Multi-engine sea rating schools/training

JaceTheAce'sDad

Flying the Duchess.
Hello everyone,
I'm interested in flying (for a living) especially if it involves float planes (at least for a while) with icing on the cake being in a tropical locale. People have told me that you have to fly floats in a cold place before a warm place. That's OK. Does anyone know where I could get good training towards the sea ratings. A multi-engine is required for first officers at this outfit http://www.seaborneairlines.com/ as an example. I would likely get them on my ATP and CFI certificates. I'm wondering where the first officer applicants at Sea Borne get their multi-engine sea rating. Does anyone know.
Thanks,
Tim
 

caliginousface

Frank N. Beans
Norcal Aviation/Sierra Seaplanes up here at Pine Mountain Lake.
http://www.norcalaviation.com/

The website doesn't list the Aztec on floats or whatever, but they have it. Last I talked with them they can do the add-on in about $3000, and you would be able to stay on the couch of the office at night or something like that.
 

Wolfy

Well-Known Member
Norcal Aviation/Sierra Seaplanes up here at Pine Mountain Lake.
http://www.norcalaviation.com/

The website doesn't list the Aztec on floats or whatever, but they have it. Last I talked with them they can do the add-on in about $3000, and you would be able to stay on the couch of the office at night or something like that.
I've done a few checkrides with Terry, who may still be the owner. She's a great pilot, instructor and person. I know that Aztec on floats is expensive, around $500, most of which goes to insurance. She said if you're going to do it to already be rock solid on your multi engine stuff. It's not worth wasting a second in that airplane.
 

Adler

Low-Level Individual
Anybody know anything about a guy Richard Johnson that supposedly does multi's in an Air Cam down in Florida? I'm really interested.
 

Sheblerep

New Member
We offer a multi engine seaplane course in addition to the ATP and CFI courses. I do not know who handles the training for that company.

Give me a call if you would like some details.
 

KLB

Well-Known Member
Do they like it? Looks like a cool gig
They love it from what I can tell. One of the guys is real big into sail boating also. It's truly paradise for him! I havent gotten around to asking them how it is politically/socially over there with it being a muslim country and all. But since they're foreigners, I don't think they are held to the same rules and policies about things such as drinking alcoholic beverages, smoking, and such.
 

butt

New Member
I've always wanted to get into seaplane flying, but it seems that every time I come across a seaplane job, they have ridiculous hiring requirements. Theres this one place in the Philippines that fly charters between the different islands on Caravans on floats. Not only do they want you to have caravan experience and float experience, they want you to have like 300 hours in a caravan with floats. The same goes for Seaborne. Lots of twin otter time as well as lots of seaplane time isn't enough, they want you to have twin otter ON FLOATS time. Maybe with the industry picks up, some of these requirements will come down...
 

splash

your social justice comic center
Hello everyone,
I'm interested in flying (for a living) especially if it involves float planes (at least for a while) with icing on the cake being in a tropical locale. People have told me that you have to fly floats in a cold place before a warm place. That's OK. Does anyone know where I could get good training towards the sea ratings. A multi-engine is required for first officers at this outfit http://www.seaborneairlines.com/ as an example. I would likely get them on my ATP and CFI certificates. I'm wondering where the first officer applicants at Sea Borne get their multi-engine sea rating. Does anyone know.
Thanks,
Tim
We have the same dream. The seaplane pilots association website has loads of information. Whatever you need to know about floats, it is in there. Search the forum for answers to any of your questions. You may even find some info about seaborne. Good luck getting on over there.

I have somewhat gone the Alaska route to get into flying floats over there but many of the float operations there want many hours of Alaska time as well (correct me if I am wrong, pgram).

I have most of the popular float training books and the best one I have read is Notes of a Seaplane Instructor by Burke Mees (asa). I strongly suggest this one over any other that is out there.
 

Adler

Low-Level Individual
...The same goes for Seaborne. Lots of twin otter time as well as lots of seaplane time isn't enough, they want you to have twin otter ON FLOATS time...
From Seaborne's website:

  • Minimum of 2500 hours total pilot time in fixed wing aircraft, at least 1000 hours multi-engine time with 500 hours multi-engine and sea time.
  • Must have held previous Captain duties and responsibilities
  • Must provide at least three letters of reference from previous seaplane operators attesting to your skills
 

splash

your social justice comic center
I've always wanted to get into seaplane flying, but it seems that every time I come across a seaplane job, they have ridiculous hiring requirements. Maybe with the industry picks up, some of these requirements will come down...
They have been this way for years. I don't see the requirements changing with the rest of industry when it does.
 

JaceTheAce'sDad

Flying the Duchess.
Thanks to everyone for all the helpful posts. This helps narrow down my search although, I'm still wondering where most Seaborne first officers get their ratings. As shown below the minimums for first officers does not sound too daunting:
First Officer Qualifications


  1. Commercial Pilot Certificate with
    1. Multi-engine SEAPLANE Rating Instrument Rating
  2. First or Second Class Medical Certificate (Current)
  3. FCC Restricted Radio Operators Permit
  4. Valid U.S. Passport or a passport issued by a country of citizenship and proof of eligibility to work in the United States
  5. Must be able to pass all required PRIA and background screenings
  6. Must be willing to relocate to one of Seaborne Airlines crew domiciles
  7. Must be willing to commit to no less than 24 months of service
  8. Must be willing to work hard and smile!
  9. Must be willing to have fun in the Sunny Caribbean!
  10. Must be willing to wear shorts and sneakers as a uniform, ties are not allowed and ball caps are optional
First Officer Operating Experience

  1. 1500 hours Total time in fixed wing aircraft of which 500 hours is Multi-engine time.
  2. 1500 hours total time may be waived pending seaplane operating experience
I'm personally about 300 hours short on the muti-engine time and lacking in the ME Sea rating. Those mins don't sound all that unreasonable for such an operation. I'll just have to keep adding the multi time and throw in the necessary rating along the way.
Thanks again,
Tim
 
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