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Department of Homeland Security Pilot

JoeBlow

Well-Known Member
Industry:
Government - Federal


Description:
Primary Position: This position is a primary/rigorous law enforcement position under definition of 5 CFR 842.803 and 5 CFR 831.903.
Department: Department Of Homeland Security
Agency: Customs and Border Protection
Job Announcement Number:
MHCAMDE-169324-PP

QUALIFICATIONS REQUIRED:
Basic Requirements For This Position.

1. Submit a current FAA Commercial Pilot Certification with the following ratings: airplane, single engine or multi engine land with instrument; OR rotocraft helicopter with instrument. Appropriate U.S. military ratings may be substituted. Other certificates that meet or exceed the requirements of the Commercial Pilot Certificate are also acceptable (e.g., an Airline Transport Pilot Certificate).
2. Submit a current FAA Class I Medical Certificate for initial entry or re-entry into the occupation.
3. Submit the last page of your documented flight log reflecting a minimum of 1500 hours total flight time (100 hours of airplane and/or helicopter within the last 12 months) including 250 Pilot-in-Command and 75 instrument/night hours. Your full flight log book will be required at time of interview for verification.
NOTE: Up to 50% of the 1500 hour total flight requirement may be waived upon verification of prior specialized skills and experiences (e.g., general military flight experience and training, complex aircraft flight instructor experience, multi-engine aircraft time, night vision device operations, imminent danger, and terrain and/or over-water operations.)

4. Age Requirement: In accordance with Public Law 93-950 and 100-238, this position is covered under law enforcement retirement provisions; therefore, candidates must be selected for this position before reaching their 37th birthday. However, CBP has requested an exception to this age requirement and has received approval to change the age from 37 to the day immediately preceding your 40th birthday. This age restriction does not apply if you have served in a federal civilian (not military) law enforcement position covered by Title 5 U.S.C. 8336(c) or Title 5 U.S.C. 8412(d).

2. Certifications:
Current FAA Commercial Pilot Certification with the following ratings: Airplane, Single Engine Land, or Multi Engine Land with instrument rating; OR Rotorcraft helicopter with instrument rating. Current FAA Class 1 Medical Certificate for initial entry into the occupation.

PROVIDE A LEGIBLE COPY OF YOUR FAA CERTIFICATION WITH RATINGS AND MEDICAL CERTIFICATE.

3. Total Flight Time: This position requires a minimum of 1500 hour total flight time (One half of the total flight time may be waived for certain military combat experience), to include 100 Airplane hours and/or Helicopter hours within the last 12 months; AND 250 hours as Pilot-in-Command; AND 75 hours Instrument and/or Night hours.

Career Focus:
Flight

Full-Time Position Type:
Entry-Level, Experienced, Mid-Career

Comment:
Your resume must provide the below information. Failure to provide the requested information will result in the disqualification of your application.
1. Contact Information
E-mail Address
Cell Phone Number
Home Phone Number
Date of Birth (Month, Day and Year)
Three References (for checking at time of interview)

Contact Information:
DHS Murray Welsh Locke | Director, Office of Policy Honors Fellowship
US Department of Homeland Security
3801 Nebraska Ave.
Washington, D.C. 20528
Email: murray.welsh@dhs.gov
Phone: (202) 282-8262

On the first page of your resume provide the total number of flight hours for each category listed below. Do not list simulator hours.

* Total Flight Hours
* Total Hours within the last 12 months
* Total Hours as Pilot in Command
* Total Instrument and/or Night Hours
* Total Hours by Aircraft Category

PROVIDE A LEGIBLE COPY OF THE LAST PAGE OF YOUR FLIGHT LOG BOOK
Requirements
U.S. Citizenship: Candidates must be United States citizens and present proof of citizenship, if selected.
Residency: If you are not currently a CBP employee, you must meet one or more of the following primary residence criteria for the last three years prior to submitting your application for employment:
a) Resided in the United States or its protectorate or territories (excluding short trips abroad, such as vacations);
b) Worked for the United States government as an employee overseas in a federal or military capacity; or
c) Been a dependent of a U.S. federal or military employee serving overseas.
Exceptions may be granted to applicants if they can provide complete state-side coverage information required to make a suitability/security determination. Examples of state-side coverage information include: the state-side address of the company headquarters where the applicant's personnel file is located, the state-side address of the Professor in charge of the applicant's "Study Abroad" program, the church records for the applicant's overseas church missions, and/or the state-side addresses of anyone who worked or studied with the applicant while overseas. Applicants must provide this information when filing their application for employment.
Qualification Requirements: Only those applicants who have met qualification requirements at the time of application will be referred for selection consideration. Please note that qualification claims will be subject to verification.
Background Security Investigation: You will need to successfully complete a background investigation before you can be appointed into this position.
Security Clearance: This position requires a security clearance. If selected for this position, you must obtain and maintain a minimum of a Secret Clearance.
Flight Evaluation: Before you can be appointed to this position you must pass a pre-employment flight evaluation by traveling at your own expense to Oklahoma City, OK where you will be required to demonstrate your flight proficiency by successfully completing a flight evaluation and interviews.

Cover Letter Required:
No


Description:
Created in March 2003, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is the largest investigative branch of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). The agency was created after 9/11, by combining the law enforcement arms of the former Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) and the former U.S. Customs Service, to more effectively enforce our immigration and customs laws and to protect the United States against terrorist attacks. ICE does this by targeting illegal immigrants: the people, money and materials that support terrorism and other criminal activities. ICE is a key component of the DHS "layered defense" approach to protecting the nation.

Industry:
Government - Federal

URL:
www.dhs.gov


Compensation:
GS-11: You qualify at the GS-11 level if you possess one (1) year of specialized experience that equipped you with the skills needed to perform the job duties. This experience must have been equivalent to at least the GS-9 grade level. Examples include: (a) Possessing skills to monitor furtive behavior patterns, body language, mannerisms, and speech to establish probable cause for detention or arrest; (b) Experience in dealing with criminal enforcement activities peculiar to the air operations, including law enforcement techniques, methods, functions, operations, procedures, and statutes in order to conduct law enforcement operations that gather sufficient evidence for criminal prosecution; and (c) Experience in collecting, refining, and analyzing strategic and tactical intelligence in order to execute aviation enforcement operations. You will be converted to the CBP Air Interdiction Agent, GS-1881-11 (Full Performance Level 13) after successful completion of law enforcement training.
 

dc3flyer

Well-Known Member
This was same job was posted a while back (maybe a little over a year ago). I had more than the minimums and applied. I got an email response (from 1600 Pennsylvania Ave) saying I would be considered until a certain time, and never heard back from them.

I have since moved on to bigger and better things, but this would still be an awesome job to have!
 

BillErvin

Peddling as fast as I can
Try this one

http://jobsearch.usajobs.gov/getjob...IT1.x=81&SUBMIT1.y=21&SUBMIT1=Search+for+Jobs


The jobs are all over, but when your a newbie "Think Southern Border":nana2:. Figure on Sierra Vista or Yuma AZ, as well as hot spots like Deming NM or somewhere along the Rio Grande Valley in Texas. The flying jobs primarily support the US Border Patrol but the Spanish requirement went away when Customs Air branch and Border Patrol Air Branch merged.

If you go to the Valley you'll learn spanish:bandit:

Any questions PM me
 

Always Moving

New Member
You will learn Spanish? I was there a few times and people talked in broke down mexican-english. That is like saying that Tex-Mex is like a Paella!
 

orville

New Member
I wouldn't worry too much about learning spanish. I work along the border and I don't speak spanish nor am I scheduled to learn. What guys who've attend the course have told me the course is a joke; it's not geared toward aviation and as along as you par-take you won't fail. I won't say you'll never use it but it would be rare. Hopefully by now management is getting the idea it's a waste of time and money.

If you're going to apply you need to do it soon. With the new administration coming in, the weak economy, hiring is going to slow to a halt. And unless you are station along the border you won't be fly much either. Talk to one guy who is flying less than a 100 hours a year. But hey, the pay is good and it's secure. Good Luck.
 

BillErvin

Peddling as fast as I can
You will learn Spanish? I was there a few times and people talked in broke down mexican-english. That is like saying that Tex-Mex is like a Paella!
Hey I didn't say good spanish:D

There are some areas along the river that knowing a little spanish will keep you out of trouble:bandit:
 

BillErvin

Peddling as fast as I can
I wouldn't worry too much about learning spanish. I work along the border and I don't speak spanish nor am I scheduled to learn. What guys who've attend the course have told me the course is a joke; it's not geared toward aviation and as along as you par-take you won't fail. I won't say you'll never use it but it would be rare. Hopefully by now management is getting the idea it's a waste of time and money.

If you're going to apply you need to do it soon. With the new administration coming in, the weak economy, hiring is going to slow to a halt. And unless you are station along the border you won't be fly much either. Talk to one guy who is flying less than a 100 hours a year. But hey, the pay is good and it's secure. Good Luck.
If its the same Law Enforcement Spanish course they used to teach at FLETC, your right its a joke. The Pilots don't do write ups anyways, thats what pre 10 month Patrol Agent's are for.:D
 
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