Contract Pilot JAA Conversions

juxtapilot

Snowflake
If you are brought on by a third party company for an international carrier, does this mean you will still be required to do the JAA conversions for the international carrier?
 

fsiflyer

Well-Known Member
If the airplanes are registered in the JAA authority then you will have to either get a JAA certificate or get your FAA one validated. The validation procedure is different for each operator and JAA country.

Cheers.
 

bafanguy

Well-Known Member
what does the FAA validation process entail?
Benji,

I can't speak with absolute certainty since I only have one license conversion but I believe license conversions have nothing to do with the FAA.

They are controlled and conducted by the country in which you propose to work. You show up there with your FAA tickets, dance the local dance and get THEIR license conversion based on the validity of your FAA ticket. The FAA is not a part of the process beyond having issued you a license way back when.

The more-knowledgeable will comment shortly.
 

fsiflyer

Well-Known Member
Benji,

I can't speak with absolute certainty since I only have one license conversion but I believe license conversions have nothing to do with the FAA.

They are controlled and conducted by the country in which you propose to work. You show up there with your FAA tickets, dance the local dance and get THEIR license conversion based on the validity of your FAA ticket. The FAA is not a part of the process beyond having issued you a license way back when.

The more-knowledgeable will comment shortly.
Pretty much that says it all. I hold a validation for Bermuda. You send them all the records they want and they validate and send you a certificate which is valid when accompanied by my FAA ATP certificate. Good luck.
 

bafanguy

Well-Known Member
fsiflyer,

All you had to do was paperwork ? I had to do ground school and a sim check.

I guess every country is a new adventure. My son got a South African validation a couple of years ago and said he had to unlearn everything he ever knew about instrument approaches and associated legalities.

Just part of the "adventure". Think globally and roll with the punches. :D
 

fsiflyer

Well-Known Member
fsiflyer,

All you had to do was paperwork ? I had to do ground school and a sim check.

I guess every country is a new adventure. My son got a South African validation a couple of years ago and said he had to unlearn everything he ever knew about instrument approaches and associated legalities.

Just part of the "adventure". Think globally and roll with the punches. :D
That's basically it. Just learn to roll with it. Each country and validation is different. Some are more difficult than others. I just prefer to fly "N" registered aircraft and not worry about it. :)
 
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