JET LAG

jetman

New Member
How do aircrews deal with jetlag? i mean BIG time zones changes like flying from N America to the Far East or Australia and then back in a few days,how about having to go to sleep when the body is ready for accion and going to work when is time to sleep?
 

MrSkyKingRon

New Member
Set their watch back 8 hours?
Good question. Probably just try to "catch up" when they can. Although, I have a DVD on sleep deprivation, and they say you can never "catch up". Once you've lost that sleep it's gone. Your body is tired and you need rest, but you never get that sleep back.
 

I_Money

Moderator
I think it is something you learn to minimize. I have flown my fair share of long haul, and I generally do well from the first night sleep. Maybe wake up once, but always go back to sleep shortly afterwards.
 

av8rmsu

Well-Known Member
My friend's dad is a 747-400 captain for NW. Last time I talked to him, he had flown three roundtrips between Minneapolis and Tokyo in about an 8 or 9 day time period. He says he just sleeps when he is supposed to sleep and is awake when is supposed to be awake. When he gets home, he works out to keep himself awake during the day. It takes him about 3 days to get back to normal.

He is about to turn 59 and is sick and tired (no pun intended) of the long hauls. His body is just taking a serious toll.
 

JDMcFly

New Member
"He is about to turn 59 and is sick and tired (no pun intended) of the long hauls. His body is just taking a serious toll."

It does take it's toll..

I've been told a lot of senior pilots who bid up to International F/O, soon bid back down to national Capt.
 

seagull

Well-Known Member
It depends a lot on the trip, but the NWA capt is pretty much right on. Sleep when you're tired, exercise, and that's about all you can do.

Our trips vary from 2 day trips out to Europe to 14 day trips that go all over the world. Recovering from bouncing around Asia for a week can be a lot harder than multiple crossings. I did 6 Atlantic and 2 Pacific crossings in one month last year, and that was tiring, but the recovery wasn't bad. Similar with around the world flights, where you're never in one place long enough to settle into a time zone, so recovery is fast when you get home.
 

ERAU_Intern

New Member
Seagull, youre making me jealous. What a career youve got there! Question for you though. I really am trying to gear my career toward air freight. What is the job outlook for FedEX in the future do you think?
 

FalconCapt

New Member
I found that if the schedule allows, to stay on your home time zone. Yes in Asia this means being awake on the back side of the clock, but it dramatically shortens my recovery time when I get home.

Europe isn't too bad as that is usually only 6 to 7 hour time difference, typically there I'll stay up late, have breakfast at about 6am (local time) and then head to bed. Of course, this all depends on the flying schedule... Our passengers realize they aren't doing us any favors by staying an extra night so we can leave at 7am the next morning from Europe to come home... We are better off leaving at 8pm the night before (which would be about noon "body time")...
 

seagull

Well-Known Member
Long term, I think FedEx will continue to do a lot of hiring. Just was a little hiring this year, but I am guessing we'll do a bit more in 2004.
 

Maximilian_Jenius

Super User
[ QUOTE ]
My friend's dad is a 747-400 captain for NW. Last time I talked to him, he had flown three roundtrips between Minneapolis and Tokyo in about an 8 or 9 day time period. He says he just sleeps when he is supposed to sleep and is awake when is supposed to be awake. When he gets home, he works out to keep himself awake during the day. It takes him about 3 days to get back to normal.

He is about to turn 59 and is sick and tired (no pun intended) of the long hauls. His body is just taking a serious toll.

[/ QUOTE ]



Exactly why I want to be a domestic captain flying 757,767,777,7E7's verses flying international.

However if I did ever fly international would only want to do European transatlantic flights cause there not far from the states and at most are like 5-6 hours ahead of us.

Asia international flights you all can have that it's all yours...



Matthew

Superior Valkyrie ace
 

av8rmsu

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
My friend's dad is a 747-400 captain for NW. Last time I talked to him, he had flown three roundtrips between Minneapolis and Tokyo in about an 8 or 9 day time period. He says he just sleeps when he is supposed to sleep and is awake when is supposed to be awake. When he gets home, he works out to keep himself awake during the day. It takes him about 3 days to get back to normal.

He is about to turn 59 and is sick and tired (no pun intended) of the long hauls. His body is just taking a serious toll.

[/ QUOTE ]



Exactly why I want to be a domestic captain flying 757,767,777,7E7's verses flying international.

However if I did ever fly international would only want to do European transatlantic flights cause there not far from the states and at most are like 5-6 hours ahead of us.

Asia international flights you all can have that it's all yours...



Matthew

Superior Valkyrie ace



[/ QUOTE ]



5-6 hours ahead are some....yes

but don't forget about some of the longer flights to places such as Italy and Greece. 10 hours to Zurich from O'hare is what my mother told me a few weeks ago. Besides that, coming back is usually an hour or so longer.

I do agree, Atlantic routes would be easier. I've been to Europe and lived in China for a summer. The Europe transition was much easier, but it is still a pain. Besides, look at some one like Doug who lives in the mountain time zone. That six hour England difference from the East Coast is 8 or 9 hours from the West Coast.
 

seagull

Well-Known Member
If you think that all domestic flying is easy, you're wrong. Most pilots find that the international can be easier, with longer layovers in more interesting cities. A week of domestic flying usually involves either some real early mornings or late (or all) nighters, with short layover. It's just a week out of your life, with nothing but work, sleeping, eating and maybe a work out. International you can get out and really see some sights, etc., so more interesting. Also, international flying is a lot more interesting and challenging in itself.
 

Maximilian_Jenius

Super User
Your right...but I hope to fly for Delta or Continental. Though yes I fly for anyone who hired me (jus to stop a flame war from happen).

And they don't fly to Australia or China or Africa not sure if they even fly to Japan but think they do.


Matthew
 

av8rmsu

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
If you think that all domestic flying is easy, you're wrong. Most pilots find that the international can be easier, with longer layovers in more interesting cities. A week of domestic flying usually involves either some real early mornings or late (or all) nighters, with short layover. It's just a week out of your life, with nothing but work, sleeping, eating and maybe a work out. International you can get out and really see some sights, etc., so more interesting. Also, international flying is a lot more interesting and challenging in itself.

[/ QUOTE ]


very good point!
 

Derg

New Arizona, Il Duce/Warlord
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]
How do aircrews deal with jetlag? i mean BIG time zones changes like flying from N America to the Far East or Australia and then back in a few days,how about having to go to sleep when the body is ready for accion and going to work when is time to sleep?


[/ QUOTE ]

Extraordinarily bad. My body clock is completely broken and pretty much I eat according to my watch. Like right now it's 12:07am and unless I had a watch on, I'd have no idea what time it was. If I set my watch to 11:30am, I'd probably start craving lunch. Also, I have a horrible insomnia problem so I usually have to force myself to go to sleep on an average day.

You kind of learn to negotiate with your body.
 

I_Money

Moderator
I do not think you can say the EU, is easier to go to vs. Asia, what I find really makes the different is the time of day you leave, and arrive at. If you leave at 6:00 in the morning have a snooze on the flight, and arrive mid afternoon, have a shower, a rest, a meal then an early night, it is much better then leaving at 21:00 for a 12 hour flight, arriving in the morning, nackered, just wanting a whisky a meal and a sleep.
 

IrishSheepdog

Sitting in the median
I'm with Doug on this one. Even though I only fly regional domestic across two time zones, ever since I started this job, my body clock is all kinds of messed up. I'll get coffee and a breakfast crossant at 11:30am sometimes, or be craving eggs and sausage at 2:00pm when I roll out of bed. It's so much worse when doing standups, where I'll drive to the airport at 8:00pm, fly a leg, overnight for four hours, then fly back at 5:00am eastern time having woken up at 3:30am eastern (2:30 home) to get in and go to bed again at 6:30am, only to wake up around 3:00pm to start it again. This goes on for like four days. Now, after having a week off and staying up until 2:00am and getting up at 10:00am, it's 2:45am and I am supposed to wake up at 6:00am to go to work for a 3-day but I woke up and was craving food after about 5 hours in bed. Tomorrow I'll be in the hotel after 3 legs at around 3:00pm eastern, and have to be at the airport for a 5:30am eastern departure. If it wasn't for everyone on the radio saying "whoo hooo it's Friday, the work week is over!" I wouldn't have a clue what day it is. But honestly, I like it this way...
 

Derg

New Arizona, Il Duce/Warlord
Staff member
Yup, we live in a different world.

I hate lines (queues for Iain!), and by virtue of me being off during the week and usually working on the weekends, I never have to deal with them.

So if I go out for a croissant and a cup of coffee, I'm able to get in, grab some prime real estate and spread my Arizona Republic out on the table without much of a hassle. However, when I'm off on the weekends, I'm amazed just how crowded everything is. Like today, Kristie took the day off so we could mail the rest of the shipment to Iraq (hard work man!) and we went to Costco. It wasn't so bad, but I bet you if we go this afternoon (Saturday), there'd be a billion people -- primarily because everyone's off.

I rarely have to deal with traffic, have lunch at weird times but the tradeoff is that my wristwatch more or less determines where my body clock is (or is not).

The worst part is when I have an early morning east coast "pushback" at like 5:45 am, and have a quick "breckie" in flight. We might arrive a few time zones west, and it's still breakfast time. Since it's not time for lunch (from my departure city), my body gets hungry but since my watch says "morning!" I re-crave breakfast. Then we might switch jets and fly onto the west coast where in the timezone of which I woke up in, it's time for dinner and a frosted malted adult beverage, but the wristwatch says it's time for a jog and a light lunch.

Gotta love it!
 
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