103 stage check ?

av8or91

Well-Known Member
Im doing my 103 this coming week, just wondering if anyone knows some of the weak areas and if there is something stage pilots really like to hit on. I know I need to know the commercial and instrument PTS which I have looked over and studied many times. Anything helps:)
 

TXaviator

Well-Known Member
Im doing my 103 this coming week, just wondering if anyone knows some of the weak areas and if there is something stage pilots really like to hit on. I know I need to know the commercial and instrument PTS which I have looked over and studied many times. Anything helps:)

know your systems. a lot of stagers will pick say 4 systems then you get to pick 2 and describe how they work in full detail.

KNOW HOW WEIGHT AND CG AFFECT VMC AND STABILITY.

know the 11 factors that affect vmc and how each one works.

know it COLD.
 

ProudPilot

Aeronautics Geek
You must know the limitations on the autopilots, YOU MUST! This is not a haha, I can fly it, no, learn when you can use it. Which ones work in single engine operations, IFR, minimums, approaches, Glideslope. Also know how the ADS-B works, this one is more simple, but the answer of "uh... it has traffic" is not enough.

Otherwise, all the things he said. Also, relax... it's to see how much you know, NOT to fail you. Breathe, take it one at a time, and have fun.

Good Luck
 

av8or91

Well-Known Member
Yea I knew VMC would be a big one, im pretty comforatable with all of the factors that effect it.

Which autopilot works single engine? I thought both the S-tech and the KFC 150 do.

Im confident about the flight portion, just the oral is what really makes me nervous because there is such a broad range of topics.

Since the only seminole I have flown is glass( not by choice, just luck) what are the static ports on the rear sides of the fuselage for. My instructor isnt sure exactly.
 

stuckingfk

Well-Known Member
What you should do is look at each POH for the STEC limitations and the KFC 150 limitations.

There are subtle differences. Also, the STEC isn't certified for SE ops. I believe the static ports in rear of the seminole are for the autopilot, or the transponder.

Go look in a plane's individual POH or go talk to maintenance. They're usually pretty good.
 

av8or91

Well-Known Member
What you should do is look at each POH for the STEC limitations and the KFC 150 limitations.

There are subtle differences. Also, the STEC isn't certified for SE ops. I believe the static ports in rear of the seminole are for the autopilot, or the transponder.

Go look in a plane's individual POH or go talk to maintenance. They're usually pretty good.

I have read both of POH's for the AP, the s-tec is not approved for single engine approaches but does not say it can not be used for single engine climb cruise or descent. I think johnson said something in class about the static ports on the rear fuselage being for the s-tec autopilot. Havent found anywhere that says that.
 

TXaviator

Well-Known Member
is it just me or does anyone else feel way more comfortable simply DISENGAGING the autopilot once they identify an engine failure??

it just made me really uneasy having an abnormal situation like that and the autopilot just going on and driving me to whatever fate it decides....

AP in that situation really made me feel like i was "along for the ride".

anyone else get that feeling?
 

stuckingfk

Well-Known Member
is it just me or does anyone else feel way more comfortable simply DISENGAGING the autopilot once they identify an engine failure??

it just made me really uneasy having an abnormal situation like that and the autopilot just going on and driving me to whatever fate it decides....

AP in that situation really made me feel like i was "along for the ride".

anyone else get that feeling?
Nope.

All advanced training in your future has you turn the autopilot on at minimum altitude for engagement in a single engine situation.
 

TXaviator

Well-Known Member
Nope.

All advanced training in your future has you turn the autopilot on at minimum altitude for engagement in a single engine situation.

maybe part of it was that my instructor had no idea whether the ap could be used single engine or not... and i didnt feel like testing it out to see which one put me into a spin in the semi :)
 

av8or91

Well-Known Member
I always have turned the autopilot off when doing single engine stuff.

How did your flights go, what things did you do. I noticed int PTS doesnt say anything about a Config demo, do you actually do this?


If you have an engine fire in flight, I know you run through the checklist then they are expecting you to enter an emergency descent. I completely disagree with doing this because I feel like the increased airflow will just fuel the fire. I also have concerns about fire conatcting the rear portions of the plane. Realistically thinking, wouldnt you just want to enter a slip away from the dead engine to keep the fire away from the cabin?
 

TXaviator

Well-Known Member
I always have turned the autopilot off when doing single engine stuff.

How did your flights go, what things did you do. I noticed int PTS doesnt say anything about a Config demo, do you actually do this?


If you have an engine fire in flight, I know you run through the checklist then they are expecting you to enter an emergency descent. I completely disagree with doing this because I feel like the increased airflow will just fuel the fire. I also have concerns about fire conatcting the rear portions of the plane. Realistically thinking, wouldnt you just want to enter a slip away from the dead engine to keep the fire away from the cabin?
a 200mph wind should be able to blow out a fire. and no i didnt do a cofig demo but yes we did do an engine fire scenario. dont forget to ACTUALLY cut off the fuel to the engine and secure it.
 

djsCFI

Well-Known Member
Ok, just clarifying some information so you don't get it wrong on your stage check! the static ports on the back ARE for the S-TEC autopilot, it uses its own separate static ports. both autopilots can be used for single engine ops, even for single engine approaches! The Bendix can be used for single engine no matter what. The S-TEC is a little different. If you have an engine failure DURING the approach, then you must disconnect it and the rest of the approach must be completed without the autopilot. However, it never says that, if the engine failed during cruise, that you cannot use it for an approach. Read the limitations and operating notes for both autopilots, stage pilots are cracking down hard on the autopilot!
 

av8or91

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the claification on the autopilot limitations.

I did my last lesson with my instructor today(lesson 102) . We did simulate and engine fire, so I ran throught the checklist then my instructor came back behind an undid everything I did. Then I entered an emergency descent. Is this typiclly what will with the stage pilot will do or will you just have the engine shut down then do the emergency descent and recover above 4000 agl and do a restart. Im probably over thinking this but I just want to find out for sure.
 

djsCFI

Well-Known Member
typically, you will just shut down the engine after the engine fire, then restart it again without doing the emergency descent at that time. If the stage pilot wants to do that, then yes he will probably come back behind you and undo everything you do. but again, he probably won't do that...be prepared for anything though!!
 

av8or91

Well-Known Member
typically, you will just shut down the engine after the engine fire, then restart it again without doing the emergency descent at that time. If the stage pilot wants to do that, then yes he will probably come back behind you and undo everything you do. but again, he probably won't do that...be prepared for anything though!!

Thanks alot. I just put my logbook into records today should have a stage pilot soon assuming there is no records corrections and there isnt much of a waiting list.
 

av8or91

Well-Known Member
What is the minimum recovery altitude for an emergency descent? Can't find it in the standardization manual.
 

Micaoct

Well-Known Member
What is the minimum recovery altitude for an emergency descent? Can't find it in the standardization manual.
I remember recovering at about 1500 MSL, the ground was about 1000 feet so I guess you need to recover by 500 AGL. Although recover a little earlier for buffer, it also helps make it a little hazier if you were gonna hit your intended landing spot or not. I would recover before the minimum altitude unless your stage pilot wants you to go all the way down.

Btw make sure there isn't a airport nearby when you do your emergency descent, most of the ones I've had to do were all the way down to the runway. It all depends on what your stage pilot wants.

Edit- Scratch that, I was thinking about simulated engine failures. Policies and Procedures say that MRA is 3000 AGL for most maneuvers. Not sure about the emergency decent. Last time I did it we went from the emergency decent down to the pivotal altitude to do the Eights on Pylons.
 

av8or91

Well-Known Member
Im talking about the simulated emergency descent, not an actual emergency. I was just wondering if its different because all of the MRA's for maneuvers is above 3000 agl.

Doing my flight on wednesday.
 

TXaviator

Well-Known Member
I remember recovering at about 1500 MSL, the ground was about 1000 feet so I guess you need to recover by 500 AGL. Although recover a little earlier for buffer, it also helps make it a little hazier if you were gonna hit your intended landing spot or not. I would recover before the minimum altitude unless your stage pilot wants you to go all the way down.

Btw make sure there isn't a airport nearby when you do your emergency descent, most of the ones I've had to do were all the way down to the runway. It all depends on what your stage pilot wants.

Edit- Scratch that, I was thinking about simulated engine failures. Policies and Procedures say that MRA is 3000 AGL for most maneuvers. Not sure about the emergency decent. Last time I did it we went from the emergency decent down to the pivotal altitude to do the Eights on Pylons.
ahaha i remember my 323 ride.... "whats the pivotal altitude you calculated today".... uhhhh lets see... i just did it at xxx altitude...and it worked....so the altitude is xxx.


"uhm, ok well, good job"
 
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