Diverting In Flight

I_Money

Moderator
A recent Saratoga Story - a jockey, owner, and trainer were flying on the owner's corporate jet from a race in Del Mar, to a race in Saratoga. An hour into the flight the jockey went up to offer the pilots a drink, and noticed on the display the route was to Fl. The jockey asked the pilots how long until they landed in NY - the pilots replied, well we are going to FL not NY. It turns out dispatch misheard Saratoga as Sarasota.

So how difficult would it be to divert? What would be involved? Pull out the plotter? Does the flight computer handle it all? What about charts, might you not have them?
 

PGT

Well-Known Member
IF they had the fuel (unlikely) punch it in the FMS and call up FSS.

Whether or not the company will allow it :)
 

Snuggle

Well-Known Member
A recent Saratoga Story - a jockey, owner, and trainer were flying on the owner's corporate jet from a race in Del Mar, to a race in Saratoga. An hour into the flight the jockey went up to offer the pilots a drink, and noticed on the display the route was to Fl. The jockey asked the pilots how long until they landed in NY - the pilots replied, well we are going to FL not NY. It turns out dispatch misheard Saratoga as Sarasota.

So how difficult would it be to divert?
Depends on the type of drink as well as other not so important things like fuel, aircraft, company policies, etc.
 

DE727UPS

Well-Known Member
I've done some serious diverts at UPS. ATC, at worst, will ask you why. "Company request" seems to make them happy. You need to talk to dispatch and verify fuel burn and alternates, but it's usually their idea in the first place, so it's no big deal.
 

ricecakecm

Well-Known Member
I've done some serious diverts at UPS. ATC, at worst, will ask you why. "Company request" seems to make them happy. You need to talk to dispatch and verify fuel burn and alternates, but it's usually their idea in the first place, so it's no big deal.
In the corporate arena, it's usually as simple as telling ATC you want to change your destination, they may ask why.

As for fuel, alternates, etc., it's as simple as looking at the fuel guages and maybe talking to FSS to check the weather at the new destination.
 

minitour

New Member
As was said, it's not too tough. Coordinate with dispatch if required and then "Center, N123 destination change to ____"

*direct to* *enter* *enter* Then at some point you'll want to see how the fuel situation is. Divert from there if necessary.

-mini
 

Orange Anchor

New Member
With FMC equipped aircraft, heading to the wrong nav point is not uncommon. Not frequent but still, not uncommon.

For instance, you can have intersections that sound the same but are spelled differently. There used to be two intersections, MAYSE and MAIZE, both were southwest of KPIT and enroute to KDFW, ATC would sometimes clear you direct to MAIZE. The problem was both were close enough that you would not notice that much of a difference in track until ATC said, "ABC123, where are YOU GOING?"

For that reason, many aviators will ask for a phonetic spelling of any intersection that is not on their current route. It saves filling out a NASA.
 
Top