Emailing a resume

FlynRyan

Well-Known Member
I am currently working as a flight instructor at the same school that I got my ratings at. However I am starting to feel the need to leave and go work at a school closer to friends and family. What I was wondering is how should I go about contacting these schools that I could potentially work for? Should I call or email and find out if they are hiring first or should I just shoot them off a resume? If you guys think that I should just send a resume, how should I do it? As an attachment to an email with a quick tid bit about my interest in the body? Fax? Like I said I'm pretty clueless on this because after I finished all of my ratings, the school I was a student at hired me and gave me students the next day so any help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.
 

SIUav8er

Narcosis
I think the best thing to do is go into the flight school you want to work for and talk to them directly (with a resume in hand). If they have a wesite, check that out too.
 

tgrayson

New Member
should I just shoot them off a resume?
That's probably the least effective thing you could do. As the previous poster said, the best thing is to walk in and try to talk to someone. That way you're a real person. The phone is the next best thing, you're almost a real person. A resume isn't a real person and can be easily slid under stack of paper on the desk to deal with "later" or just tossed.
 

Jayrock

Well-Known Member
As others have said, don't email it. Put forth some due diligence and walk it in-hand it to the person that can give you the job.
 

TravDK

Well-Known Member
If you have to email...<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
<o:p></o:p>
Not all email software work nicely with each other. A lot of time spent formatting and making sure all looks pretty on your screen could completely fall apart on the other end. Avoid unnecessary indentation and new paragraphs.<o:p></o:p>
<o:p></o:p>
Some places/people will not open attachments fearing a virus.<o:p></o:p>
<o:p></o:p>
Many people still have the older Microsoft Word, if you send a resume in the 2007 version, they may not be able to open it, or again, the formatting will not be nice and ruin the professional look. I suggest sending both the cover letter and resume as an attachment in both versions of Word as well as putting your cover letter in body of the email.

<o:p></o:p>
 

germb747

Well-Known Member
If you have to email...<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
<o:p></o:p>
Not all email software work nicely with each other. A lot of time spent formatting and making sure all looks pretty on your screen could completely fall apart on the other end. Avoid unnecessary indentation and new paragraphs.<o:p></o:p>
<o:p></o:p>
Some places/people will not open attachments fearing a virus.<o:p></o:p>
<o:p></o:p>
Many people still have the older Microsoft Word, if you send a resume in the 2007 version, they may not be able to open it, or again, the formatting will not be nice and ruin the professional look. I suggest sending both the cover letter and resume as an attachment in both versions of Word as well as putting your cover letter in body of the email.

<o:p></o:p>
Better yet; use a program like pdf995 to convert it to a .pdf file first. Still, I'd say emailing an unsolicited resume is a sure fire way to get the "delete" button pushed on your message.
 

mtsu_av8er

Well-Known Member
If you have to email...ffice:eek:ffice" /><o>:p></o>:p>
<o>:p></o>:p>
Not all email software work nicely with each other. A lot of time spent formatting and making sure all looks pretty on your screen could completely fall apart on the other end. Avoid unnecessary indentation and new paragraphs.<o>:p></o>:p>
<o>:p></o>:p>
Some places/people will not open attachments fearing a virus.<o>:p></o>:p>
<o>:p></o>:p>
Many people still have the older Microsoft Word, if you send a resume in the 2007 version, they may not be able to open it, or again, the formatting will not be nice and ruin the professional look. I suggest sending both the cover letter and resume as an attachment in both versions of Word as well as putting your cover letter in body of the email.

<o>:p></o>:p>
Warning to all - NEVER work for a technologically STUPID employer. If they can't get a MS Word document opened, you shouldn't work for them.
 

MidlifeFlyer

Well-Known Member
Warning to all - NEVER work for a technologically STUPID employer. If they can't get a MS Word document opened, you shouldn't work for them.
Since there are a lot of technologically stupid employers out there, you might be missing a great opportunity.
 

Scandinavian13

New Member
The way I go with resumes is if it says "email resumes to" or "Contact John Smith" (and provides a hyperlink to his email), email it to them. Just don't put a receipt request on it. Initially, it was a good asset to emailing, until everyone got email. Now, some consider it to be asinine, or an annoyance.

Often, places ask that you email it to them because they're trying to hire a lot of people. They'd almost prefer not to see any of the people until they see their credentials. As to what kind of employer that makes them, I'll leave it up to you.

If it's a job requiring you to move and it isn't specific as to how to contact them, I'd fax it (if a fax number is provided referencing resumes), or mail it. With both of those options, I'd give them a call first, saying you're interested in being employed there and would like to send a resume. Many employers prefer knowing that the applicants aren't just papering the town.

I'll agree with everyone else, though, that, the best way to hand in a resume is in person, generally. They see your face, they see your effort and they see your appearance in general (which is a lot more important than some would think).
 
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