How hard is it to land a job as a new CFI?

Leilani_flt

New Member
Thinking ahead in terms of where to continue training (trying to go ahead and finish up my instrument locally, but as far as commercial and CFI, do most places prefer to hire their own grads?)

How hard is it to get a CFI job as a rookie someplace other than where you trained? Are certain types of schools more likely to consider you than others (i.e. an FBO vs. an academy or college with an aviation program)?

Thank-you so much for your input! Livin's easy around here and local aviators are awesome, but I do want to experience other parts of the country...
 

Douglas

Old School KSUX
times are tough at some places.
I only know of one shop that won't hire a green instructor.
Most are more than happy to hire their own.

It shouldn't be too tough to get a job if you are willing to move. If you want to stay at your location, then you will just need to wait until they need you, whenever that maybe.
Good luck
 

mhcasey

Well-Known Member
It shouldn't be too tough to get a job if you are willing to move. If you want to stay at your location, then you will just need to wait until they need you, whenever that maybe.
Good luck
Really? Have you looked at the Job Postings forum lately? I was reluctant to move initially and now I'm hozed. 700tt with ~400 dual given and I can't find an instructing gig anywhere right now...including Iraq.

OP: Take your time with training and hopefully things will shape up before too long. I'd recommend getting your CFI where you hope to instruct...Would also recommend combining commercial/CFI training to save money.
 

b3181981

Well-Known Member
OP: Take your time with training and hopefully things will shape up before too long. I'd recommend getting your CFI where you hope to instruct...Would also recommend combining commercial/CFI training to save money.
how do you combine comm/cfi? I thought cfi was mostly ground work.
 

primate

New Member
what do you mean by that
Part of the transition to CFI is flying from the right seat. Believe it or not, it can be a little difficult to get used to things like landings, steep turns, and other maneuvers from the right seat, since up until now, you have flow exclusively sitting on the left side.

So, if during your commercial training, you can convince them to let you fly from the right seat, then theoretically, you will reduce the amount of time in the airplane when working on the CFI.

Personally, I don't think you're going to save much money doing it that way. Once you have your commercial & can do the maneuvers, then you are probably competent to do them from the right side also. Landings are a little different, but just remember to put that centerline between the seats, and you'll do okay.

And you're right, CFI is mostly bookwork that you can do yourself if properly motivated.

Good luck !
 

Douglas

Old School KSUX
IMO - You are not going to save much by doing your commercial right seat.
right seat only takes a few flight to get used to.

Also, you need to check out what your schools insurance says about solo right seat flying.
There are many places that do not allow that.
 

mhcasey

Well-Known Member
Not just flying...combine ground/studying. Look at the PTS for Commercial and compare it to CFI. Not a whole lot of differences save the endorsements and FOI. At my school we taught lesson plans for everything in the CFI PTS and were signed off for commercial after that. If you can teach it all, you'll know it for the commercial checkride. Practicing the teaching was a big help too.
 

bdhill1979

Gone West
Not just flying...combine ground/studying. Look at the PTS for Commercial and compare it to CFI. Not a whole lot of differences save the endorsements and FOI. At my school we taught lesson plans for everything in the CFI PTS and were signed off for commercial after that. If you can teach it all, you'll know it for the commercial checkride. Practicing the teaching was a big help too.
:yeahthat: I did my CSEL in the right seat. Best decision I ever made.

As to the original question;

I just helped a guy get job at a place one of my former students is a CFI at. The place was not "Hiring" at the time. But when they needed someone they started asking people they knew, not taking resumes.

I think present conditions will make those personal connections very valuable in getting a job. Employers are taking fewer and are therefore being much more selective.

As you go through training think about that, go meet people, keep contacts fresh, and network with all the schools in your area, not just the one you happened to go to. I think that will help you land a job better than any resume.
 

youngpilot85

New Member
Very true bdhill1979. Just to add on to what you're talking about in terms of networking, what you also find happening a lot are resumes being walked in by someone you personally know, who can also put in a good word for you. Even better is if this person is in good standing with the company himself. You just can't give up, especially in times like this...
 

beechpilot

Well-Known Member
I combined my commercial and CFI for the simple reason that I did it part 61 and therefore needed 250 hours. So, when I hit the 250 I was ready for both checkrides. I did all of my training right seat and to this day I've yet to do a chandelle or lazy eight from the left seat.

I remember that first time I flew right seat......and how bad that first landing was. But, as other have said, it takes probably 3 hours or so to get used to it. I still prefer the left seat though.
 

SFCC/UND

Well-Known Member
I don't think it was that hard to transition from the left seat to the right. Maybe because the airplane I flew always liked to crab to the left and all I had to do is tap a little right rudder and presto.
 

S.T.Aviator

Well-Known Member
:yeahthat: I did my CSEL in the right seat. Best decision I ever made.

As to the original question;

I just helped a guy get job at a place one of my former students is a CFI at. The place was not "Hiring" at the time. But when they needed someone they started asking people they knew, not taking resumes.

I think present conditions will make those personal connections very valuable in getting a job. Employers are taking fewer and are therefore being much more selective.

As you go through training think about that, go meet people, keep contacts fresh, and network with all the schools in your area, not just the one you happened to go to. I think that will help you land a job better than any resume.

I agree completely, NETWORK, NETWORK, NETWORK!
"It's not what you know , but who you know" is so true in this industry.
In Sept I was visiting NorCal and went up for a sightseeing flight. Took
the CFI available at that time since I was not checked out on their aircraft. The guy turned out to be a real nice person and we hit it off well. He applauded my landing and I told me I was a good stick. Then he mentioned to me that he was moving to a new school in the area teaching Asian contract students and that he would be their new Chief CFI resonsible for hiring and what not. I have kept in touch with him and he has basically gauranteed me a job when I finish up my ratings. He told me
that from observing my flying skills and my "friendly" personality he could see that I would be a good fit for the school. Funny how life works out some times eh!
 
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