How does one become an FAA check pilot?

flyboy03

New Member
Hey ive been thinking lateley on other flying careers other than airlines. Ive been wondering how you go about working for the FAA, you know the guys that give checkrides. Are there strict requirments for that? Is it as hard or hard to get on with an airline? Any of you guys got any other ideas for flying careers not with an airline?
 

braidkid

New Member
Hey, cool idea...
I'm not sure but I think you have to be "appointed" by the FAA in order to become a designated examiner. Examiners usually have tons of flight experience and have really contributed greatly to aviation in some form or other.
 

aviator

New Member
Normally these guys are ex-chief pilots from airlines or flight schools. The amount of expierence you need is enormous.

Unless you are talking about a 141 check airmen (thats different)
 

CaliforniaSurfer

Well-Known Member
Flyboy,

there was an article about that very topic in AOPA Flight Training about two months ago. Check aopa.org and look for back issues, if you're an AOPA member.

Good luck

Surf
 

davetheflyer

New Member
There are two types of guys who give checkrides.

One is a designated examiner (DE). In general, to be designated, you have to take a course in Oklahoma City, then wait for a vacancy in your area since the number of DEs is limited. DEs are not FAA employees.

The second is an FAA inspector. These guys work at the Flight Standards District Office (FSDO) or General Aviation District Office (GADO). The FAA web site used to list openings for these jobs, but I didn't see them when I just checked it.

Either way, you need to have clean record with ATP or commercial license and all CFI ratings.
 

PA44

New Member
To become an examiner you must take a written exam, followed by a FAA checkride(dont know what the req's are though, as far as hours or ratings) Then your put on a list in your local FSDO. There are only x number of examiners per FSDO, so it can be a very long wait.
 

HankHill

New Member
There is a good article by Dave Wilkerson in the FEB 2001 issue of AOPA flight training. Its about DPEs written by a DPE.

The Mirror Image pg 62

your should be able to access it from the archives at www.aopa.org
 

flyitup

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
There is a good article by Dave Wilkerson in the FEB 2001 issue of AOPA flight training. Its about DPEs written by a DPE.

The Mirror Image pg 62

your should be able to access it from the archives at www.aopa.org

[/ QUOTE ]

Does anyone know if this is THE Dave Wilkerson from Tulsa, Oklahoma?
 

Richman

JC’s Resident Curmudgeon
Hiya All,

The way it was explained to me is this:

You have to meet a certain experience level in terms of hours, PIC and so on, and these are outlined in the FAA inspectors handbook (emphasis is on CFI and dual given). They are not insurmountable, and anyone who has been in the industry a while should have them. My private was given to me by a guy whos real job was a high school physics teacher.

Then you go to the local FSDO and give them an "expression of interest" letter, that they keep on file.

If there becomes a need, and they pick you, you get sent to Oklahoma City for school, checkride etc. You then have to go to recurrent training and checkrides every year or so, and maintain a certain level of activity. At first you start out with the basic ratings (PVT) and can work yourself up, and your designation is only good for a certain region.

From what I'm told in reality is that it is a political process. You have to be a "known quantity" in the local aviation community. I guess that means you have to do your time at the various local seminars and be an active CFI/checkairman/aviation buisness owner. Lots of experience as a Part 121/135 checkairman or a Part 141 Stage Check Pilot would probably be very helpful, as that covers alot of the same procedures and paperwork. There also has to be a "need" for a new DE, and that means whatever the FAA wants it to mean.

Very best,
Rich
 
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