Masters Degree

Flight81

OO BRO FO
How much does a masters degree play into getting hired by a Major? How much does it really set you apart from the rest? I'm just trying to figure out if it's really worth the money to get one. THanks for the insight.
 

bike21

9-5 Ruins Lives
Probably not very much from what I have learned. Probably depends who is on the other side of the table. That said, if I was interviewing you I would certainly take into consideration that you have an advanced degree. But it also would depend if you did anything with that degree, or just got it to 'look good'.
 

skydog

New Member
How much does a masters degree play into getting hired by a Major? How much does it really set you apart from the rest? I'm just trying to figure out if it's really worth the money to get one. THanks for the insight.
Education, when viewed as an end in itself, and not as a means to an end, is always money well spent. However if you're simply looking to check off another box on the application, there are better and cheapers ways to accomplish that.
 

MQAAord

Scheherazade
Staff member
Education is always a good thing, but it won't help all that much in getting on with a major/legacy. Not that it won't be a plus for you, of course it would, but it's not something that you won't get hired without.

A master's is a great thing to have, and I think education and learning is a wonderful thing. But like Skydog said, if you'd just be doing it for the sole reason of putting it on a airline resume, don't bother. Do it because it's something you want to do for yourself or for a different job opportunity.
 

Flight81

OO BRO FO
Thank you gentlemen. It would more or less be a resume builder, however I do want to be an IP some day wherever I end up. So I was gonna go for a masters in some type of educational field to help be better prepared to teach.

I guess I should have took the opportunity to do it while I was in the Air Force, but between all the other schools I had to go to, I just didn't get around to it.
 

Silverhawkpmm

Well-Known Member
I put a good 8yrs in the corporate world after graduating from my undergrad degree before realizing flying was what I really wanted to do.

I went back and got my Master's in Business Ed - got a job at a local University.. started working / teaching for the school.

I think it's been one of the best moves in terms of being able to fly as much as I want with so many days off during the year and very flexible schedules.

Salaries across the board I think are a little lower but it looks great on the resume...plus if you want something bad enough it's worth working for !!

Best of Luck
 

higney85

Property of Scheduling
You can always add things to the resume without the degree. Things that come to mind are volunteer positions on various committees (prof standards, safety, training, etc) or pursue additional ratings (such as the dispatcher cert and the instructor ratings if you don't already have them). I am in the same boat of wanting the masters degree but the small steps of "cheaper" additions are more realistic at this point.
 

JoelT

Well-Known Member
Don't get a Masters in Education thinking it will help with being a check airman, sim instructor, or LCA (not called IPs in the airline world). The airlines will teach you how to teach THEIR way.

Also, in my new-hire class at my legacy very few if any had a masters. The few that I know with masters got it in the military just because it was free.

If you are currently flying at an airline, 135, or military I suggest joining the training department. That is MUCH better resume material than a masters. Safety, Pro Stands, HUPER, and CIRP committees are also great resume fodder.
 

Hacker15e

Dunning–Kruger Observer
Since people still debate the value of simply having a Bachelors degree when getting hired at a Major, I have to think that the same question when applied to a postgraduate degree has a similar answer.
 

Seggy

Well-Known Member
For what it is worth, I know a guy who talked a lot about his Masters Degree in Aeronautical Engineering during his interview at Emirates.

He thought they wanted to hear a lot about it.
 

Stratopilot

Well-Known Member
I'm currently working on my masters through Embry-Riddle's online program. The thing about a masters degree is that the only person you should be doing it for is yourself. Jobs come and go, as do careers, having a masters degree only makes you more marketable as a professional. Never look at tomorrow through todays lens. You may not be flying 10 years from now, and that masters degree will come in handy. The airlines may not care, and its thier loss quite frankly, but the rest of the world does.


Andy Poulton
Independent Flight Instructor
www.learntoflydallas.com
 

JoelT

Well-Known Member
Since people still debate the value of simply having a Bachelors degree when getting hired at a Major, I have to think that the same question when applied to a postgraduate degree has a similar answer.
Actually, the value of a bachelors is defined. Many airlines still require it. No airline requires a masters.

Now, if someone wants to get a post-grad degree or even another bachelors for themselves have at it. Looking back at my college days (crammed a four-year degree into five years :buck:) I wish I could have extended my stay at Auburn. An MBA would have been nice, then maybe a degree in Architecture. Even a PhD in Underwater Basket Weaving. Anything to be a "Professional Student". :D
 

captainphil

Well-Known Member
I'm glad this popped up. I just finished my first year at dowling college and i'm going for my bachelors in Professional Pilot, however it's a pricey school and I didn't do well in pre-calculus,so im thinking about changing my major to mainttain a good GPA. I have had alot of struggles with math and I don't care what I take as long as it stays far away from math. Is it worth it at this point?
 

JoelT

Well-Known Member
I'm glad this popped up. I just finished my first year at dowling college and i'm going for my bachelors in Professional Pilot, however it's a pricey school and I didn't do well in pre-calculus,so im thinking about changing my major to mainttain a good GPA. I have had alot of struggles with math and I don't care what I take as long as it stays far away from math. Is it worth it at this point?
I was kinda like you. I started out in engineering and made it through Calculus 3 but, struggling all the way. When I decided to be a pilot I switched to finance. Yeah, there is math involved but, nothing harder than basic algebra. So, I suggest you look into business.
 

NJT916

Well-Known Member
Personally, I think having both the BS and MS had something to do with me getting hired with such low time when compared to other new hires. Granted, both were in Hotel Administration, but I think it showed them that I had the capacity to learn and perform.

Plus, a degree is a security blanket if you decide you don't want to fly planes anymore.

Just my two cents...

Nick
 
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