What is FBO?...

Jeremy

New Member
Sorry about this stupid question, but I'm a little confused. I've seen people say "take the FBO route" or something like that.

From my research, an FBO is a "Fixed base operator"

Excerpt from Wikipedia:
"At a minimum, most FBOs offer aircraft fuel, oil, and parking, along with access to washroom and telephones. Some FBOs offer additional aircraft services such as hangar (indoor) storage, maintenance, aircraft charter or rental, flight training, deicing, and ground services such as towing and baggage handling."

What do they really have to do with piloting?
 

Clocks

Well-Known Member
"Take the FBO route" is in reference to flight training. Typically training at a local FBO has some benefits over an academy (like ATP) or a university (like UND). It's usually cheaper, allows more customized training, and is more flexible with scheduling.
 

Holocene

Well-Known Member
I would add that in general "taking the FBO route" refers to aquiring ratings under part 61 of the FARs.
 

DPApilot

GUYSH! GUYSH! GUYSH!
Sorry about this stupid question, but I'm a little confused. I've seen people say "take the FBO route" or something like that.

From my research, an FBO is a "Fixed base operator"

Excerpt from Wikipedia:
"At a minimum, most FBOs offer aircraft fuel, oil, and parking, along with access to washroom and telephones. Some FBOs offer additional aircraft services such as hangar (indoor) storage, maintenance, aircraft charter or rental, flight training, deicing, and ground services such as towing and baggage handling."

What do they really have to do with piloting?
by that, we refer to a FBO as a flight school or exct. for instance, you can do your flight training there and also end up becoming a CFI and working there. this is opposed to the college route, or the PFT route (to my understanding)
 

Nihon_Ni

Well-Known Member
"Take the FBO route" means go to your local airport and take flying lessons there instead of going to an academy.
 

Jeremy

New Member
So, since I'm in New Jersey, I could go to Philadelphia Airport or Atlantic City airport and they'd probably give lessons?

But shouldn't you still go to college?
 

VATechPilot

Well-Known Member
So, since I'm in New Jersey, I could go to Philadelphia Airport or Atlantic City airport and they'd probably give lessons?

But shouldn't you still go to college?
You are going to find that FBOs who offer flight training are at smaller airports, many times regional airports. I'm not sure where in Jersey you live, but FBOs of such are like these: http://www.flyingwairport.com/flight_school.dws and http://www.classicairservices.com/index.html. Just ask around and search the Internet to find nearby FBOs that offer flight training that will fit you well.

GO TO COLLEGE!! It always looks good on a resume, gives you life experience, makes you a more well-rounded educated person, and it may lead you to something outside of aviation. I know of a few people who wanted to become pilots but found something better for them in college.
 

VATechPilot

Well-Known Member
Oh and if you do the FBO + college route, you can go about it anyway you like. Flight train during school, after school when you get a job, sometime after school when you have build up some money to pay for the training, or a combination of them all. I decided to do my training after college so that I could focus on my studies. My motto is: do not feel like you need to rush into it. Take your time, enjoy life, you'll have many years to fly.
 

Scandinavian13

New Member
Good motto.

Mine is:
Make sure things are lined up before moving across the country.
...or
Take the FBO route, but there's no need to rush.
 

jdlilfan

Well-Known Member
Some University/College flight programs do not have their own aircraft and farm out the actual flight training to FBOs; like mine.
Same with my employer. Part 61 contractor for a University. We actually have a cheaper rate for them compared to "off the street".
 
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