King Air 350 Crash at Addison

WacoFan

Bigly
It was awful on him, I had no idea how bad pneumonia got until I watched him deal with it. Good thing is now that they have figured out his immune deficiency and they are managing that with infusions and they are giving him allergy shots that actually work.

As for your grandpa it sounds like our families are distantly intertwined. My dad flew for the original Midway Airlines and they operated the TWA DC-9-10s that your grandfather flew. As for me, my first job in aviation was as a ramper for Executive Beechcraft at MKC. Hangar 1 there was TWA’s back in the day and we would get into the condemned part of the building where their flight operations offices were. One of my good friends dad was a pilot for TWA and was hired in that hangar in 1966.

Lots of history at that old airport.
My Grandpa as part of his gig running the training center hired the pilots in the early 60's. I think he was done with that by 66 though and doing things with the DC-9. I think the last non-line flying thing before he went to Saudi Arabia was to be TWA's guy with the investigation of the DC-9 mid-air with the Baron in Urbana, OH in 1967. I remember - and it's one of my earliest memories - taking Grandpa to Municipal for what was his last flight from that airport. Grandma drove him to drop him off because when he came home from that trip he'd land at MCI.
 
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deadstick

Well-Known Member
My Grandpa as part of his gig running the training center hired the pilots in the early 60's. I think he was done with that by 66 though and doing things with the DC-9. I think the last non-line flying thing before he went to Saudi Arabia was to be TWA's guy with the investigation of the DC-9 mid-air with the Baron in Urbana, OH in 1967. I remember - and it's one of my earliest memories - taking Grandpa to Municipal for what was his last flight from that airport. Grandma drove him to drop him off because when he came home from that trip he'd land at MCI.
If you have any of your Grandpa’s old photos from around Hangar 1, that would be something.
 

TWP

Well-Known Member
I get the sleep schedule thing, but I never understand when people say stress. That is the most stress free job imaginable. There aren’t many gigs nowadays where you get to set the brake and completely forget about work for days at a time. Most jobs in today’s world have you tethered to phone and email around the clock.
You know everyone says this, but then I look at most pilots in the terminal and the signs are clear. Just because you don’t realize you’re stressed doesn’t mean you’re not. But then again, everyone is different.
 

BEEF SUPREME

Well-Known Member
I get the sleep schedule thing, but I never understand when people say stress. That is the most stress free job imaginable. There aren’t many gigs nowadays where you get to set the brake and completely forget about work for days at a time. Most jobs in today’s world have you tethered to phone and email around the clock.
Do you even corporate bro? During my first walk around at SKYW I realized 12 other people were doing all the stuff I used to do as a Falcon 900 captain. I’m dumb so I actually had to see it happening in real life. I swear I felt my stress level go from like a 10 to a 1 as I witnessed each person doing the many things I did on my own for the Falcon operation.


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CFI A&P

Exploring the world one toilet at a time.
and that’s why some 121 folks can’t get hired in the 91/135 realm.
Retired 121 guy sitting in class at their new 135 "retirement gig that'll pay for my Corvette": So who is the dispatcher here?

135 Indoc instructor: You saw them in the mirror when you were shaving this morning.

Retired 121 guy: Who files our flight plans?

135 Indoc instructor: The dispatcher. FltPlan dot com, the password is PapersiceCOFFEE135!

Retired 121 guy:
1600656658632.png
 

Richman

That's "Lord Garth" to you
Retired 121 guy sitting in class at their new 135 "retirement gig that'll pay for my Corvette": So who is the dispatcher here?

135 Indoc instructor: You saw them in the mirror when you were shaving this morning.

Retired 121 guy: Who files our flight plans?

135 Indoc instructor: The dispatcher. FltPlan dot com, the password is PapersiceCOFFEE135!

Retired 121 guy:
View attachment 55585
That's just poor SA.
 

BEEF SUPREME

Well-Known Member
That's just poor SA.
I mostly hated working with most airline background pilots because they didn’t understand the job. Some did really well. Certainly a risky hire.

You couldn’t pay me enough to go back to it. When I was sure of furlough I lined up a job coaching mountain biking and another job working at a bike shop.


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averettpilot

Well-Known Member
It also seems like total BS.

My one and only corporate gig was working with two former airline pilots. Not sure why so many part 91 guys like to pretend it’s super hard to use Fltplan.com and get Coffee/Ice/Papers.
It’s not hard. It’s just more things on your to do list. When the flying part of the job starts getting difficult, all that other stuff just adds to the stress. Some can handle it, some can’t.
 

gotWXdagain

Polished Member
I’m in medevac but I echo what has been said. Retired 121 captains seem to have about the highest likelihood of failing our sim eval, and those that do come through the door have the hardest time with the transition.

“You know all those little rural airstrips you flew over in the fancy jet and wondered what it would be like to land there? Guess what, you’re about to find out. It will be at 2am, in wintertime, with a nonexistent temp dewpoint spread. Good luck!”
 

Boris Badenov

Just running in to a burning house...
I kind of miss being responsible for everything. When your head is on the block, you also have the power to see to it that everything gets done. Now when things go pear shaped on the ground I'm just along for the ride, and we are going to fail passive to the speed of the dumbest link in the chain.

However I'm also still getting paid, and have work rules that are actually observed and a union. I said *kind of*!
 

deadstick

Well-Known Member
I’m not saying that it’s right or wrong. It’s just what I’ve seen. Some operators want to hire somebody who can get plugged in ASAP. I can give you first-hand examples that support both sides, too. I worked with some airline types in EMS. We worked 7/7s for an operation that was 98% helicopters. We didn’t have pool pilots, but we had a pride thing going that we were never out of service for pilots. Well, these guys would never work OT. When they were off hitch, you might as well lose their number. There was another who inisited we should never start the climb checklist until 10,000 ft because that’s what he did in the E175. We were in a KA. 95% of our legs were below 14,000 and less than 40 min. But he was always right. I take back what I said earlier. My first hand accounts are like that. After I left, they hired one who from what I hear is pretty squared away.
 

Itchy

Well-Known Member
I’m in medevac but I echo what has been said. Retired 121 captains seem to have about the highest likelihood of failing our sim eval, and those that do come through the door have the hardest time with the transition.

“You know all those little rural airstrips you flew over in the fancy jet and wondered what it would be like to land there? Guess what, you’re about to find out. It will be at 2am, in wintertime, with a nonexistent temp dewpoint spread. Good luck!”
Hate to pile on, but so true. Used to be a check airman at a medium sized 135 freight gig. Some of the hardest to train were ex 121 folks, and a few either didn’t make it, or bowed out early. “You’re actually going to depart in this weather??”
 
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