Where would I get PPL book?

blakehanson

New Member
I was wondering what is a good book for the PPL course?

Im going to be starting my training in probably a month or so and I was wondering if someone could recommend a PPL book to start studying ahead for?

I got an instrument book, although, when I was glancing through it I had no idea what was going on. So Im hoping that If I learn in the correct order I will better understand. lol (Go figure)

So any recomendations on a book and where to get one?

Thanks alot,
Blake
 

JulietBravo

On Call, On Demand
Those are the best books you could use! I would also recommend, depending on how your doing your training, the Jeppesen Private book. Its basically a textbook on everything you need to know and works great. I used the Instrument/Commercial and I loved it! Very easy and simple to understand.
 

bdhill1979

Gone West
The best place to start would be the Airplane Flying Handbook and the Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical knowledge.

You can find them and many others here on the FAA's website:
http://www.faa.gov/library/manuals/
:yeahthat:+ a million billion
The PHAK, the AFH, and a FAR/AIM are all you really need.

Ome question. Are these books similar to the books you would be getting in class for the PPL class??
See here is the thing about the books they try to sell you; they all rehash the same information that the FAA will give you for free.

I hate the Jeppesen books, vehemently; When a student shows up with one of those I tell them to return it if they can or sell it on ebay. They take two pages to explain what the FAA says in one or two paragraphs. It is like they are trying to add more fluff to make you feel like you didn't get ripped off for buying it. I remember when I was working on my instrument rating there were a lot of things I simply did not understand from reading the Jeppesen books, and at that point I had no idea the FAA published their own handbook. I got my hands on an FAA instrument flying handbook and all of a sudden it made sense.

Furthermore when you go to the checkride the PTS (practical test standards) that you will be evaluated on is not derived from the Jeppesen books, but is aligned with the FAA books.
 

dc3flyer

Well-Known Member
I agree with all above comments. I would like to add, a very easy read is Rod Muchado's Private Pilot book. Bill Kershner also had a good one, but I always felt Rod was much easier to read, a little less textbook-ish.
 

Cessnaflyer

Wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
:yeahthat:+ a million billion
The PHAK, the AFH, and a FAR/AIM are all you really need.



See here is the thing about the books they try to sell you; they all rehash the same information that the FAA will give you for free.

I hate the Jeppesen books, vehemently; When a student shows up with one of those I tell them to return it if they can or sell it on ebay. They take two pages to explain what the FAA says in one or two paragraphs. It is like they are trying to add more fluff to make you feel like you didn't get ripped off for buying it. I remember when I was working on my instrument rating there were a lot of things I simply did not understand from reading the Jeppesen books, and at that point I had no idea the FAA published their own handbook. I got my hands on an FAA instrument flying handbook and all of a sudden it made sense.

Furthermore when you go to the checkride the PTS (practical test standards) that you will be evaluated on is not derived from the Jeppesen books, but is aligned with the FAA books.
Exactly that is why this is pretty much the only thing I have my students read. Really the only non-FAA books I have them read are by Kershner.
 

blakehanson

New Member
wow! So what im gathering is stick to the books from the faa site. I will do that. Plus its free!

Thanks alot!

Also, do you guys know about the FAA Test we have to take? What are they like?

I got the book called Test Prep Private Pilot 08. This book says it has the questions from the faa tests.

Is this true?
How can that be?
Can it be that easy?

Let me know what you guys think.
 

sdfcvoh

This is my Custom Title
The tests are probably best studied by going to sportys.com and finding the faa test section. You can take them for free also. I recommend studying the books recommended above, the PHAK, AFH, and especially the AIM which is in the back of the FAR (referred to as the FAR/AIM.)

Whether or not it is correct, many people "memorize" the tests by simply taking the practice tests over and over. It is a pretty antiquated system. Most important is to study thee books above, and get with a good well traveled CFI who has been instructing for a while. The first impression of instruction you get will be the most lasting you can get. Start with a senior/gold seal instructor and you'll never regret it.

And good luck! This flying stuff is pretty awesome.:D

wow! So what im gathering is stick to the books from the faa site. I will do that. Plus its free!

Thanks alot!

Also, do you guys know about the FAA Test we have to take? What are they like?

I got the book called Test Prep Private Pilot 08. This book says it has the questions from the faa tests.

Is this true?
How can that be?
Can it be that easy?

Let me know what you guys think.
 

bdhill1979

Gone West
wow! So what im gathering is stick to the books from the faa site. I will do that. Plus its free!

Thanks alot!

Also, do you guys know about the FAA Test we have to take? What are they like?

I got the book called Test Prep Private Pilot 08. This book says it has the questions from the faa tests.

Is this true?
How can that be?
Can it be that easy?

Let me know what you guys think.
Correct the test bank questions are public information. The PPL test bank is 900 some odd questions and you get 60 of those randomly selected. I think that about 20% of the test bank info is actually useful, and timely information. The rest is mostly outdated and impractical. I recommend studying for the written early and basically get it out of the way so you can focus on the important stuff.
 

mooneyguy

been around forever
I actually used the Jeppesen books for the PPL, IR, and COMM, yes you can get the same info from the FAA, I did use thos to whn the COMM and CFI training started, but I like the jepp books, and still look at them on a regular basis.
You will find in aviation everybody has "the best way" to do everything, and what you will find, is that you will find your own best way too.

There are, and have been arguments forever on High wing Low wing, Headsets, part 141 part 61, books vs videos, the list is endless....

The most important thing I THINK you could do, is find a GOOD instructor! He will show you his best way to get you done!

Also, once you find an instructor dont just hop into a plane and bolt off with him/her ask them to get a cup of coffee, or lunch and have a get to know each other time. Its better to find out before you start if there
is, or could be a potential problem.

Have fun with the training!:nana2:
 

youngflyer

Well-Known Member
Correct the test bank questions are public information. The PPL test bank is 900 some odd questions and you get 60 of those randomly selected. I think that about 20% of the test bank info is actually useful, and timely information. The rest is mostly outdated and impractical. I recommend studying for the written early and basically get it out of the way so you can focus on the important stuff.
Agreed. Many of the questions have many right answers but only one is the "FAA Correct Answer". Just keep in mind that you might get a lower test grade then if you took it during your training just because you are taking a test on something you basically never done before.
 

Cessnaflyer

Wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
Agreed. Many of the questions have many right answers but only one is the "FAA Correct Answer". Just keep in mind that you might get a lower test grade then if you took it during your training just because you are taking a test on something you basically never done before.
Hopefully you've done it before, or else you didn't really earn that endorsement to take the test in the first place.
 

youngflyer

Well-Known Member
Hopefully you've done it before, or else you didn't really earn that endorsement to take the test in the first place.
I meant that if you have never flown a light aircraft some of the concepts are foreign compared to actually realizing how the stuff you have learned about in studying actually affects the airplane.
 

blakehanson

New Member
youngflyer: Im a little confused. Are you telling me not to take the test untill I have gone up and flown?

If so, I agree. Im merely only going to be studying ahead so it will click the first time I go through my ground training. And as for the things, like you said, that I wont understand right now I will be asking my instructor when that time comes in class.

Thanks for the input. Everything helps.
 

youngflyer

Well-Known Member
youngflyer: Im a little confused. Are you telling me not to take the test untill I have gone up and flown?

If so, I agree. Im merely only going to be studying ahead so it will click the first time I go through my ground training. And as for the things, like you said, that I wont understand right now I will be asking my instructor when that time comes in class.

Thanks for the input. Everything helps.
Its your choice. I am just saying that your score MIGHT be a little bit lower if you have never been in a light airplane before. I took it before my training and passed, but not with flying colors. Now a lot of the concepts that I did not understand then I understand now with the relevant experience of actually flying. A pass is a pass however so I would take it before training if you know you can pass. Sorry for the confusion.
 

jdlilfan

Well-Known Member
I used the Rod Muchado's Private Pilot book as well as the ASA test prep book with the software (the software was free to me through school). The Rod Muchado is great for breaking things down to "average joe" knowledge.
 
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