BP meds - no longer on them, now what

satpak77

New Member
First post on this website- thanks for such a service and tell the guy that started this site "thanks"

With that said, a question....

A guy at our company came to me with this question, I suppose because my own BP is elevated and I "know" about the topic. But this question is a little different

This person, who holds a Comm pilot license, is working in admin/corporate functions in the company, he has an expired 2nd class, it expired last year. Now he will come into the flight department as a Co-Pilot and will be getting a new medical.

He WAS on BP meds for approx two months, up until 90 days ago (meds started in March 2008 until April 2008, then in May 2008 until present no meds), but due to lifestyle changes, new diet, exercise, he made the decision to stop taking them and monitor his BP. It was much lower, and under FAA standards. It is still fine to this day. No BP meds. BP meds stopped over 90 days ago. No BP meds currently used, and his BP is within FAA protocol.

Remember, his medical certificate is expired and he has not flown at all (exercised his airman certificate) while the short time that he was on BP meds.

Now, when applying for a NEW medical, he will of course disclose that he had elevated BP in the past and if the AME asks, he will explain his lifestyle changes, etc.

MY QUESTION:

If he is NO LONGER ON BP MEDS, and MEETS the BP protocol, will he still need to send in blood work, ECG, all that stuff to the FAA?

I advised him to "disclose" but don't advertise...we don't need to raise red flags if we can avoid it. He plans on reporting "No medications currently used" on the medical application (which is true, it says currently), then check the "yes, I had elevated BP in the past" box, then verbally explain the situation to the AME.

Anyone see anything wrong with this or improper, etc? (I don't, but I want to toss this out to the audience to digest).

The alternative is get started on obtaining the ECG, blood work, hypertension paperwork the FAA needs which frankly, if we don't have to do it, we won't. Why roll the dice on the ECG machine having transient voltage or breakfast tacos showing up in bloodwork if we don't need to.
 

Minuteman

“Dongola”
Obviously I'll defer to the doc. Buuut, based on my experience with blood pressure and medicals, if he reports the prior treatment for hypertension and the AME takes a BP reading during the exam that is within acceptable limits, that's all the further I would expect to need to go on that topic.
 

My Flight Surgeon

Sr. Aviation Medical Examiner
He should do as you suggested.

The thing that bothers me about this post is the statement No BP meds currently used, and his BP is within FAA protocol. The problem is the FAA standard is 155/96 whereas the medically accepted limits are 140/90 and less than 130/86 is optimal. The issue is not to get by the FAA medical but to live a long healthy life (sometimes interrupted by stroke or heart attack as a result of hypertension.
 

satpak77

New Member
He should do as you suggested.

The thing that bothers me about this post is the statement No BP meds currently used, and his BP is within FAA protocol. The problem is the FAA standard is 155/96 whereas the medically accepted limits are 140/90 and less than 130/86 is optimal. The issue is not to get by the FAA medical but to live a long healthy life (sometimes interrupted by stroke or heart attack as a result of hypertension.
Thank you Dr. for the quick response. What a great website !

He is currently exercising and working out, eating healthier, his BP is now 135ish over 90's, down from 150/90. So he is aware of the health consequences.

He was (I agree) somewhat reluctant to go on meds which trigger FAA disclosure via "comply with hypertension" protocol stuff (ECG, letter from cardiologist, etc) if he could avoid it.

Not that he is "hiding anything" but usually simpler is better sometimes.
 

jima7011

The Fire Chief
BTW-

He was (I agree) somewhat reluctant to go on meds which trigger FAA disclosure via "comply with hypertension" protocol stuff (ECG, letter from cardiologist, etc) if he could avoid it.
This is not a problem--I am currently treated for Hypertension and have no problem with my 1st Class medical-I went through all that and it was really nothing.
 

WacoFan

Bigly
I know that it is bad manners to "bump" a thread, but I am doing it anyway because this is a good thread, but mostly because I didn't want people to see "Cannibus Usage" as the first thread on the Ask A Flight Surgeon forum and get the idea that this forum is a debating society. Sorry for the "bump", just fixing something that I thought would help.
 
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