other equally important areas of knowledge for safe flight. I think that this is even more crucial if you did you PPL as part of a full-time, condensed program just prior to the instrument training.

Good luck!
 

DE727UPS

Well-Known Member
Besides the 50XC hours, how does 141 save money? How much are you planning on spending on your IFR?
 

UA_Wildcat

Well-Known Member
Actually I don't know how much I am planning on spending? As little as possible... of course LOL. Living here in PDX I have to plan my training around our wx and lack of daylight. I was thinking I could get through the 141 faster and make the time up during the summer while getting my commercial. There will be many more opportunities to fly this summer...I hope?
 

rhs

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
Actually I don't know how much I am planning on spending? As little as possible... of course LOL. Living here in PDX I have to plan my training around our wx and lack of daylight. I was thinking I could get through the 141 faster and make the time up during the summer while getting my commercial. There will be many more opportunities to fly this summer...I hope?

[/ QUOTE ]

Lack of daylight? Are you flying out of an unlighted field? Night is one of the best times to fly under the hood because it's much more difficult to peek!
 

hokiepilot

Well-Known Member
I got my ticket in about 10 days out in AZ. In retrospect I probably would've rather spaced it out over a couple weeks. Remember what it was like in college studying your butt off craming for a test? Now think back and remember how easy it was to loose that knowledge if you didn't use it often (my fault I know)!

DW
 

RiddlePilot

New Member
I wouldn't be so gung-ho about going so quickly. I did mine in a total of about 18 weeks (single and multi requirements), and by the end I was burned out beyond belief.
 
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