How soon do you know your next month's line?

ThatOtherDude

New Member
Here at Colgan it's usually past the 20th. Is that about the same as your airline? Seems like they can figure it out a lot sooner.

Sorry if it's been discussed.
 
Depends CA's are around 10-12 days in or so and FO's are around middle of the month, this month it's the 16th.
 
Eagle- usual is bid open 15th through 20th at noon.. results 20th after 2pm.
 
Bids open the 2nd tuesday of the month and close a week later. Then we have six days of step trading to rectify problems or try to upgrade your trips.
 
If I remember correctly Express bids would go in on something like the 10th and you get the results about an hour after the bid closes. Secondary lines (relief/reserve lines) would go in maybe a week later and again, you end up with your results about an hour after the bid closes.

It's a computer program that does all the shuffling, it could really in theory be out in 30 seconds, but it always seemed to take about an hour.
 
Usually on the 19th at SkyWest. Sometimes the 20th. Composite lines and reconciliations are published on the 24th.
 
Colgan is getting better. Its pretty much all automated now, so the second the bid period closes, they can go in and see what people got.

For the Saab NE we got our tentative awards a few days ago, and on Monday they get finalized.

To check out your tentative, just log into Crewweb and go to awards. I was shocked to see ours up so soon. It def makes planning much easier.
 
Colgan is getting better. Its pretty much all automated now, so the second the bid period closes, they can go in and see what people got.

For the Saab NE we got our tentative awards a few days ago, and on Monday they get finalized.

To check out your tentative, just log into Crewweb and go to awards. I was shocked to see ours up so soon. It def makes planning much easier.

:D:D:D
 
We bid by trips, not lines, so our trips come out on the 12th, bidding closes on the 16th and schedules come out on the 19th. Schedule "upgrading" opens on the 23rd.
 
It's a computer program that does all the shuffling, it could really in theory be out in 30 seconds, but it always seemed to take about an hour.

We use a computer program too (and are about 1/5th the size of Express) but it still takes them 3 days to get the lines published.

For us, the first round (all the hard lines) come out on the 18th, the second round (build up and reserve lines) come out on the 24th and then trades and improvments (which really don't happen) occure on the 28th.
 
Bidding for us is the 15th-20th. If you're a line holder, you'll probably know your schedule at noon on the 21st. If your RSV, you'll know what your days off are on the 21st at noon. Could be as late as the 24th for you to know the breakdown of RRA, RRP, RRL, PM RSV and AM RSV. I'm NOT a fan of our current RSV system since if you're awarded a RSV line, your seniority basically goes away. Doesn't matter if your dead last on RSV or most senior RSV since nothing in the contract under PBS forces scheduling to do ANYTHING in seniority order. It's all "best effort" and "company necessity" language. Under paper bidding, it was WAY different....and better.
 
Delta

Bids: 5th/0800 to 12th/0800

Results: Official NLT than 17th/1800 (sometimes available earlier)

Hey Mr. PBS! Why didn't you give me a call last month and warn me about "denial mode"? :) Just kidding bro!
 
Lines are out on the 18th or so (depending on if the "customer" shifts some flying at the last minute) to give our scheduling committee time to vet the lines for contractual issues.

Bids close on the 24th and awards on the 25th.
 
The bid packet is supposed to be out on the 17th (usually later). The bid awards are out on the 21st and the final master main is supposed to be available on the 27th.
 
This was always one of my frustrations with this industry. I never understood why a schedule couldn't be published a month or two out. It's not like the airlines decide in the middle of this month what their flight schedules are going to be at the beginning of the next month. Airlines put tickets for sale several months ahead of time.They can't do that unless they know when/where they are flying.

Another one of my frustrations was the inequity in line construction. On the same equipment/status/base there would be some lines with 70 hours and 16 days off, while others had 90 hours and 12 days off. Seemed to me that all lines should have been built as an averge (i.e. 80 hours and 14 days off), if for no other reason than it's the most efficient utiliation of resources.
 
This was always one of my frustrations with this industry. I never understood why a schedule couldn't be published a month or two out. It's not like the airlines decide in the middle of this month what their flight schedules are going to be at the beginning of the next month. Airlines put tickets for sale several months ahead of time.They can't do that unless they know when/where they are flying.


For majors, I could see this. For regionals....who knows. Delta juggles our block hours with all the other DCI carriers, so management rarely has an accurate guess of the flight schedule a month in advance. Then you have to build the pairings based on that schedule. Then you have to publish the pairings and the bid pack, close the bid and award the lines. Honestly, I think it could be done sooner than the 21st of the month, but a month in advance for a regional that doesn't get accurate flight schedules from the mainline partners isn't realistic.
 
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