Bypass Fan

Ophir

Well-Known Member
What was the first commercial jetliner to use the bypass fan?

When they talk about huss kits for older louder jets, what do they do to quiet the jet?
 

dakovich

Well-Known Member
i belive the first Jetliner was built by Avro, but i'm not sure on if it used a high bypass or what.
 

JHines

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
What was the first commercial jetliner to use the bypass fan?

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Probably Boeing 707 or Convair 880/990.

707 started out with the P&W JT3C which were pure turbojets, but they were later equipped with the P&W JT3D (a low-bypass front fan design), and the GE CJ-805-23 (a commercial engine with a J79 core and a rear-mounted fan). Service entry of the 707 was mid to late 1950's (1954?).

The 880/990 entered service in about 1962 ?, but had the CJ-805-23 from the start, so it might have been the first one to service with a turbofan.
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]
What was the first commercial jetliner to use the bypass fan?

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Fan engines......Patooie!!!

I love the days of straight turbojets that turned JP-4 into noise, no pansy-ass bypass.

Like the old CJ-610 engines on the Lear 23/24/25 series, or the J60s on the Sabreliner 40s.
 

gay_pilot18

New Member
Are high bypass turbo fan engines the kind on B-757's, 767's A320's and a host of other commercial aircraft that are sooooooooooo very quiet. And make a very kinda "hollow" low whining sound on take-off?

Also what kinda engines do F-16's & F-15's and the such have? Maybe MikeD can answer this question.

But last week I was visitng family in Tucson AZ. and caught the morning Delta flt. to ATL and it was like 8am and the national guard is based at the airport and they fly F-16's and these things were taking off without "afterburner" mind you and THE WHOLE DAMN AIRPORT was shaking. I later talked to my cousin who lives 10-15 mi. away from the airport and she says she hears them takeoff every morning DAMN THATS LOUD.

Getting back to the point someone told me those engines are called "low bypass" engines is this true?


Everett
 

JHines

New Member
Yes, virtually all commerical transports use high bypass turbofans. The bypass ratio is the ratio of airflow passing through the fan to that passing through the core.

Many military aircraft are equipped with low-bypass turbofans (example: bypass ratio might be 0.7 as compared to 8 in a high-bypass commerical engine).

F-16s and F-15s were both originally equipped with the P&W F100 (a low-bypass turbofan). It is in the 30,000 lb. thrust class and was originally developed for the F-15. It was one of the first engines to have a very high thrust-to-weight ratio, but suffered development problems (mostly with compressor surge/stall). Many F-15s and F-16s have been retrofitted with the GE F110 - it is a derivative of the F101 from the B-1 and is very similar in overall design to the F100.
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]

Also what kinda engines do F-16's & F-15's and the such have? Maybe MikeD can answer this question.

But last week I was visitng family in Tucson AZ. and caught the morning Delta flt. to ATL and it was like 8am and the national guard is based at the airport and they fly F-16's and these things were taking off without "afterburner" mind you and THE WHOLE DAMN AIRPORT was shaking.

[/ QUOTE ]

Sure they were non-AB takeoffs? Reason I ask is that's kind of rare to do that; and normal engine ops don't usually shake/rattle/roll everything.
 

N519AT

Ahh! This is how I change this!
I know this might be off topic, but which jet aircraft was the first to have reverse thrust?
 

gay_pilot18

New Member
Well I didn't see afterburner trailing out from the engines. It's usually very noticable with it's blueish/purpleish red tint.

And they did shake the whole airport quite violently but it was just totally awesome to experience.

They started at like 7:30am or something like that. It was a flight of two, sometimes a flight of just 1 or a flight of 4.

Each time they took off it was just awesome to both see and hear.

Now here is the bigger question I was wondering. The pilot told me the runways in TUS are 11L/29R. He told me that the runway is like 10,800 ft. long and 150 width.

Now these F-16's are kinda small most took off without ordinance on/under the wings so why'd they get airborne almost just before the numbers?

I think MikeD is in TUS or at least in PHX. or somewhere in AZ. maybe he might be able to answer that question since he is military.


Everett
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]
Well I didn't see afterburner trailing out from the engines. It's usually very noticable with it's blueish/purpleish red tint.

And they did shake the whole airport quite violently but it was just totally awesome to experience.

They started at like 7:30am or something like that. It was a flight of two, sometimes a flight of just 1 or a flight of 4.

Each time they took off it was just awesome to both see and hear.

Now here is the bigger question I was wondering. The pilot told me the runways in TUS are 11L/29R. He told me that the runway is like 10,800 ft. long and 150 width.

Now these F-16's are kinda small most took off without ordinance on/under the wings so why'd they get airborne almost just before the numbers?

I think MikeD is in TUS or at least in PHX. or somewhere in AZ. maybe he might be able to answer that question since he is military.


Everett




[/ QUOTE ]

Ev,

Yup, I'm about 5 miles from the Guard's ops at TUS. Assuming they departed off 11L, it's really 15,253' X 150' overall, but 10,996' useable on 11L, and the same usable on 29R with a 3300' overrun.

Now which "numbers" would you be referring to? Even w/o ordnance, the F-16 would need about 2K of runway or slightly longer to get airborne.

You'll never see them departing out of TUS with "heavy" ordnance. That required a designated load area which only exists at DM, so they come here to fly with heavyweight ord.
 
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