A little light rime icing:

Derg

New Arizona, Il Duce/Warlord
Staff member
And about the only way you can tell if you're picking it up in an MD-88:



It forms on the bolt of the windshield wiper (on the right) and on the (now deactivated because of it was a carcinogen) rain repellent tube.
 

RiddlePilot

New Member
That's light for you guys?


I can't tell the dimensions from that picture, but I've seen that in GA planes, and it's a bit disconcerting.
 

Derg

New Arizona, Il Duce/Warlord
Staff member
I dunno, maybe moderate?


My brain is fuzzy - first day home.
 

MQAAord

Scheherazade
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]
I've seen that in GA planes, and it's a bit disconcerting.


[/ QUOTE ]

Disconcerting? Try seeing that on an ATR...
 

Derg

New Arizona, Il Duce/Warlord
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]
Disconcerting? Try seeing that on an ATR...

[/ QUOTE ]

The only ice that I'd want to see on an ATR is in my cup with a little bit of Pepsi.
 

sigmanu499

New Member
Me too.If you fly in socal all that weather(ice, thunderstorm) stuff they teach in ground school, just doesn't seem useful.
 

MDPilot

Well-Known Member
I'd call it light, too. As a point of reference, that rain repellent tube is about 1/4" in diameter.

One time I landed in Ohio (not in the MD88) and had about an inch of clear ice plastered all over the radome and gear pods. Nothing on the wings or tail, thanks to the good anti-ice systems on the airplane. I called that one moderate (But I wouldn't do it again intentionally
).
 

EatSleepFly

Well-Known Member
Well, the severity of ice is classified by rate of accumulation (i.e. 1/4 inch in 15-60 min. is considered "light").

As a little side note on the topic of ice...

1/4 inch of ice on the V35 Bonanza weighs approximately 300-330 lbs. Kinda scary, huh?
 

RiddlePilot

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
1/4 inch of ice on the V35 Bonanza weighs approximately 300-330 lbs. Kinda scary, huh?

[/ QUOTE ]

I once had 3/4-1" mixed on a light twin after getting into some inadvertent icing. This thing was covered... I mean, wings, tail, windscreen, props, etc. I don't even want to know what that weighed, though I remember the plane was maintaining level at about 5 degrees nose up at 'round 160 TAS. Scary. I'll never do that again.
 

chperplt

New Member
When it comes to icing, you have to love the Beech 1900. That thing will haul a ton of ice without any problems.

It's amazing where ice forms on that thing though..
 

Derg

New Arizona, Il Duce/Warlord
Staff member
The 1900 is the "Ice Master".

Great aircraft in icing and can handle loads of ice.
 

Lee D

Well-Known Member
Then Utah and the rest of the Rocky Mountain states are just the opposite of Socal. (At least during the late fall, winter and early spring months.) Freezing levels are always too low or on the ground. Not many GA pilots in Utah launch into IFR here without good anti ice equipment. Those that do eventually end up with some sort of scary experience. In fact most of the pilots I know who have been in heavy IFR around here have some sort of ice story. A good friend of mine who flies the EMB-120's for Skywest says that they frequently pick up some sort ice when flying in the clouds over UT. ID. WY. MT etc.

Last year I flew a traffic plane from time to time. One cold winter morning while still in Night VFR conditions I flew through what looked like very light virga. Only took about 5 seconds to get through it, was still VFR, but I quickly had a nice light coat of rime. Just a trace, but I was amazed/impressed with how quick it happened.
 

Androol

New Member
I have yet to be even a little concerned in the mighty Beech 1900 during icing. Good de/anti-ice systems and it can handle a load. Just got to anticipate icing far enough in advance so you can get the windshield heated up. Got caught off guard the other day and it took 20 min to melt off the ice. Also the ice coming off the props and hitting the side of the plane can be un-nerving to passengers.
 

EDUC8-or

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
(now deactivated because of it was a carcinogen) rain repellent tube.

[/ QUOTE ]

How did that thing work? How were they able to tell it caused cancer?
 

Derg

New Arizona, Il Duce/Warlord
Staff member
It basically squirted a stream of citrus-smelling chemical goo on the windshield that would act like Rain-X.

I don't know how they determined it was a carcinogen besides either someone getting cancer or some of the chemicals used to make it.
 
Top