Experimental Call Sign

mjg407

Well-Known Member
I've been looking in the FARs and Aim, but what are the requirements for an experimental call sign... We are test flying our newest tanker conversion this week... so is it Experimental (N-number)? Anybody have a quick reference out there? Thanks.
 
R

Roger, Roger

Guest
91.319(d) says that when operating at a towered airport, you must advise tower of the experimental nature of your aircraft. That's the most I found. I know the guys I worked with typically made the calls something like this: "Experimental 5846V is an L39 10 miles south, 3000..." or "Experimental Jet 39DK ready to go 27".
 

mjg407

Well-Known Member
91.319(d) says that when operating at a towered airport, you must advise tower of the experimental nature of your aircraft. That's the most I found. I know the guys I worked with typically made the calls something like this: "Experimental 5846V is an L39 10 miles south, 3000..." or "Experimental Jet 39DK ready to go 27".
Thanks. Thanks Mojo
 

ntbjounin

Well-Known Member
i typically hear something like "kitfox 2194E ...." then if approache asks what a kitfox is they compare it's performance characteristics to something like A Piper Cub.
Then they get put into the system as EXP 2194E.... and are so called by the controller.
 

butt

New Member
When I was doing my training, there was a king air based on the field. One day they kept making radio calls as "experimental King Air 2344U departing the active", "experimental King Air 2344U turning crosswind", "experimental King Air 2344U turning downwind", "experimental King Air 2344U departing the pattern to the south". I kept wondering why the heck he was calling himself experimental. Later on I came to learn one of the radios was busted or something, which was non-MELable or something, and they had to ferry it over to another airport to get it fixed. They ended up having to get a special ferry permit, hence the experimental call sign. I thought it was a little silly to call a King Air with only one radio experimental, but thats they way it goes I guess.
 

NJA_Capt

Well-Known Member
I kept wondering why the heck he was calling himself experimental. Later on I came to learn one of the radios was busted or something, which was non-MELable or something, and they had to ferry it over to another airport to get it fixed. They ended up having to get a special ferry permit, hence the experimental call sign.
Sounds like someone misunderstood the use of experimental. We use ferry permits all the time, it does not require us to change to an experimental callsign. The only time you use the "experimental" sign (that I know of) is when the actual aircraft registration is an Experimental registration. As such, they would also be required to use a placard stating "THIS AIRCRAFT DOES NOT COMPLY WITH FEDERAL SAFETY REGULATIONS FOR STANDARD AIRCRAFT."
 

mjg407

Well-Known Member
Sounds like someone misunderstood the use of experimental. We use ferry permits all the time, it does not require us to change to an experimental callsign. The only time you use the "experimental" sign (that I know of) is when the actual aircraft registration is an Experimental registration. As such, they would also be required to use a placard stating "THIS AIRCRAFT DOES NOT COMPLY WITH FEDERAL SAFETY REGULATIONS FOR STANDARD AIRCRAFT."
not necessarily. we have to use it for our intial maintenance check flight after converting a military aircraft to a fire-tanker. After the FAA conformity inspection, we then become restricted category.
 

towhook

New Member
The idea is to convey your aircraft type to those you are communicating with. If you are a king air, then call yourself a king air. It best expresses your speed, limitations, and physical appearance. Doesn't matter if you only have one radio, are doing a test flight, or are on a ferry permit.
 

TXaviator

Well-Known Member
The idea is to convey your aircraft type to those you are communicating with. If you are a king air, then call yourself a king air. It best expresses your speed, limitations, and physical appearance. Doesn't matter if you only have one radio, are doing a test flight, or are on a ferry permit.

agreed. in my experience at aerobatic contests, i hear a mix of people using N number, aircraft type, and descriptive type on the CTAF... and the most useful one is when people say something like "red biplane entering downwind".... because a) i have no use or care for the N number, and b) i know exactly what im looking for... which if its a pitts s1... could be darn hard to spot!

at a facility with controllers or something like that, N number would be more appropriate.
 
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