How do you get Mo Gas into your airplane?

WAFlyBoy

Well-Known Member
This question might seem a bit amateur to you mo-gas burners:

(Assume a C-152 or 172) How do you fill up your airplane tanks? Do some airports sell it at the airplane pumps? What if you need to fuel up at an airport without it? Do you take the courtesy car down to Chevron with a couple of 5-gallon containers?

I'm thinking about getting back into general aviation (well, more daydreaming really) and burning car gas seems like a good way to go for a number of reasons. What are some of the disadvantages?
 

dc3flyer

Well-Known Member
Well, assuming you have an approved STC installed on your plane....

Many small GA airports have mogas on the field. There are a few websites you can look at in your planning to see if it is available. I have also done the 5 gallon jug thing as well. I also know a couple of people that have large tanks in the back of their trucks. Of course these guys have more money than me, but it is an option. Their tanks have pumps and everything, right in the back of your vehicle.

Another thing to think about it that most STC's for mogas require you to run a mixture, or at least some 100LL per a certain number of hours. A good way to work that in, is when you fly to another airport (one that doesn't sell mogas) fill up with 100LL.
 

matt152

Well-Known Member
(Assume a C-152 or 172) How do you fill up your airplane tanks? Do some airports sell it at the airplane pumps? What if you need to fuel up at an airport without it? Do you take the courtesy car down to Chevron with a couple of 5-gallon containers?

I'm thinking about getting back into general aviation (well, more daydreaming really) and burning car gas seems like a good way to go for a number of reasons. What are some of the disadvantages?
There are a few airports that sell mogas alongside 100LL. I use airnav:

http://www.airnav.com/fuel/local.html

I think the increased cost of 100LL outweighs the hassle of carting around 5 gallon containers of mogas.

Also, generally for a 152 you are going to need premium mogas unless you have done a piston change. Also, at least where I am from, it is impossible to find mogas without ethanol which is required by the STCs.
 

WAFlyBoy

Well-Known Member
Ok, thanks for the replies.

Does a 152 engine run just as well using car gasoline? Any problems with preignition?
 

WAFlyBoy

Well-Known Member
So does the STC require some use of 100LL because the lead in the fuel prevents excessive wear to the valve seats?
 

HeyEng

NAHB Doesn't Give a Crap
So does the STC require some use of 100LL because the lead in the fuel prevents excessive wear to the valve seats?
I have the STC on my Cherokee and I don't remember that being in there. After doing some research, I came to the conclusion that it wasn't worth the hassle...vapor lock, no lead issues, finding fuel without alcohol, and on and on. There is quite a bit of good info out there if you google it. I will dig out my STC and review it for the 100LL restriction.
 

DE727UPS

Well-Known Member
"Many small GA airports have mogas on the field."

Name one? Nothing personal, but to say "many" isn't too accurate. I know of one between WA and CA. Airnav is a great resource, though. Maybe we can start a thread on where to get mogas at airports. Pullman, WA. KPUW.

To answer the guys question. I've done it many ways. I started with a 100gal tank in the back of a pickup. Got kicked off of Boeing Field in Seattle for it. 5 gal cans were okay. Moved to Renton, got kicked off that airport, too. FBO's selling fuel do all they can to put pressure on you to buy their gas.

Moved to the more sensible half of WA state. Had a tank in the back of an ugly pickup truck in Coeur D Alene. It was a derelict, but when the Vice Prez came to town, the CIA told the airport to get rid of it as a security risk (I'm not kidding). Truck was impounded and I had to donate it to the county.

Moved to Deer Park and bought a hangar. Have used a 55 gal drum with a 12 volt pump. With a 152 or smaller, you could do 5 gal cans. Anything bigger and it's just a heck of a lot of work.

152's are approved for 91 octane auto gas. It's true that you need to find fuel without alcohol, not always easy. There is a simple test you can do to see if there is alcohol in your gas.

I've burned autogas in 150's, 152's, 172's, and a Piper Apache. No problems.

Check these sites out:

http://www.autofuelstc.com/
http://www.aviationfuel.org/autogas/stc.asp
 

WAFlyBoy

Well-Known Member
What a hassle!

Thanks for the info. I've been to lots of airports (including one in the Ozarks that I think sold me mogas with blue food coloring in it and called it 100LL) but cannot recall seeing mogas being advertised anywhere.

Much appreciated.
 

MikeOH58

Well-Known Member
Bummer...Can do for cheetahs and travelers but not the AA5B Tiger...

Got my hopes up for a minute =(
 

mhcasey

Well-Known Member
Most small carburated normally aspirated engines were designed for 80/87 octane Avgas.

100LL is actually overkill in your C-172.
Why is the STC only for 91 octane?

Also, does octane rating decrease with altitude? Maybe I've made a poor inference, but it seemed the last time I was in Colorado/Wyoming the octane at the pump was 2 less than in TX?
 

USMCmech

Well-Known Member
Octane numbers for Mogas are measured differently than the octane ratings for avgas.

Regular unleaded is not the same thing as 80/87 avgas. I forget all the details, but you need to follow the instructions laid out in the STC.
 

matt152

Well-Known Member
Why is the STC only for 91 octane?

Also, does octane rating decrease with altitude? Maybe I've made a poor inference, but it seemed the last time I was in Colorado/Wyoming the octane at the pump was 2 less than in TX?
The Lycoming O-235 used in the C-152 is a higher compression engine than the Continental used in the C-150. I guess when Petersen did their testing, they needed the extra octane to give a high enough margin from detonation.

As to the lower octane in the Western states, I believe it is because engines at that altitude are producing less power. So they do not need as much antiknock margin.

Most of the regular mogas in CT and MA is 87. Occasionally you will see someone selling 86 for cheap.
 

matt152

Well-Known Member
"Many small GA airports have mogas on the field."

Name one? Nothing personal, but to say "many" isn't too accurate.
I would not say many, but there are a few out there. 7B6 (Skylark Airpark) in CT has nonethanol premium mogas on the field. But the price is $5.50 a gallon. Doesn't make much sense when you fly 5 minutes north and get 100LL for $4.99 at BAF.

Airnav will let you check for fields with mogas in your neck of the woods.
 

HeyEng

NAHB Doesn't Give a Crap
I would not say many, but there are a few out there. 7B6 (Skylark Airpark) in CT has nonethanol premium mogas on the field. But the price is $5.50 a gallon. Doesn't make much sense when you fly 5 minutes north and get 100LL for $4.99 at BAF.

Airnav will let you check for fields with mogas in your neck of the woods.
Kinda sounds like taking my truck 30 miles to fill up on E85 that costs 30 cents less yet gets worse mileage. Just doesn't make much sense. I like Don's idea though....hmmmm, need to get me a hanger! :)
 

OldTownPilot

Well-Known Member
Nope, no 4-lane highways in Alaska;)

If he said I land on the dirt road, and taxi into town, then I'd go with the alaska theory.:D
 

Barty

Well-Known Member
Here's a pretty good article on mogas and avgas. I think it just reinforces the point that the industry is going to have to get its head out of its butt and come up with an alternative to super high octane leaded fuel. Though they're touting an electronic ignition at the end of the story, part of the problem is that the fuel and ignition technology used in aircraft, for a lack of a better word, is anchient.

It was probably illegal as hell, but the flying club I used to fly with had an old Nissan pickup truck that had about a 80 gallon tank, pump and filter bolted down in the back for mogas. Every couple of days someone from the club would go down to the local gas station and fill it up, they ran 3 150s and one of the 172s on it. We also had a Cherokee 140 and another 172N, but neither had the mogas STC.

I guess it helps if I include the link...

http://www.kitplanes.com/magazine/pdfs/0606-2935.pdf
 
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