Embraer Question

Baronman

Well-Known Member
I flew on an Embraer 145 about 2 weeks ago and noticed some "strakes" on the oatboard leading edge of the wing. I counted 3 or 4 of them, all equal in length extending about 12 inches out.

The aircraft doesn't have leading edge devices so that takes out the possiblity of them being some sort of rails or hinges. Can anyone identify them?
 

FalconCapt

New Member
Aloft is probably right... Were they above or below the wing? Most likely a device to tame the stall characteristics for certification.
 

Derg

New Arizona, Il Duce/Warlord
Staff member
vortilons.

If you need more info, one of my croanies is an Emb-145 CA for COex (displaced from mainline as a 737 FO at Continental).
 

sorrygottarunway

Well-Known Member
yeah that would be cool...

I've always been curious about the ERJ vs CRJ competition... ERJ "looks" faster, max cruise of 450kts, the CRJ-200 (also 50 seater) has a high cruise of 464kts... ok, I guess thats not much of a difference. But I always wonder how the regionals make that key decision between two aircraft with almost the same performance.

And yeah, what the heck are those yellow slits. If they were stall fences, would they not have to be above the wing? Does this have something to do with (I cringe to say this again) "swept-wing design" where at certain speed, airflow is not over but laterally down the wing?

Or maybe its just a place for the capt. to hang his coats...
 

FalconCapt

New Member
"Another interesting aerodynamic change from earlier modes of the B-767 is the addition of three vortilons under the leading edge of the outboard slats. During stall testing, Boeing found that stick forces were getting light near the stall, and that uncommanded roll at the stall would produce up to a 20-degree bank. Both characteristics were within certification tolerance, but with the addition of the vortilons, the flow separation problem near the stall was eliminated. Vortilons, found on aircraft from the LongEze homebuilt to the EMB-135/145, and now the B-767-400ER, can energize the airflow just enough to eliminate a potential problem."
 

aloft

New Member
Thanks FalconCapt...very cool. I learn something new here every day!

p.s., are you the same FalconCapt from flightinfo?
 
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