I want to fly.

Amin

New Member
Hello, this is my first post here. I luckily stumbled onto this forum today and I feel more confident about everything even after being here for only a few hours.

I'm 21 and in my second year of college in NYC (Hunter) majoring in physics. Flying's been one of those dreams I had as a kid. I brushed it off and went on with life, thinking the dream would fade away. It hasn't. I'm about 99.99 percent certain about doing this. I've flown an introductory flight and became more confident about my decision.

I've looked at Vaughn college to transfer to, which looks good but is pretty expensive for just a CFI rating after you graduate. My question to you guys is, what do I do? Should I stay in my current school and attend ground school on the side? Or is going to Vaughn not a crazy idea? My ultimate goal is to fly for a major carrier (of course), but I realistically want to fly for hire ASAP.
 

SFCC/UND

Well-Known Member
get your medical first and I would stay at a community college for two years and find a cheap FBO and pay as you go. Keep your options open, there are a lot of aviation jobs out there. You might find yourself liking cargo more than airlines.
 

jspeed87

Well-Known Member
Hello, this is my first post here. I luckily stumbled onto this forum today and I feel more confident about everything even after being here for only a few hours.

I'm 21 and in my second year of college in NYC (Hunter) majoring in physics. Flying's been one of those dreams I had as a kid. I brushed it off and went on with life, thinking the dream would fade away. It hasn't. I'm about 99.99 percent certain about doing this. I've flown an introductory flight and became more confident about my decision.

I've looked at Vaughn college to transfer to, which looks good but is pretty expensive for just a CFI rating after you graduate. My question to you guys is, what do I do? Should I stay in my current school and attend ground school on the side? Or is going to Vaughn not a crazy idea? My ultimate goal is to fly for a major carrier (of course), but I realistically want to fly for hire ASAP.
Welcome fellow neighbor, I'm from New Jersey. I would stay away from vaughn it's expensive. Check out Essex County Airport in New Jersey. Plenty of good schools their.
 

slushie

C56X ATP CFII MEI
Unless "expensive" doesn't mean anything to you, finish up where you're at. Do the flight training outside of a university.
 

esa17

Well-Known Member
My younger brother is about to graduate with a degree in physics and mechanical engineering. He has gotten quite a few very interesting job offers since he's a commercial pilot about to finish his CFI. He'll have a great career in aviation and never deal with the headaches and won't have nearly the uncertainty some of our other flying brethren have. Finish that physics degree at all costs then focus on the flying, do that in the summers if you wish, but finish that degree. You won't be sorry.
 

azaviator08

New Member
If I had to do it all over again I would have gotten a different major other than Aviation Science. Even though I know it's what I will do for the rest of my life (well something aviation related). I would have rather gotten a business degree of some sort. But theres always an MBA.

Anyways get your degree in physics since you have to like it somewhat or else you wouldnt have started it in the beginning. Then get your rating on the side at an FBO. A lot of times at these FBO's you will find older flight instructors who have been doing this for a loooonnng time. I've learned a lot from these guys!;)
 

CaptBill

Well-Known Member
Welcome Amin. You will find many great personalities and resources here at JC. Ask lots of questions and you will get perspective from a wide variety of guys and girls who know what they are talking about. I can't imagine finding a better site to visit for anyone just starting out in aviation. Good luck with your new career choice. :)
 

Realms09

Well-Known Member
Pursue flying in your current situation. Intro flights are great, but maybe you should get your private certificate before saying YES! to flying as a career and lifestyle. My personal recommendation is to start out in gliders - most likely you'll have a blast doing it and learn a lot about the basics of flying. Also, before making hasty decisions spend some time absorbing the great resource Doug has created here. It can't be processed in one day.

Physics is a great choice for a degree (if you like it). You will have a much better understanding of how airplanes work as a result of it, and it is a nice spring board into graduate work in a variety sciences and engineering if you want to continue after your B.S.

Good luck pursuing your dreams!
 

Bandit_Driver

Gold Member
Welcome to the board. <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
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With as crazy as this industry is, it definitely would behoove you to finish your degree and learn to fly on the side. This will save you money and give you options. You should always have something to fall back on to in case you can't get hired immediately or worse get furloughed later on.<o:p></o:p>
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Good luck and don't be afraid to ask questions here. As CalCapt said, there is a lot of experience on the board and we are here to help.<o:p></o:p>
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Good luck.<o:p></o:p>
 

Amin

New Member
Thanks for the advice everyone. I'm going to finish this degree and do flight training on the side. Is 24-25 too late to start working?
 

VATechPilot

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the advice everyone. I'm going to finish this degree and do flight training on the side. Is 24-25 too late to start working?
Think of it this way...would you rather start an aviation profession in your mid to late 20s with little to no debt, or start a few years earlier with a good amount of debt? Its a tough decision, but it seems to me that regardless of what you decide, it's never too late to enter into this profession. There's a number pilots on here who did not enter until their 30s or later and seem to be quite content.
 

Bandit_Driver

Gold Member
Don't worry, it isn't too late. I didn't start my flight training until I was 24 and got my first flying job at 28. There have been several people on here that made the switch to aviation in their 40's and I believe we have one gentlemen that switched around 50.
 

Sheblerep

New Member
I would agree with everyone else. Complete the degree first, then focus on the flying. You will need something to pay the bills and pay for flight time and a good job as a physicist may just work. It is very expensive training to undertake and you should be prepared to spend $34k-$35k before you start getting paid for it, and even then, not paid much.

I am glad to hear that you found your passion and you shouldn't let anything as small as money stop you from achieving your dreams and goals. Sorry, sounded a lot less corny before I typed it.
 

spilot

Well-Known Member
Some of the best resources available are on the faa.gov website for free. and those books will cover everything you'll be required to know according to the PTS, so you don't really need to buy the Jeppesen corporation's overpriced products.
 

surreal1221

Well-Known Member
Welcome to the forum, lots of great people and great information.

Here's my suggestion.

Finish your physics degree, and learn to fly on the side. That way you don't pay some ridiculously expensive college tuition just so you can learn to fly through them, and can instead go to a mom and pop FBO and learn to fly that way. Second, you'll have a non-aviation related formal education that you can fall back on should you need to use it (furlough, lose of medical, etc).

Good luck.
 

skydog

New Member
You want to fly, that's great. Now answer this

Do you want to be spend the rest of your career living out of a suitcase and spending 3 or 4 nights a week in some hotel somewhere?

Do you want to regularly put in 14 hour duty days?

Do you want to take a checkride and a medical exam every six months (failure of either means the end of your career)?

Do you want to miss weekends and holidays with your family?

Do you want to always be on call 24/7/365?

Do you want to get laid off, let go, and have to start over 2 or 3 times in your career?

All of the above are things that the eager young space cadets never seem to think about when they decide that they want to fly. These are also the things that the average pilot will experience in their career. Still want to fly?

If so, then forget about flying and finish school. Get a good job. THEN, start taking those flying lessons. Do NOT take on debt.

In the meantime, do the following:

1) Start following the aviation business news. If you're going to be part of this business, then understand how the business works. Flying airplanes is great fun, but the people who's airplanes you will be flying aren't in the business for fun. They're in it to make money. Understanding how they make money in the business will help you better understand your role in that business.

2) Read the following books: "Hard Landing" by Thomaz Petzinger, and "Flying the Line" by George Hopkins. Commercial aviation ain't all hugs and puppies.

3) Allow yourself to consider options outside of aviation. Too many people convince themselves that they won't be happy doing anything else. In my opinion, these people have no imagination. They're are lots of ways to make a satisfying and fulfilling living in this world.
 
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