GPS inflight

jholloway_1

New Member
This has been on here before, but I couldn't find the post. I have a handheld GPS and I was wondering if I could use it on an airline flight. Obviously I would think that its not allowed, but I thought I remember someone saying that its legal. Just wondering, I'm flying out on monday, and would love to track our progress. Thanks for any input.
 

MQAAord

Scheherazade
Staff member
As of Sep 2002 (the date of my last flight with AA) GPS units were NOT on AA's approved electronic devices list. In fact they were specifically listed (along with cell phones and AM/FM radios) as not being allowed to use in flight! Check the airline's inflight magazine in the passenger information section, there will be a list of approved/non-approved devices. Also you can always ask a F/A if they are allowed.
 

Derg

New Arizona, Il Duce/Warlord
Staff member
I dunno!

I think they're approved, but I haven't been able to find a reference as such.

But, keep in mind that each airline has their own policy concerning the GPS recievers.
 

MQAAord

Scheherazade
Staff member
I searched American, Delta, United, Northwest, Continental, JetBlue, ATA, Southwest, & America West's websites, and only 2 of these airlines had anything at all to say about GPS units, (United & Continental had lists of devices, but GPS units were not on either the approved or non-approved lists)

From Delta's website:
You may not operate the following devices when the airplane is at the gate and the boarding door is closed. This restriction also applies during taxi, takeoff, initial climb, approach, or landing.

Personal computers
Personal computer peripheral devices
Personal digital assistants, except when taxiing to the gate
Personal computer games, except when taxiing to the gate
Compact disc players
Digital cassette tape player/recorders
Video recorder/playback systems
Calculators
GPS (global positioning satellite) systems, except when taxiing to the gate
Due to safety concerns, flight crew personnel may, at any time, ask you to turn off a personal electronic device.


From Southwest's website:
When indicated by Flight Attendant announcements, during the cruise phase of flight these devices may be operated: DVD, CD, and tape players, personal digital assistants (PDAs or hand-held computers), electronic calculators, hand held electronic games, electronic cameras, Global Positioning Satellite ( GPS ) receivers, and devices that compose e-mail or text messages without transmitting or receiving.
 

250blue

New Member
I used to use mine all the time on United Flights. I would take the antennae and suction it to the window. I was always discreet and never had a problem.
 

lilrkt

New Member
I can't understand why a GPS receiver would be a problem, when this is an instrument that is being used for flying, obviously does not interfere with other equipment, and has no capability to interfere with the flight environment. Of course I have not taken the time to learn how exactly all of the equipment receives it's information
, but it doesn't make good "off the top of the head" sense.
 

Tokyo007

Well-Known Member
hey I have a question..

I was thinking about going on a flight to seattle from salt lake city to check out the boeing plant on delta and I would LIKE to use this little $300 radio to listen in on the ATC.. but I think I already know the answer to this one.. most likely a no-no? Some of you pros fill me in.. is there a way to ask for them to play it on the coms in the seats or.. whats the best way?

the radio I have is a Icom a-23

Thanks,

Matthew
(new to the group - wanna be international airline pilot who's just a lowly instrument 150 hr. pilot)
 

SteveC

Really?
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]
.......who's just a lowly instrument 150 hr. pilot)

[/ QUOTE ]
The radio will be no-go.

By the way, "lowly" and "pilot" never go in the same sentence.
 

TrcB777

New Member
When I first got my GPS I used it on a Delta flight. No problems and its cool to see ground speeds 500+ kts.
 

aloft

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
I can't understand why a GPS receiver would be a problem, when this is an instrument that is being used for flying, obviously does not interfere with other equipment, and has no capability to interfere with the flight environment.

[/ QUOTE ]Pretty much all electronic devices emit some amount of radio frequency energy, whether they're an intended transmitter or not, so yes they DO have the capabiltiy to interfere with the flight environment (though it's a bit of a stretch). Practically speaking, it's highly unlikely that a portable GPS receiver would generate sufficient RF emissions to interfere with anything aboard the aircraft, but that's not really the point; the point is two-fold: a) anyone using a GPS in the passenger cabin is doing so purely for entertainment, and b) those lists of permitted equipment are written by lawyers who don't care about your being entertained. During the phases of flight where use of portable electronic devices is prohibited, the lawyers would rather you sat quietly but attentively, ready to follow any instructions the flight crew might give you in the event of an emergency.
 

MQAAord

Scheherazade
Staff member
As a general rule, if an electronic device is not specifically listed on the airline's 'approved' list, it will be considered not-approved, and you may be asked to turn it off.

Electronic devices are not allowed to be used during certain phases of flight, or in the case of some devices, not at all during the flight, because we really don't know exactly what might happen if they are being used. The testing that would be required to determine the safety of every and all devices, and combination of devices out there would take way too much time & money. What devices are safe, how many can safely be operated at the same time, what happens if everybody turns them on at the same time? There are just so many variables that the airlines have their policies in place to cover their butts. Please respect these policies! They are not in place to inconvienence you, they are in place, like many other policies (seat backs being up, baggage being stowed properly) for safety! I can't tell you how many times I was harrassed/yelled at/given attitude by people who thought I was just telling them to turn off their phones because I was picking on them or something. The flight attendants enforce the companies policies because it is their job to.

When my husband flew DC-9s for TWA he once heard someone's cell phone conversation coming through on the radio in flight. The guy said where he was sitting in the course of the conversation, and the crew busted him big time. He couldn't believe the pilots had been listening to him.

When in doubt, TURN IT OFF. Or, ask the flight attendants if it is okay to use. In the case of the hand-held you want to use, ask the pilots directly if you can us it. When you're boarding, ask to see the cockpit, while you're up there tell them you have this hand-held you'd like to use in flight and ask if it's okay.

edit:
Aloft made a great point about paying attention in the event of an emergency! Thank you!
 

Tokyo007

Well-Known Member
". Or, ask the flight attendants if it is okay to use. In the case of the hand-held you want to use, ask the pilots directly if you can us it. When you're boarding, ask to see the cockpit, while you're up there tell them you have this hand-held you'd like to use in flight and ask if it's okay."
________________________________________________

that's a good idea i'll probably do that - Would be fun to follow the crew from clearance to final listening on the radio with them


Matthew
 

SteveC

Really?
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]
". Or, ask the flight attendants if it is okay to use. In the case of the hand-held you want to use, ask the pilots directly if you can us it. When you're boarding, ask to see the pit, while you're up there tell them you have this hand-held you'd like to use in flight and ask if it's okay."
________________________________________________

that's a good idea i'll probably do that - Would be fun to follow the crew from clearance to final listening on the radio with them


Matthew

[/ QUOTE ]
I think that the quote above was refering to a handheld GPS, not handheld radio. Radios & tv's are not allowed to be used at any time on flights. At least I'm 99% sure of that.

You can still ask, though.
 

vipermcg

New Member
Does anyone know if listening to the AM/FM radio is allowed? I was flying a red-eye SLC-JFK last year and just to see what would happen, I switched my walkman from CD to FM. I was surprised to find out that I was actually listening to a country music station from somewhere in Wisconsin. I could hear the music pretty clearly. Would this affect the flight in any way?
 

mastermags

Well-Known Member *giggity*
[ QUOTE ]
hey I have a question..

I was thinking about going on a flight to seattle from salt lake city to check out the boeing plant on delta and I would LIKE to use this little $300 radio to listen in on the ATC.. but I think I already know the answer to this one.. most likely a no-no? Some of you pros fill me in.. is there a way to ask for them to play it on the coms in the seats or.. whats the best way?

the radio I have is a Icom a-23


[/ QUOTE ]

They actually should have one of those inflight radio stations (you know, the one that plugs into your armrest) that allows you to listen to ATC... the last few flights I've been on have had it.
 

FL270

New Member
The only airline out there that I know of that features the "from the cockpit" channel is United ... you can find ATC communications on Channel 9. No other airlines do it. Using a scanner inflight will prove difficult, as it will be forbidden by policy at most airlines. To the best of my knowledge, using a digital camera on the airplane is no problem. They'll probably want it stowed for takeoff and landing, but beyond that, take all the photos you want.

FL270
 
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