G-force question

WacoFan

Bigly
Reading the thread about doing rolls in rental aircraft has made me think of a question.

Can a small, light, accelerometer be place in rental aircraft that can neither be erased or made inoperable? Being able to check the maximum number of positive and negative G's prior to flying the airplane would certainly help your risk/reward decision if following people on the aforementioned thread that think it is neat to do aerobatics in non-certified rental and club aircraft. Just a thought - do they already have this?
 

Nick

Well-Known Member
Yes.

The planes that I did about fifteen hours of aerobatic instruction in had a g-meter with two needles. One you could reset by pressing the button in the center of the gauge. This was used to reset it after maneuvers if you wanted to use it for each one.

The other needle had to be reset by a mechanic. It measured the exact same thing but its purpose was to measure the highest and lowest load factor the airframe had seen since the last time a mechanic had seen the plane for inspection.
 

WacoFan

Bigly
Yes.

The planes that I did about fifteen hours of aerobatic instruction in had a g-meter with two needles. One you could reset by pressing the button in the center of the gauge. This was used to reset it after maneuvers if you wanted to use it for each one.

The other needle had to be reset by a mechanic. It measured the exact same thing but its purpose was to measure the highest and lowest load factor the airframe had seen since the last time a mechanic had seen the plane for inspection.
Yes, but my question was - is there a small one for airplanes in a traditional rental fleet - 150's, 172's etc. This would allow you to know if someone rented the plane and put undue stress on it by doing aerobatics.
 

TXaviator

Well-Known Member
note:

PATENT for Fixed-Installation G-Meter for GA Aircraft (mx serviceable only)

2008 - TXaviator - TM - C - R all that stuff.

great idea.

you may now pay me royalties for developing such a product.
 

Bumblebee

Commodore
note:

PATENT for Fixed-Installation G-Meter for GA Aircraft (mx serviceable only)

2008 - TXaviator - TM - C - R all that stuff.

great idea.

you may now pay me royalties for developing such a product.
your blood's gone to your head dude!
 

WacoFan

Bigly
note:

PATENT for Fixed-Installation G-Meter for GA Aircraft (mx serviceable only)

2008 - TXaviator - TM - C - R all that stuff.

great idea.

you may now pay me royalties for developing such a product.
DAMN! Another idea shot to hell. I feel like the guy who came up with intermittent windshield wipers.
 

Nick

Well-Known Member
Yes, but my question was - is there a small one for airplanes in a traditional rental fleet - 150's, 172's etc. This would allow you to know if someone rented the plane and put undue stress on it by doing aerobatics.
You could install the same kind in any plane you wanted to.

Normally are they installed in a 172? No, they are not. Hope that answers the question.
 

WacoFan

Bigly
It just never really occured to me before to have one of these. We had a G-meter in a Citabria that we used to rent long ago, but of course not in the normal airplanes of the fleet - 150's, 172's, etc. After reading the thread about renting a club airplane and doing a roll it began to make sense that a FBO or club should have some way to check the G-forces encountered by an airplane if some A-hole should go about doing unauthorized acro in a non-certified plane. It would also help the flight school identify a perpatrator of this offense and asses charges for a full structural inspection and any damage that may have occured.
 

Scandinavian13

New Member
If the Gs remained at 1 on a properly executed 1G roll, it wouldn't show up and it wouldn't matter. At 1G, the aircraft is receiving no more stress than usual.

It would, however show
if somebody screwed one up and overstressed the airplane it would, and that could save an innocent renters life
.
 
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