Space Shuttle Lost

darrenf

resident denizen
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Holy crap.


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You Just wrote The Onion's next headline Doug.

What a sad day. I am ready for the conspiracy theories to come fast and furious now, since this was the first mission with an Israeli on board and on an anniversary of Challenger.
 

Derg

New Arizona, Il Duce/Warlord
Staff member
...and there's apparently debris is Palestine, TX.

The Art Bell show's going to love this one...
 

chunk75

Well-Known Member
Let's all keep our thoughts and prayers with the crew's family and friends...God bless them.


Chunk
 

Derg

New Arizona, Il Duce/Warlord
Staff member
I remember back in 1986 thinking the day before the Challenger exploded, "There's a shuttle launching tomorrow? Wow I didn't hear anything about that".

Then just yesterday I asked Kristie when the shuttle was supposed to launch with the high profile crew onboard and she told me that it had already launched.

Then this morning I'm lying in bed and my brother calls from California. Now my brother is rarely up before 10am and I figured I'd better pick up the telephone because it's important.

He says, "turn on the news..."

"Huh?! What's going on?"

"Turn on the news".

Then about three thoughts ran through my brain: "Large scale terrorist strike? Delta jet disaster? Massive assault on Iraq?"

Ack.
 

Hurricane

New Member
A horrible, horrible tradgedy.

Remember the Challenger crew survived until impact with the water....hopefully there are survivors. It is still a search and rescue mission, folks.

I fear that is wishful hoping, though.

 

Androol

New Member
Sad.

I always wanted to be an astronaut. I am one at heart. My heart goes out to all in the NASA family. I have only felt like this twice before: January 28, 1986 - The Challenger disaster, and Septmeber 11, 2001. What more can anyone say?
 

Jason

Well-Known Member
I would like to think that as well but 200,000+ feet and 12,500 mph - that's not even close to the survivable envelope.

May God be with them and their families.

Jason
 

727PFE

New Member
How sad. I just talked to my kids, they are in Titusville, Fl. They wondered why they didn't hear it. I told them the truth over the phone. I've got a lot of friends in the space program, this is going to hurt, for a long, long time. The only ones who didn't feel anything where the crewmembers. I'm told that in an inflight break up, the G forces make a person black out almost instantly, I sure hope so. Anyway, I will still encourage my kids to become astronauts.
 

Derg

New Arizona, Il Duce/Warlord
Staff member
I'm honest with my nephew when he asked me about flying. I always tell him that it's safe primarily because of the highly trained professionals involved in aviation.

I talk about the backup systems, training and how you always have to have a 'plan B' in case sometime bad happens, but sometimes, things just go wrong.
 

kyleking1

New Member
Im in Huntsville, Texas and heard the loud bang this morning, which is what woke me up around Id say 7:50 or so. Huntsville is 70 miles north of Houston and 170 south of Dallas on interstate 45. We've already talked to our parents in Corsicana, 45 miles south of Dallas who heard the same "bang" we did. Reports say the shuttle was over the DFW area, but there has already been reports on the Houston news down here about debris being found in Nacogdoches, Texas, which is in deep southeast Texas. Ill post more as I here more on the news from down here.
 

davetheflyer

New Member
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I am ready for the conspiracy theories to come fast and furious now, since this was the first mission with an Israeli on board and on an anniversary of Challenger

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And CNN said that Ilan Ramon, the Israeli on board, was one of the IAF pilots who bombed the Iraqi nuclear reactor in 1981. How's that for a coincidence?

I know that terrorism is the first thing to come to mind when a tragedy occurs these days, but I think that it is highly unlikely in this case.

NASA has been operating on a shoestring budget for years with a philosophy of better, faster, cheaper. That may have had something to do with the crash. It's just too early to say.

The radio was also reporting that human remains have been found, but they didn't say where. They did say that the debris field covers Texas, Louisiana, and Arkansas.

It is definitely a tragic day.
 

PurduePilot

New Member
When President Regean gave his speech in the Challenger aftermath on January 28, 1986 he said, "...The future doesn't belong to the fainthearted; it belongs to the brave." I think those words are applicable to the Columbia crew.

This is a very sad day. I have met a lot of people who work for United Space Alliance (USA) and each person is extremely proud of what they do and their dedication is unsurpassed in any industry. My heart goes out to the families of the fallen astronauts.
 

H46Bubba

Well-Known Member
First off. God Bless them all for their dedication, effort, and time, in man's pursuit for the stars, for they are now belong to the stars. Such a sad start to the day. It sort of hits home for me. My Grandmother has been involved with the Space program since Apollo. She worked at Rockwell and worked on both the Apollo capsules as well as all the shuttles. I was able to see Endeavor while it was being built. When something like this happens, it hits home to all those who built the shuttle, NASA workers, and Astonauts, past and present alike. Keep those brave people and their families in your prayers.
 

darrenf

resident denizen
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The radio was also reporting that human remains have been found, but they didn't say where. They did say that the debris field covers Texas, Louisiana, and Arkansas.

It is definitely a tragic day.

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With all the misinformation going around the media at this time, I would be surprised if they truly did find human remains this quickly. Actually I would be shocked if any part large enough to recognize ever made it to the ground. And since when are Hydrogen and Oxygen toxic substances that will suffocate you within 48 hours as reported on the "always accurate" CNN. And now I am hearing about flight restrictions set up across Texas, Louisiana, and Arkansas?? Another knee jerk reaction if you ask me, though maybe I am reacting to quick as well, as I don't know the extent of the restrictions yet. AOPA's website at the moment has no mention of them.

D
 

John2375

New Member
I awoke this morning so excited to have the first chance ever to see
the re-entry as it passed over Las Vegas, NV. I've seen launches, from
3.5 miles, 12 miles...I've seen ascents from Massachusetts, I've seen
it in orbit, attached to the ISS...Mir, I've seen landings in person,
but to see it streak across the sky was something to look forward to.
I was struck by the speed - normally a "full sky" pass takes 4-5
minutes, travelling Mach 25 at 240 miles up...but at Mach 22 at only
60 miles or so, it took only 1 minute 30 seconds to go across the sky
- just amazing - I took binoculars and focused in on the orange
fireball surrounding the object, the orbiter...and the plasma streak
was breathtaking - I was so excited to know I would walk inside,
update the mission journal, watch the landing, and move on with the
day - I'm always so pumped up for life after a launch and landing.
Then, the loss of comm. worried me, then at 9:16 and it wasn't at KSC,
I knew it was gone - the images shortly afterward told the whole
story...I'm still watching in dis belief.
Not Columbia...not in this day and age...just...speechless.

John
 
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