Television Show?

production

New Member
Hi All!

My company specializes in long-form documentary series for cable and network broadcasters...We do some 50-60 hours of programming a year, and we’re considering developing a show about Freight Dogs.

It is still the early stages, but we are interested in developing a program exploring the work and lives of Freight Dogs that educates and entertains.

Again, we're only in the very early stages of development, so there is a lot of room to take this in a number of directions. I am posting to see whether or not there is any interest in such a project, and also to gather as much information as I can so that we can really start thinking this through.

A few questions to throw out to the wild:

1) Who do “Freight Dogs” work for?

2) Where are some of the best “Freight Dog” watering holes?

3) Is the cargo often interesting or unusual?

4) Do you have any awesome stories?

5) Are there any legendary “Freight Dogs” still flying?


Thank you so much! I really look forward to hearing from you!
 

fly02

Well-Known Member
I would not want a camera anywhere near me or my airplane. That is just opening the door to certificate action for the smallest little mistake.
 

Polar742

All the responsibility none of the authority
1) Who do “Freight Dogs” work for?
Freight Companies that fly airplanes

2) Where are some of the best “Freight Dog” watering holes?
Nice Try

3) Is the cargo often interesting or unusual?
Occasionally, at best

4) Do you have any awesome stories?
Yes

5) Are there any legendary “Freight Dogs” still flying?
Yes


Thank you so much! I really look forward to hearing from you!
Saw your post on the other board from England. These are probably as specific answers as you're going to get.

I think Men's Esquire did a piece that can answer alot of your "research" questions.
 

BajtheJino

I'm looking at you.
I would not want a camera anywhere near me or my airplane. That is just opening the door to certificate action for the smallest little mistake.
That bad, eh?


I think it would be interesting to see all levels of freight-from the Lances, 210's and such all the way through the non-UPS, FedEx heavy's out there. I took some people on some runs in the 'Van and to this day I can recall their expressions...
 

spilot

Well-Known Member
I think it could be an interesting program to watch, and if made properly, perhaps buy on DVD to watch and think back to the freight experience, now that I'm being made unemployed. So I sent the dude a PM. But I also think much of what is done to deliver boxes, has no place on recorded medium that the FAA can get a hold of.

Also, if trying to capture on film, what it looks like to be in a dark cockpit, surrounded by the stars, the moon, and to reproduce for the viewer, the spatial impression of flying through clouds you don't really see because of the darkness, the sensation of speed coming from the glimpses of rain and cloud you see in strobe light flashes, and how it is flying by reference to instruments in really bad weather; you'd probably need some prohibitively expensive cameras, clean windshields or some kind of 250mph wind+rain resistant external mounting of cameras....not likely to be good.
 

Polar742

All the responsibility none of the authority
Your "research" awaits: http://www.mensvogue.com/business/blackbook/articles/2008/03/freight_dogs I know the CA from the first story, so while it's a typical article embellished where the story will sell, there are some elements of truth to it. I won't say which ones, cause we don't do specials on producers if you catch my drift.


Here's a picture I took last night of the view:


Just after takeoff out of Seoul:


Looking south into the South China Sea:



Approaching Shanghi:


At the gate in Shanghi:
 

Boris Badenov

Just running in to a burning house...
You need to understand that the FAA has a long and storied history of certificate action against high-visibility targets. The simple truth is that if they try hard enough, the Feds can probably find something to bust a pilot on during most any flight. The corollary of this is that pilots, particularly in freight (for reasons which I will leave to your imagination), tend to be extremely leery of publicizing or inviting oversight of their operations. My best guess would be that you would be hard pressed to find a company that will invite you in to their cockpits. And I can guarantee that you will not find anyone admitting their employer or telling "great stories" if you're lucky enough to find one of the "secret freightdog hangouts". This is not out of hostility, but out of a very appropriate and deep concern for continued employment.

If you want to pursue it further, I would recommend that you approach the managment of a company you find interesting and ask them to talk to pilots "on background". Even then, forgive me, but I won't be an interviewee. Best of luck.
 
R

Roger, Roger

Guest
You could always ask the new CEO of Airnet. I'm sure if one of their pilots got violated he'd love an excuse to get rid of another one.
 
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