non turbojet, below 12.5 type rating?

butt

New Member
In the FARs it says (paraphrased) that any plane will need a type rating if it has a jet engine, is over 12,5000 pounds, or is otherwise determined by the FAA to need a type rating. Does anyone know of an example of a plane that requires a type-rating under the "FAA says so" clause of that regulation?
 

400A

New Member
In the FARs it says (paraphrased) that any plane will need a type rating if it has a jet engine, is over 12,5000 pounds, or is otherwise determined by the FAA to need a type rating. Does anyone know of an example of a plane that requires a type-rating under the "FAA says so" clause of that regulation?
I believe most WWII type airplanes do, ie P51, P38 etc.
 

Polar742

All the responsibility none of the authority
I believe most WWII type airplanes do, ie P51, P38 etc.
Not to be argumenative, caus I really am not sure, but I thought it was an LOA.

I'm about 90% sure I have no idea though.....
 

USMCmech

Well-Known Member
Not to be argumenative, cause I really am not sure, but I thought it was an LOA.

I'm about 90% sure I have no idea though.....

LOAs are not type ratings. Although they are similar, there are some differences.

First off, once you have an LOA in three different aircraft, you get an "unlimited LOA" which is good for almost anything.

Also, most of the "examinaiton" for an LOA in a some fighters (the P-51 for example) is done in an entirely different airplane usually a T-6 Texan. And it focuses on VFR manuvers and basic airmanship.


Basicly a type is a examinaiton of your knowledge of an airplane, and you ability to fly it IFR. This should not be beyond any compentent pilot who has recived sufficent training.

LOAs OTOH, are there to see if you can really handle this extreamly challanging airplane, and many pilots simply are not up to the task.
 

USMCmech

Well-Known Member
Back to the OP's question,

The MU-2 almost went that route, but the feds decided not to. However the training that they are now requireing is almost the same thing, except without the wrtiing on the back of your ticket.


Suposedly the Ayers Thrush 850 has a MGTOW over 12.5, and they somehow convinced the fed to waive the type requirement. That may be a ledgend however.
 

Bus Driver

Well-Known Member
Bill Lear tried to get around the 12,500 lb. rule by limiting the Lear 23 to 12,499, but the FAA said no way.
 

da10pilot

New Member
Back to the OP's question,

The MU-2 almost went that route, but the feds decided not to. However the training that they are now requireing is almost the same thing, except without the wrtiing on the back of your ticket.


Suposedly the Ayers Thrush 850 has a MGTOW over 12.5, and they somehow convinced the fed to waive the type requirement. That may be a ledgend however.
Yeah, the MU-2 does have a Special FAR for it that went into effect last year. But you're right, it's like getting a type-rating without the writing.
 

Polar742

All the responsibility none of the authority
LOAs are not type ratings. Although they are similar, there are some differences...
I knew that the type and LOA are different. I just wrote incorrectly. The post should have read "Not to be argumentative (sp), cause(sp) I really am not sure, but I thought was an LOA was required to opreate warbirds, not necessarily a type.

I'm about 90% sure I have no idea though..... "

Definately not "A-game" communication.....
 

butt

New Member
Bill Lear tried to get around the 12,500 lb. rule by limiting the Lear 23 to 12,499, but the FAA said no way.
It wouldn't matter because lears still have jet engines...

isn't one of the King Air's like this? 12,499 max gross weight to avoid the type rating?
 

Polar742

All the responsibility none of the authority
It wouldn't matter because lears still have jet engines...

isn't one of the King Air's like this? 12,499 max gross weight to avoid the type rating?
I think (memory from years and years) the KA 200 is paper-limited. I've seen a BE-200 type before too....
 

gne in prog

Well-Known Member
from king air school many years ago, the military variant of the king air 200 has a max of 14500, where as the civilian variant is a max of 12500, no type.
 

Polar742

All the responsibility none of the authority
It's my understanding that if one recieves a BE-200 type and the owned airplane has a STC, then the C12 weights can be used.

Is this true?
 

mjg407

Well-Known Member
It's my understanding that if one recieves a BE-200 type and the owned airplane has a STC, then the C12 weights can be used.

Is this true?
THe C-12 normal weights are 12,500 and below, however, with approval you can go up to 13,500. Which when you go to the FSDO for your type rating, is always a pain in the ***, because every FSDO isn't the same.... imagine that.
 
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