UAL newlywed dies in Colorado crash

bLizZuE

Working the high speed buffet to happy hour.

There are no survivors from a plane crash that occurred Monday evening in southwest Colorado.

According to the San Miguel County Sheriff's Office, two bodies were recovered at about 6:25 PM on Monday from a privately-owned Beechcraft Bonanza aircraft that crashed in Ingram Basin just east of Telluride.

The two victims of the plane crash have been identified as Costas John Sivyllis, 30, and his wife Lindsey Vogelaar, 33, both of Port Orange, Florida.

The newlyweds tragically died just four days after eloping in Telluride during a small mountain wedding held on October 1. In days leading up to the fatal accident, the couple had been documenting their adventurous honeymoon online for family and friends to follow along. Both also worked in the airline industry, Sivyllis a United Airlines pilot and a flight instructor.


It is believed the aircraft crashed 10 to 15 minutes after departing at about 12:45 PM from the Telluride Airport (TEX). The couple was headed back to Florida with a possible fuel stop in Oklahoma.

Following the crash, Black Bear Pass closed for recovery efforts. Ingram Basin can be accessed along Black Bear Pass, which reaches a high point of 12,840 feet above sea level.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board have been notified and will take over the investigation.
 

Cherokee_Cruiser

Well-Known Member
Very tragic :(

The name sounds familiar, I’ve seen it in ALPA. I think he was one of the volunteers for the education / Cleared to Dream initiative. So heartbreaking, just 4 days after being married :(
 

turbomax97

What can brown do for you?
Oh 2020. You could have skipped this one. RIP Costas and Lindsey. The best ones go early.:(
 

BigZ

Well-Known Member
Wondered why the name sounded familiar. 9 mutual FB friends from the same bunch of people means we probably crossed paths at some point.
RIP and tailwinds
 

Acadia

Well-Known Member
Sorry for your loss for those who knew him/her.

Anyone familiar with this area? Track looks a lot like getting stuck in a valley you can't climb out of, but I have no familiarity with the area.

Sorry to see this.

I know the area fairly well, though it has been years since I lived in Telluride. I think you need to clear close to 13,000' feet to go via Black Bear Pass. The whole valley is pretty narrow with maybe a half mile or so between the quickly rising terrain. I would not think an east departure would would afford a whole lot of time to climb for a light piston, but I have no mountain flying experience and I never flew into our out of the airport there.
 

GypsyPilot

Well-Known Member
Western Colorado is scary in a piston single. I trained in the Front Range (i.e. Denver), and did a mountain flying class. I also flew the CRJ 700 out of DEN/ASE/EGE and some of the other mountain airports for several years, both as a FO and CA.

Absolutely nothing I did as a 121 pilot in Colorado is relevant to flying GA ASEL in Colorado. So many hazards out there, I think in some ways it’s even more dangerous than Alaska.
 

bike21

9-5 Ruins Lives
Sorry to see this.

I know the area fairly well, though it has been years since I lived in Telluride. I think you need to clear close to 13,000' feet to go via Black Bear Pass. The whole valley is pretty narrow with maybe a half mile or so between the quickly rising terrain. I would not think an east departure would would afford a whole lot of time to climb for a light piston, but I have no mountain flying experience and I never flew into our out of the airport there.
Was sad to see this, seemed like a truly wonderful gent. RIP.

I always taught and operated departing west first out of there, didn't favor the east option with only ~10 miles to climb. That saddle is indeed right about 13,000' so being above 14k to confidently cross is key.
 

ozone

Well-Known Member
Sorry to see this.

I know the area fairly well, though it has been years since I lived in Telluride. I think you need to clear close to 13,000' feet to go via Black Bear Pass. The whole valley is pretty narrow with maybe a half mile or so between the quickly rising terrain. I would not think an east departure would would afford a whole lot of time to climb for a light piston, but I have no mountain flying experience and I never flew into our out of the airport there.
For my own learning....in retrospect, could he have circled over the airport for a few rounds in order to gain altitude before trying to fly out of the immediate area? The initial left looping turn looks as if he could have continued that pattern a few more times.

Like others have commented on, the track looks as if he got boxed into a narrow rising canyon.
 

Murdoughnut

Well sized member
For my own learning....in retrospect, could he have circled over the airport for a few rounds in order to gain altitude before trying to fly out of the immediate area? The initial left looping turn looks as if he could have continued that pattern a few more times.

Like others have commented on, the track looks as if he got boxed into a narrow rising canyon.
Looks like it would be too narrow for a shuttle climb, but I'll let someone with better knowledge respond. Certainly wasn't making that turn from the center of the valley if the track is correct.
 

ozone

Well-Known Member
It also looks as if he had followed the river downstream to the northeast, he would have encountered terrain in the 8000's instead of the 10,000's
 

Baronman

Well-Known Member
Look at Google Earth 3-D heading East is eye opening. Sorry to see such a seemingly nice young couple on a cool adventure perish. At least they were together.
 

ChasenSFO

hen teaser
Though I didn't know them, it pains me to see several of my friends so devastated by this horrific news. Such a tragic story, their whole lives ahead of them and on the cusp of dreams coming true. For those of you who knew them, I am terribly, terribly sorry that you're dealing with this loss in these already awful times.
 
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