Study for CFI?

kevmor99

Well-Known Member
I always hear that there is a lot of studying for the CFI, what would you recommend? I know there is the FAA publications (FAR/AIM, PHAK, Airplane Flying Handbook, Aviation Instructors Handbook, which goes over FOI I think, Weight & Balance...) Would you recommend any online courses, videos, etc? What am I missing?

Thanks

(btw, I've taken AGI already, but not the FIA)
 

Stomp16

You mean Shennanigans?!?!
Start making your lesson plans now. They take a lot of time and are a pain in the arse. Also, the FOI is long and it takes a ton of studying. Most of it is rote memorization and boring so it's hard to stay focused. Also, the ASA test prep is a good starting point.
 

todd405

Well-Known Member
I found that the FAA publications helped me the best. Also, the inspectors that I delt with seemed to be pleased when I threw down a stack of their books on the table before my oral. I did purchase a video course through King Schools for the CFI and FOI. It was pretty informative and did help me for the writtens. However, they were quite expensive and looking back I probably could have done without them. Good Luck in your training and study hard!!!!!
 

JulietBravo

On Call, On Demand
For my ride with the Feds, I just studied the FOI, Airplane flying handbook, Pilots handbook of Aero Knowledge, FAR/AIM, ASA Oral Guide, and the PTS. Pretty straight forward stuff. I didn't see a need at all to go and get videos, DVDs, or whatever else. As for my lesson plans, I just went through each manuevar from the Airplane flying handbook and made my own from the way I was taught on how to do them. Nothing too bad, just a lot of information to comprehend.
 

sdfcvoh

This is my Custom Title
Ditto everything said so far. I just passed my CFI-oral Monday, and I can attest to the importance of having lesson plans that are detailed for every single task in the PTS being worth their weight in gold.

Also, the PTS lists reference books (PHAK, AFH, etc.) as well as a lot of AC's. Get them ALL. Don't go to the checkride without them. I was able to print off most of the AC's on my computer (about 500 pages). But just bite the bullet and purchase the books. They are worth it. They are also available online on the FAA website, although you should have a hard copy of them.

Read the AIM and use it as a reference. Be extremely familiar with the FARs (your FAR/AIM should look like a xmas tree with all the colored tags sticking out of it.)

It is a ton of studying, and prepping, and you will learn a crazy amount of new knowledge. Be open minded, too.

Find a CFI who has been doing their job for a long time to assist you.

And GOOD LUCK! Study hard and commit to the job at hand - you will do very well as long as you do all of that!:)
 

cfii2007

New Member
I made two BIG binders for my CFI...one with lesson plans and the other with AC circulars.

Use the aforementioned books as reference tools, start making lesson plans NOW and maybe practice teaching someone.
 

Stomp16

You mean Shennanigans?!?!
In addition to the lesson plans on paper, I also did 3 on Power Point and taught rectangular course to the examiner. He was really impressed with the visual learning instead of just an explanation. Food for thought I guess.....:D
 

sdfcvoh

This is my Custom Title
In addition to the lesson plans on paper, I also did 3 on Power Point and taught rectangular course to the examiner. He was really impressed with the visual learning instead of just an explanation. Food for thought I guess.....:D
Big nod to the visuals. Examiners REALLY like to see that - and the FOI recommends them.
 

John Proctor

Well-Known Member
I'm in the same boat you are. I am studying for my CFI right now. I used the Gleim FOI book to study for the FOI exam and passed with a 100%. I'm using the Gleim Flight Instructor book to prepare for the CFI written, which I am planning on taking in the next couple of weeks. Anyways, good luck and I wish you the best.
 

bdhill1979

Gone West
I'm in the same boat you are. I am studying for my CFI right now. I used the Gleim FOI book to study for the FOI exam and passed with a 100%. I'm using the Gleim Flight Instructor book to prepare for the CFI written, which I am planning on taking in the next couple of weeks. Anyways, good luck and I wish you the best.
Well there is a name from my sign off record...one that has a "Passed" next to it.

How did I miss you joining?
 

Maurus

The Great Gazoo
Use the PTS as a guide and make lesson plans. Try to get a gouge on the examiner.
I wouldn't get a gouge on the examiner. Yes it would make the ride easier, but stressing on all topics instead of just the ones the examiner covers will only limit what you learn and if you would go with another examiner you would fail. Study to pass anyone's checkride and you will be a better CFI out of the experience.
 

CoffeeIcePapers

Well-Hung Member
I wouldn't get a gouge on the examiner. Yes it would make the ride easier, but stressing on all topics instead of just the ones the examiner covers will only limit what you learn and if you would go with another examiner you would fail. Study to pass anyone's checkride and you will be a better CFI out of the experience.
Where did I say to not be prepared for the oral exam? Some FSDO guys are notorious for stressing small things on the checkride and failing people on it. It is ALWAYS better to go to a checkride knowing what the examiner wants to see.

It is a big dog and pony show anyways. At the Commercial level, you already knew most of the knowledge, anyways. Learning how to actually teach will come after you get the license.
 

youngpilot85

New Member
Well besides religiously studying the CFI oral exam guide, what I found also helped me quite a bit were some online courses (free by the way) which I took online. There are two websites I used. The first was AOPA's website (www.aopa.org), on which they have some very helpfull online courses in various topics such as Runway Safety, Flight Service, Essential Aerodymics (I definitely recommend taking this one), and a bunch of weather courses. They each don't last more than an hour. What I did was, I took one a day for about a week.

The other website is the FAA's Safety Website (www.faasafety.gov). They too have a bunch of relavant online courses you can sit at your convinience, lasting no more than 30 minutes at a time. One of the things these examiners like to see on the checkride is that you are able to supplement your knowledge with outside references. Not only does that make you more knowledgable as an instructor, but it also shows that you are able to expand your horizons.

That's the best advice I can give bro. Wherever you can gain some additional knowledge prior to the checkride, do so. Good luck!!!

YP
 

Beech driver

Well-Known Member
Human being are a creature of habit. Once you get into one, it is hard to break. If you have access to a gouge, I say use it.

When I went into my CFI ride I had and used a gouge for the examiner. Did he cover what was on the gouge? He did to a tee. However, he also covered other things as well. My best advice, study with all the free time you have. The ground portion of my checkride was far easier than I expected. The only thing he really caught me on was MELs. And that was due to him asking a question in a way I did not fully understand. Once I did, the ground was over. When you are making your lesson plans, I recommend making a section for notes/pictures. This will make the plan much easier to deliver when you can glance at the picture if you get stuck.

As far as the FOI. I made flash cards and put them in my car. I put what I was studying on the front center with the acrynym (spl?) on the bottom right. As I flipped over a card, my thumb covered the acrynym. Thus I had to remember both the acrynym and answers.
DISCLAIMER: Not always safe, use your judgement when to take your eyes off traffic.
 
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