Dispatch Testing question

Opsflunkie

Active Member
Hello all I am new here, however I have browsed the forums for quite some time and had a question to ask. I currently work in airline operations, and I am about to graduate with a bachelors in aviation management. While obtaining these classes I have gained a vast intrest in flight dispatching. I have taken courses dealing with, flight meteorology, crew scheduling, aerodynamics, national aerospace etc. I am also currently taking flight lessons. I have been reading the requirements to become a flight dispatcher and was wondering if it is possible to become signed off from flight service to take your practical based soley on experience. Now I undersrand I would have to pass the written and study my butt off to do so. I am in no way thinking based on my experience that I could sit down and pass the test today. However I am wondering if it is possible to be allowed based on experience to test, if so im going to begin to study all I can. Thanks for all your help.
 

SoftSkills

Well-Known Member
While your experience will help you in a dispatch job, you will discover that you will need to attend the 200 hours of classroom time before being recommended by an instructor to take the written/oral test. Also, you will need to pass the ADX standardized test prior to being allowed to take the written/oral exam.
My personal recommendation is to pass the ADX test PRIOR to attending class, so you're not splitting your time between studying course material AND ADX test material. That is merely a personal recommendation, though. There are others who will encourage you otherwise and it's worked for them.

Whatever you decide, best of luck!!
 

IamNegan

Well-Known Member
You will have to go to a dispatch school to get your license - in all honesty, it doesn't matter where you go to get it at, you will gain experience whoever you get hired at.
 

LastMinuteAirline

Well-Known Member
§65.57 Experience or training requirements.
An applicant for an aircraft dispatcher certificate must present documentary evidence satisfactory to the Administrator that he or she has the experience prescribed in paragraph (a) of this section or has accomplished the training described in paragraph (b) of this section as follows:

(a) A total of at least 2 years experience in the 3 years before the date of application, in any one or in any combination of the following areas:
(1) In military aircraft operations as a—
(i) Pilot;
(ii) Flight navigator; or
(iii) Meteorologist.
(2) In aircraft operations conducted under part 121 of this chapter as—
(i) An assistant in dispatching air carrier aircraft, under the direct supervision of a dispatcher certificated under this subpart;
(ii) A pilot;
(iii) A flight engineer; or
(iv) A meteorologist.
(3) In aircraft operations as—
(i) An Air Traffic Controller; or
(ii) A Flight Service Specialist.
(4) In aircraft operations, performing other duties that the Administrator finds provide equivalent experience.
(b) A statement of graduation issued or revalidated in accordance with §65.70(b) of this part, showing that the person has successfully completed an approved aircraft dispatcher course.
 
F

Flying Saluki

Guest
FAR Part 65 details the eligibility requirements to get the certificate. An instructor sign-off isn’t required to take the written test. With your background, and some study with a test prep book, you stand a fair chance of passing. However, you must satisfy the eligibility requirements of FAR Part 65 to sit for practical exam.

However, before you do that, I suggest you arrange to do a job shadow with some Dispatchers. I once had a co-worker who had jumped through all the hoops (certificate, job search, training, comp check, sign-off, etc), only to discover he didn’t like the job. He was competent, but couldn’t cope with the authority and responsibility that goes with the job.
 

Juliet Zulu

Well-Known Member
FAR Part 65 details the eligibility requirements to get the certificate. An instructor sign-off isn’t required to take the written test. With your background, and some study with a test prep book, you stand a fair chance of passing. However, you must satisfy the eligibility requirements of FAR Part 65 to sit for practical exam.

However, before you do that, I suggest you arrange to do a job shadow with some Dispatchers. I once had a co-worker who had jumped through all the hoops (certificate, job search, training, comp check, sign-off, etc), only to discover he didn’t like the job. He was competent, but couldn’t cope with the authority and responsibility that goes with the job.
Jumping on the reply-wagon.

Anyone can take the written ADX at an approved testing center. In order to physically sit in front of a DADE, you need a graduation certificate from an approved FAR Part 65 school. Additionally, an RI (recommending instructor) must sign off on your 8400-3 form in order for IACRA (FAA computer system) to even spit out your app. Your written results are "ingested" into IACRA.

As some have said, if you have a strong knowledge base, you may be able to qualify for the accelerated class. In a 5 week program, for example, the first 3 weeks are prepping for the ADX, and the latter 2 weeks begin a whole new chapter with respect to flight planning.

The requirements to pass the O&P are detailed in the FAA Aircraft Dispatcher Practical Test Standards (PTS), which by law, is a public document.
 

A1TAPE

Well-Known Member
Best recommendation whatever route you go is get your ADX written done BEFORE the class. It will help because then you wont be juggling studying for the written along with studying what you need to for your O&P.
 

flyingmedic

Well-Known Member
§65.57 Experience or training requirements.
An applicant for an aircraft dispatcher certificate must present documentary evidence satisfactory to the Administrator that he or she has the experience prescribed in paragraph (a) of this section or has accomplished the training described in paragraph (b) of this section as follows:

(a) A total of at least 2 years experience in the 3 years before the date of application, in any one or in any combination of the following areas:
(1) In military aircraft operations as a—
(i) Pilot;
(ii) Flight navigator; or
(iii) Meteorologist.
(2) In aircraft operations conducted under part 121 of this chapter as—
(i) An assistant in dispatching air carrier aircraft, under the direct supervision of a dispatcher certificated under this subpart;
(ii) A pilot;
(iii) A flight engineer; or
(iv) A meteorologist.
(3) In aircraft operations as—
(i) An Air Traffic Controller; or
(ii) A Flight Service Specialist.
(4) In aircraft operations, performing other duties that the Administrator finds provide equivalent experience.
(b) A statement of graduation issued or revalidated in accordance with §65.70(b) of this part, showing that the person has successfully completed an approved aircraft dispatcher course.
There is a special rung of hell for people who quote regulations when asked a question.....
 

autosave36

Well-Known Member
Best recommendation whatever route you go is get your ADX written done BEFORE the class. It will help because then you wont be juggling studying for the written along with studying what you need to for your O&P.
That depends on where you go too. Where I went, we all started from step zero but it was a 12 week course. 4-5 of those were getting the adx down, the rest was getting ready for the practical. If it's a 5-6 week course, get that baby done ahead of time.
 

manniax

Well-met in the Ka-tet
There is a special rung of hell for people who quote regulations when asked a question.....
Oh, sometimes it's the right thing to do. I remember one message board where a very condescending pilot said that while they didn't used to mind dispatchers riding in the cockpit, since 9/11 "things have changed" and due to security regulations it was no longer allowed. So...I quoted FAR 121.463...about the operating familiarization requirements...and he grumpily admitted that we could in fact still ride in the jumpseat. In general though, I agree it's best not to just quote FAR's without some sort of explanation.
 

FlyingSioux1

Well-Known Member
That depends on where you go too. Where I went, we all started from step zero but it was a 12 week course. 4-5 of those were getting the adx down, the rest was getting ready for the practical. If it's a 5-6 week course, get that baby done ahead of time.
I would say it really depends on the school you go to. I went through a 6 week program with Jeppesen. Felt that their course is set up nicely for the end of the 6 weeks to take the ADX. Besides, sometimes the test is included in the course fees. Why pay twice if you don't need to?
 
F

Flying Saluki

Guest
Best recommendation whatever route you go is get your ADX written done BEFORE the class. It will help because then you wont be juggling studying for the written along with studying what you need to for your O&P.
I took my written test 5 or 6 weeks into an 8 week course. Had I tried to take it beforehand, I'm sure I would have failed. But because I had the context of the previous 5/6 weeks of classroom learning, studying for the exam was no big deal. I went through the ASA test prep book chapter by chapter, read the material, and answered the questions. The ones I got wrong, I went back and reviewed that material. I think I went through the entire book once, with selected re-readings of certain chapters. I passed the written on the first try.

I think it's fair to say that the only way to pass the test beforehand is by memorization. But that's not learning. At some point, you have to learn something. Are you paying attention A1?
 

Opsflunkie

Active Member
Wow! Thank you all so much for all the info. I believe the route im going to take is to study to take the ADX before hand and attend sheffield for class, unless you all habe other recomendations.
 
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