41 and want to Fly

donttouchanything

New Member
Am I crazy or what?

I'm at a point in life where I know that if I don't chase those dreams they'll die. Someday they'll nail the lid shut on me and I would take a huge amount of regret into that box for not trying to do what I've dreamed of since I was a kid.

I hold a PPL and need advice of what if any route to take to fly for a living.

I'm not dreaming of being a 777 Capt. But I'd be damn happy with a regional job.

I'd fly a tanker to Hell just to be able to say I did it.

Am I wrong? or should I press on?
 

SteveC

Really?
Staff member
Well, I'm four years older than you and am just now working into aviation (soon to go from part-time pilot to full-time, I hope!).

So, any guess what my response will be?
 

Pfly

Well-Known Member
Go for it. Even an entire career at a regional can't be bad if you love what you do.
 

flyitup

Well-Known Member
Keith...

Welcome to the forums!


I say go for it! If it's something that you feel will truly make you happy than do your best to make it happen. I also think a regional job is a good target to shoot for although I'm not sure how fast you can advance up the pay scale . There are several regional pilots on the forums that I'm sure would be glad to help you. Davetheflyer and FlyChicaga are a couple.

Good luck!
 

ready2fly

Well-Known Member
Well, I'm in my late 30's and I'm pursuing that same "dream".

Let me offer this, though:

Are you married? Do you have kids? How much $$ do you have in the bank? Can you and your family handle the expense, aggravation and elation that is part of a career in aviation?

Sit down with your spouse (if you have one) and talk it out THOROUGHLY! Let her know what flying for a living might mean = days/weeks away from home. Holidays, birthdays, anniversaries, weddings, funerals, recitals, games, missed.

If she's behind you 100% - then, by all means - go for it.

Best of luck!

R2F
 

donttouchanything

New Member
The wife is very supportive, of course she thinks her only other option is to have me drag my butt around the house and gennerally make a nusance of myself (wonder where she got that idea).

Kids are pretty much grown and low maintenance at this point, except my youngest who thinks "flying is the way coolest dad". So I don't anticipate any real dificulty at home.

I seen too many people in life who have stopped chasing their dreams, it's not a pretty sight and I don't want to join that club.

Thanks
 

ready2fly

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
I seen too many people in life who have stopped chasing their dreams, it's not a pretty sight and I don't want to join that club.


[/ QUOTE ]
Amen bro!!!

Best of luck! Start earning those ratings and building those hours!

R2F
 

Soonermurph

New Member
I just turned 37. I'm a flight instructor who gave up a law practice a year and a half ago to pursue the dream. My wife and kids have followed me around the country in pursuit of the dream. It's a long hard path but it beats suing people for a living. Before you jump in, make sure your wife understands the sacrafices and is fully on board. I am furtunate to have a wife like mine but there are other wives that would not be able to handle it. I've found out that flying is a lifestyle, not just a job. Think about that.
 

JollyRodger

New Member
Soonerup:

Not to hijack, this thread but what kind of law did you practice? What made you want to leave? I'm thinking about L-school next fall and I'm canvassing opinions. I'm still not sure on what to do. I think I may use the JD for business rather than the more conventional fields. I'm looking at a UGPA of 3.5 and 161 LSAT, not exactly Yale material, but I could probably get into a respected program. Any thought would be appreciated.
 

FL270

New Member
You might also consider going the corporate aviation route as a career ... it has the advantage that you're not limited by the "age 60" rule when flying Part 91, as well as paying better than the regionals as a rule.

No matter what, you're not too old to get started, and if it's what you want to do, go for it! Good luck ...

FL270
 

Bluffster

New Member
I would suggest you take it one step at a time. If you don't have your instrument rating yet, start working toward it. Then get commercial and CFI certificates.

If you decide to stick with it for a living, you'll figure out if it's for you along the way. If not, you'll still become a heck of a better pilot.

Start teaching part-time at a local flight school. Instructing is one of the best part-time jobs out there. You get to fly in your off-hours much more than you do now and you'll get extra income for it. If you like flying enough, you'll end up teaching full-time eventually leaving your past career behind. From there, you'll know where to go for the next step.
 

Soonermurph

New Member
I was in civil litigation: mainly auto/truck accident cases. I don't know how to measure your LSAT score. When I took it, the scale was 1 to 35.

The practice of law is exciting but it will take everything you have (time etc.). The stress is high for lawyers in private practice. I knew too many lawyers with a whiskey bottle in their desk or a heart attack at 45. That is why I got into aviation after nine years of suing people. I am happy to say that I haven't sued anybody in a year and a half.
 

pkloop

New Member
Fly on, chase the dream at the end of it if nothing else you can look back and say you had one hell of a time trying to get the job and learned alot and FLEW alot on the way!! If nothing else you can become one hell of a 172 Captain
 

av8rmsu

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
I knew too many lawyers with a wiskey bottle in their desk. That is why I got into aviation after nine years of suing people.

[/ QUOTE ]


I'm still working on my ratings, but I do believe bringing a bottle of whiskey into the cockpit would be highle frowned upon by the airlines.



Being facetious, of course.
 

Mr_Creepy

Well-Known Member
Depends on the whiskey. White Label is ok, but get me some Glenlivets or Johnnie Walker Black ....

"PHX approach this is XYZ 1234 at 4 thousand. We've got Whiskey, want some?"
 

av8rmsu

Well-Known Member
An interphone conversation...


"Stewardess, if you could please bring me a Jack and Coke, and the F/O would like a Stoli on the rocks, thank you"
 

SATXaviator

New Member
I feel your pain....the cure may just be to go for it. For me deciding to make a career and lifestyle change has kept me up at nights for years. (tonight's no exception) At 36 I am taking some action...I just can't live with the what if's any more. Good luck to you.
 

Cruise

Well-Known Member
Life is way to short to be miserable!!!!!!! I never want to look back and say woulda, shoulda, coulda........I'm 32 and didn't want to be 40 and miserable in a rewarding (both personally and monitarily) profession. What good is having all that money if you don't have any time to do anything with it and don't particularly enjoy making it.

I recently gave up my career in the medical field....after lots of school and hard work, I was finally at the point in my career where I would start recovering my education investment.....instead, I decided I was miserable and followed my heart.

I entered a flight school in FL and I LOVE IT......despite being broke, I am happier now, than I've ever been.

Live the dream!.......from someone who is doing the same.
 

Luftpost

New Member
I started training for my PPL in 2001. Moved to Florida to coninue training, instruct,etc....I am now 36 years old, and am flying MU-300's, BE-400 and BE-400A. I achieved that in under 1000 hours. I have an extrememly supportive wife and two great kids.

Before I became a career changer, I made good money, had the house, the car, etc. BUT, I was not happy. Now I am making money again, and pinch myself every day.

This morning I wake up in sunny Van Nuys, CA. Later today its off to Vegas.

Follow your dreams!!!!!
 
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