Side Jobs on the Road/Reserve

berge7f9

Well-Known Member
I am trying to find a non-flying related backup plan to make my long-term airline career feasible. I am thinking about getting an online degree, most likely as an MBA or MS in Finance. However, it seems that in order to take advantage of that extra degree, I would have to quit my present airline career.

I am wondering how many people have a side job that they can work while they are waiting on reserve or from the internet. These time periods would make it easier for me to maintain my present career while also having some security to make up for a career that long-term is very insecure.
 

bike21

9-5 Ruins Lives
I do web design on the side, plus build and sell lamps made out of old bike parts. I am also considering getting a job at a bike shop when I get based back home since I will be on reserve for quite some time. I have some other things 'in the works' as well, but they are bigger and will take some time to get going.

I think you are on the right track already by thinking ahead and being ready with a plan B, C, D, etc... Find something you like and go for it. Pilots do anything from running car washes to doing taxes on the side. Find something that makes sense for you and make it happen. Good luck!
 
I drop skydivers on my off days. Mind you I only fly about 20 hours a month on reserve so no duty limits to really be concerned with.
 

kellwolf

Piece of Trash
I drop skydivers on my off days. Mind you I only fly about 20 hours a month on reserve so no duty limits to really be concerned with.
Duty limits or not, most regionals will NOT allow you to do that since it's still considered commercial flying. I know Pinnacle won't unless you've got express written consent from the chief pilot. Doesn't matter if you fly 60 hours a year or 1000 hours a year. It's in the FOM.
 

WacoFan

Bigly
Here is an idea that can be done on the road, on reserve, or at home on reserve. It can also be done during layovers, etc. This would also be great for anyone that is currently, or facing a furlough.

Medical Billing. I know everyone has seen the spam that is sent about "working from home" and "medical billing at home", etc. I was always leary of these, but I can tell you for certain that becoming a certified medical coder, or transcriptionist is a legitimate online job that you can do that will bring decent coin. You can find online courses to gain this employment as well - just be careful with that. I know that Missouri will actually pay for your you to do this training if you are laid off.

I am on the Board of a big hospital, and some of the medical groups we have are outsourcing their billing and coding to people. One woman, who is not only a certified coder but also an auditor is making an outrageous sum - checks going out weekly to her around $5k. It would take time to get to her level, but many people can pick up an extra $25 - $50k. Coder would probably be best - you get paid by the bill processes, not by the hour - so you could get fast and do pretty well. It doesn't matter if you are doing this at 2:00 am or noon...just download a group of bills, work on them, and then submit. Seems pretty flexible, with good pay, and there is a huge need for it.

I have just exhausted most of my knowledge. If interested, look into a community college or perhaps University of Phoenix - don't go for something that seems pretty shady - go to a reputable place that has placement help when completed.
 

bronco21016

I know H.T.M.L. (How To Meet Ladies)
I've been tossing around the idea of becoming a certified financial planner. Only problem is the 2,000 hours of experience before getting the cert. It would take a few years to accumulate that doing it on days off.
 

flyviper

Well-Known Member
Here is an idea that can be done on the road, on reserve, or at home on reserve. It can also be done during layovers, etc. This would also be great for anyone that is currently, or facing a furlough.

Medical Billing. I know everyone has seen the spam that is sent about "working from home" and "medical billing at home", etc. I was always leary of these, but I can tell you for certain that becoming a certified medical coder, or transcriptionist is a legitimate online job that you can do that will bring decent coin. You can find online courses to gain this employment as well - just be careful with that. I know that Missouri will actually pay for your you to do this training if you are laid off.

I am on the Board of a big hospital, and some of the medical groups we have are outsourcing their billing and coding to people. One woman, who is not only a certified coder but also an auditor is making an outrageous sum - checks going out weekly to her around $5k. It would take time to get to her level, but many people can pick up an extra $25 - $50k. Coder would probably be best - you get paid by the bill processes, not by the hour - so you could get fast and do pretty well. It doesn't matter if you are doing this at 2:00 am or noon...just download a group of bills, work on them, and then submit. Seems pretty flexible, with good pay, and there is a huge need for it.

I have just exhausted most of my knowledge. If interested, look into a community college or perhaps University of Phoenix - don't go for something that seems pretty shady - go to a reputable place that has placement help when completed.

This seems like a good gig on the side..thanks for posting!
 

JayAre

Well-Known Member
Well Im just a freight dawg but during my dayover(layover) now, I work at the family business. Doing purchasing and inventory mgmt. Eventually I expect to quit my flying job and return back to the business.
 

WacoFan

Bigly
I've been tossing around the idea of becoming a certified financial planner. Only problem is the 2,000 hours of experience before getting the cert. It would take a few years to accumulate that doing it on days off.
The biggest problem in this field wouldn't even be the 2000 hrs of experience. It would be, how do you find the clientele? This is a sales job - nobody is going to hire a CFP and pay them a salary, particularly part time. Much like sales, accounting, or law you will need to find a client base, and then do good work for them. Who would hire a band new, part time CPF/Pilot?

Don't mean to rain on your parade, but being a CFP is a full time deal unless you have rich family that you can have as clients.
 

JaceTheAce

Well-Known Member
I do BPOs (Broker Price Opinions) for a realty and appraisal company on my overnights and on long 6 hour commutes across the country.
 

bronco21016

I know H.T.M.L. (How To Meet Ladies)
The biggest problem in this field wouldn't even be the 2000 hrs of experience. It would be, how do you find the clientele? This is a sales job - nobody is going to hire a CFP and pay them a salary, particularly part time. Much like sales, accounting, or law you will need to find a client base, and then do good work for them. Who would hire a band new, part time CPF/Pilot?

Don't mean to rain on your parade, but being a CFP is a full time deal unless you have rich family that you can have as clients.
Like I said... just tossing the idea around. I'm glad you gave some input.

The only person I've talked to who does this is my girlfriend's cousin. He makes decent money, works from home, and sets his own hours which is usually very few hours. I haven't looked into it all that much yet. I'm glad someone started this thread though. Hopefully I'll find some good ideas that would work.
 

WacoFan

Bigly
Like I said... just tossing the idea around. I'm glad you gave some input.

The only person I've talked to who does this is my girlfriend's cousin. He makes decent money, works from home, and sets his own hours which is usually very few hours. I haven't looked into it all that much yet. I'm glad someone started this thread though. Hopefully I'll find some good ideas that would work.
As I said, particularly in the begining it is a full time job. Lots of competition too. Thing about Financial planning is the your first 5 years or so you will be dramatically underpaid relative to hours and effort. If you make it that long, it switches to overpaid - you can work hard, coast, whatever you want. Think hard about it - if you want to do it and have a passion for helping people accumulate and manage wealth, like to study a lot, and enjoy asking people to trust you (most will say no - it is a numbers game to get clients) then you may find it is rewarding. My negativity was based primarliy on the "part-time" aspect - I simply don't think anyone can build a practice that way considering all the time it takes to learn and pass tests, build clientelle, etc. Good luck to you whatever you do!
 
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