Part 61 Commercial Checkride

stuckingfk

Well-Known Member
I just finished my commercial oral at UND (part 141). I have the ride tomorrow in an arrow and if I pass, I won't receive the certificate until I finish the last course here (which is very stupid in my opinion).

I guess my question is, if I were to go take the ride with a DE, does it have to be in a complex aircraft? Or can I take it in a 172 or any other fixed-gear aircraft?
 

EatSleepFly

Well-Known Member
Yeah, it has to be a complex airplane if its your initial Commercial.

Why won't they give you your certificate as soon as you've passed?
 

pilot602

If specified, this will replace the title that
You may not be eligible to take a part 61 ride if you've done all your training under 141. You may not have the total time and/or specific cross country/training/experience requirements.
 

stuckingfk

Well-Known Member
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Why won't they give you your certificate as soon as you've passed?

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It is how they do that here and it is one of the most idiotic things I have ever heard of. I have gone through the instrument and commercial training here, but I won't get my ticket until I finish the multi instrument course (which is mighty spendy).

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You may not be eligible to take a part 61 ride if you've done all your training under 141. You may not have the total time and/or specific cross country/training/experience requirements.

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If I did it part 61, I would have the requirements because of all the Frasca time that I have, which would put me over 250 tt. I suppose I should look up in the FAR's for what else I need. But for TT, I will be ok.
 

pilot602

If specified, this will replace the title that
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If I did it part 61, I would have the requirements because of all the Frasca time that I have, which would put me over 250 tt. I suppose I should look up in the FAR's for what else I need. But for TT, I will be ok.



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Only so much FTD time is useable under part 61 (a lot less than under 141). Plus you need two XCs with an instructor (one at night, one during the day) of two hours and at least 100 miles and then the big solo cross country with three stops one of which is at least 250nm straight line distance from the point of origin. if you've got that you're good to go. Just look it up here.
 

E_Dawg

Moderator
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I won't receive the certificate until I finish the last course here (which is very stupid in my opinion).

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LAME

I thought it was the FAA who gives you the cert, not your school
 

triplec76

Well-Known Member
You can take part of your checkride in a 172 and part of it in a complex aircraft. Thats what we do at our FBO because the only complex aircraft for rent is a 300HP Lance, so maneuvers are done in a 172 and performance take-offs and landings are done in the Lance.

By the way, I would have major problems with someone witholding a certficate if I have passed the appropriate oral and checkride. I dont care what their reasoning is. So what would happen if you got your commercial there and then dropped out or went to another school? It just doesnt make any sense at all.
 

EatSleepFly

Well-Known Member
Oh yeah, I know. Its just that most people would try to avoid taking any more checkrides than absolutely necessary...
 

triplec76

Well-Known Member
I know, its a pain in the ass. Its really all one checkride on the same day, its just switching out aircraft and moving your gear and whatnot.
 
G

Guest

Guest
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Plus you need two XCs with an instructor (one at night, one during the day) of two hours and at least 100 miles and then the big solo cross country with three stops one of which is at least 250nm straight line distance from the point of origin.

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As I am going through the same program as Ruppert I can say that he has all that. As far as I can tell we meet all the requirements for the part 61 check too.

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By the way, I would have major problems with someone witholding a certficate if I have passed the appropriate oral and checkride. I dont care what their reasoning is. So what would happen if you got your commercial there and then dropped out or went to another school? It just doesnt make any sense at all.

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What happens is that he will take this checkride with a stage check instructor, who is not neccesarily a DE. Technically he will be held to all the standards in the PTS but it will not be an "official" checkride.

I hate the way they do this here as well. IMHO I think it is just another money making scheme. In order to get your instrument and commercial ratings you are forced to stay and do all your training through the multi, which is probably the most profitable course for the school. This way it is not possible for someone to come in to the school, get their instrument rating then drop out and go somewhere else.

Sometimes it is tough to put up with all of the political BS that goes on here, but I just try and keep focused on my ultimate goal and it keeps me pushing foward.
 

E_Dawg

Moderator
Just curious,

Let's say you pass the Comm ride at your school, and get an offer to fly banner tows at the FBO across the way. Could you do it???

And can you fly instruments after you get your instrument rating over there?
 

stuckingfk

Well-Known Member
No you can't. Even the day you pass the final checkride, you'are still not able to fly as a commercial or instrument rated pilot until the school and the FAA give you are certifcates. There isn't a temporary issued.
 

mtsu_av8er

Well-Known Member
Hey....if you've finished the requirements, you can take the checkride with ANY DE. The school can't stop you from taking a practical test. They might be pissed, but they can't do anything to you....
 

stuckingfk

Well-Known Member
I know I could, but then I would have to retake the writtens, and pay for the DE. Both would suck, unless I quit here and then I would have to do it.
 

mtsu_av8er

Well-Known Member
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I know I could, but then I would have to retake the writtens, and pay for the DE. Both would suck, unless I quit here and then I would have to do it.

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Yeah, but it would sure beat the hell out of waiting until who-knows-when to use your certs. Depends on how long you'd have to wait, I suppose....
 

EDUC8-or

Well-Known Member
I think Riddle does something similar here. You pass the in house ride, 1/2 in a 172 and the other half in an Arrow, and then you do the same thing with a DE. I don't really see the point in flying two aircraft for a checkride. That also guarantees that the pattern here in DAB is saturated with Riddle Arrows doing short approaches. Nothing like being #6 for takeoff waiting for people who keep screwing up their power off 180's.

I have a friend who did his commercial at the old Riddle CATER program. The gentleman from the FAA insisted that he should know how to fly a complex airplane outside of the traffic pattern and made him do the whole ride in an Arrow. Needless to say, he busted the ride. I'm a big fan of learning how to fly one airplane for your checkride and sticking with it.
 

pilot602

If specified, this will replace the title that
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As I am going through the same program as Ruppert I can say that he has all that. As far as I can tell we meet all the requirements for the part 61 check too.

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I just wanted to make sure you guys new there was difference, that's all. So it wasn't a surprise.

If you meet the requirements go for it.
 

ready2fly

Well-Known Member
Well, FWIW - I'm doing my CSEL in a Warrior and then turning around and doing my CMEL either the same day or shortly thereafter.

It's my understanding that I can do the CSEL in a "non-complex" aircraft as I have already taken a checkride in the complex-twin.

Unless I'm missing something, where does CFR Title 14 say you have to do your initial commercial checkride in a complex aircraft?

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<font color="red">§ 61.123 Eligibility requirements: General.

To be eligible for a commercial pilot certificate, a person must:

(a) Be at least 18 years of age;

(b) Be able to read, speak, write, and understand the English language. If the applicant is unable to meet one of these requirements due to medical reasons, then the Administrator may place such operating limitations on that applicant's pilot certificate as are necessary for the safe operation of the aircraft.

(c) Receive a logbook endorsement from an authorized instructor who:

(1) Conducted the required ground training or reviewed the person's home study on the aeronautical knowledge areas listed in § 61.125 of this part that apply to the aircraft category and class rating sought; and

(2) Certified that the person is prepared for the required knowledge test that applies to the aircraft category and class rating sought.

(d) Pass the required knowledge test on the aeronautical knowledge areas listed in § 61.125 of this part;

(e) Receive the required training and a logbook endorsement from an authorized instructor who:

(1) Conducted the training on the areas of operation listed in § 61.127(b) of this part that apply to the aircraft category and class rating sought; and

(2) Certified that the person is prepared for the required practical test.

(f) Meet the aeronautical experience requirements of this subpart that apply to the aircraft category and class rating sought before applying for the practical test;

(g) Pass the required practical test on the areas of operation listed in § 61.127(b) of this part that apply to the aircraft category and class rating sought;

(h) Hold at least a private pilot certificate issued under this part or meet the requirements of § 61.73; and

(i) Comply with the sections of this part that apply to the aircraft category and class rating sought.

</font>

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I read in Sections 61.125, 61.127, 61.129 and 61.133 and nowhere is the term "complex aircraft" used.

If my instructor is wrong, then I want to be able to point it out to him.

Thanks
R2F
 
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