Simulated Instrument in Sim for PPL

youngflyer

Well-Known Member
I understand that I can log up to 2.5 hours in the Sim for the PPL so would it be possible to log simulated instrument in the sim to satisfy the 1.8 hours I have left of simulated instrument in the plane.
 

charlie1017

Well-Known Member
Do it in the real thing... The instrument training for PPL is meant to save your life should you venture into IMC. The sim won't replicate the sensations that could lead to spatial disorientation so its value for training at this stage would be limited IMHO.
 

TXaviator

Well-Known Member
agreed. the sensation you get the first time you go plowing into a cloud can be / will be / IS very very 'weird' to say the least.

get some experience in the plane, it could save your life. not an area to save pennies on, IMHO.
 

youngflyer

Well-Known Member
The thing is, I have already been in actual IMC for 1.3 already and have experienced spatial disorientation. I figure I will do it in the plane just to be safe though.
 

Maurus

The Great Gazoo
Have your instructor do it on the way out to the practice area, once out there he hsould have you do turns which will result as being clearing turns and then the needed maneuvers according to the lesson you are on. Saves you money and time.

This way you will get straight and level flight, standard rate turns, climbs, and then the required maneuvers. Need descents? Put it on no the wya back home :nana2:
 

CoffeeIcePapers

Well-Hung Member
You can't count the 2.5 hours in the sim towards the 3 hours of instrument time. It specifically says "in the airplane" and does not say simulated instrument time.

3 hours of flight training in a single-engine airplane on the control and maneuvering of an airplane solely by reference to instruments, including straight and level flight, constant airspeed climbs and descents, turns to a heading, recovery from unusual flight attitudes, radio communications, and the use of navigation systems/facilities and radar services appropriate to instrument flight;
 

nosehair

Well-Known Member
You can, however, use 2.5 hours of sim time towards the total time requirement. Re: 61.109(k)(1)

You do need at least 3 hours in the airplane, but a valuable way of gaining experience in a sim is to practice ATC procedures that you might do to get down out of clouds. Note also that this sim time must be with an "authorized instructor", which means an Instrument Instructor. The 3 hours of "aircraft control by reference to instruments" in an airplane do not have to be with an instrument instructor.
 

DeltaAVL

New Member
Put aside your 2.5 hours of sim time for days when you get to the airport and can't fly due to weather, maintenance, etc.

That's what I'm doing...
 

captainphil

Well-Known Member
The thing is, I have already been in actual IMC for 1.3 already and have experienced spatial disorientation. I figure I will do it in the plane just to be safe though.
What happens when you get spacially disoriented? I have yet to do instrument in clouds.
 

Flying Accountant

Well-Known Member
Do it in the real thing... The instrument training for PPL is meant to save your life should you venture into IMC. The sim won't replicate the sensations that could lead to spatial disorientation so its value for training at this stage would be limited IMHO.
I agree 100% here. Trying flying in IMC at night without actual instrument training. Talking about creepy.:panic:
 

Flying Accountant

Well-Known Member
What happens when you get spacially disoriented? I have yet to do instrument in clouds.
When you get spatially disoriented....your mind is telling you "Hey..the airplane is flying straight and level" but in reality the airplane is banking left/right and/or climbing or descending. Without reference to instruments...you'd be in deep doo.

At night time it can be very dangerous. Just ask anyone who has flown in and out of Cedar Key, FL at night time. The pilots there call that airport the "Airplane Graveyard".
 

PGT

Well-Known Member
I knocked out the simulated real quick while doing X/C's. Usually on they last leg (out of 3) when we were headed home.

A member on her said the worst time he experienced spatial disorientation was in a jet with a full glass cockpit, that is after they flew freight for a while. I don't know if I'll ever get used to the feeling.
 

yoman793

Well-Known Member
you can use sim time to count towards the required 3 hours of instrument time for your ppl. however, the time in the sim does not count as total time towards your ppl license, only counts for the simulated instrument time. i think its only 2 or 2.5 though. some has to be done in the plane under the hood.
 

TXaviator

Well-Known Member
What happens when you get spacially disoriented? I have yet to do instrument in clouds.

basically, what your body is telling you is "up"....actually might be "left" "right" or "down"!! its a weird feeling that can easily get the best of a pilot who has not trained and studied flight only by reference to instruments.

you may think you still "feel" like youre upright or straight and level, but you could infact be in all kinds of really bad positions or orientations!
 

PGT

Well-Known Member
What happens when you get spacially disoriented? I have yet to do instrument in clouds.
For me it felt like I was in a 45 degree bank to the left while I was in fact straight and level.
Also flying in actual imc wears you out real quick (with no ap); it's just a constant scan of the primary and secondary instruments.
 

CoffeeIcePapers

Well-Hung Member
you can use sim time to count towards the required 3 hours of instrument time for your ppl. however, the time in the sim does not count as total time towards your ppl license, only counts for the simulated instrument time. i think its only 2 or 2.5 though. some has to be done in the plane under the hood.
You are wrong. I postedvthe reg above.
 

SlantG

Well-Known Member
A variation on the spatial disorientation theme is positional disorientation: You're flying, you know where up is, you know your heading, you're doing everything properly by trusting your flight instruments and navigation instruments including the GPS moving map display, but you absolutely know for the next hour you are going the wrong way because you know without a doubt Van Nuys is EAST of Pomona (it's northwest!).

Great fun!
 

yoman793

Well-Known Member
You are wrong. I postedvthe reg above.

:) no sir, i am right. check the manual on your faa approved FTD or approved flight simulator and you will see what the faa says the sim time can be used for. i always liked being told i am flat out wrong. makes you feel good. :)
 
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