Have you heard? The bird is the word.

SpiraMirabilis

Possible Subversive
Got these pics emailed to me and thought I would share. One of our Dash-8's had a birdstrike on final into an outstation. Apparently struck the rightside inboard flap so hard as to cause the damage you see in the second photo, which is the next day when they took out the bird. I don't know what kind of bird it was but reports indicate that it was at least as big as "Texas."

Speed tape, sign the can, good to go or at least that was my first thought but apparently the rumor is they had to fly a tech out from Bombardier (or at least our main maintenance HQ) to look at it, so the a/c is still sitting out there in the outstation. I wonder if they buried the bird.
 

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Jason

Well-Known Member
That's nuthin'.... back around 1999-ish, we had a Dash at Allegheny take a bird strike on the leading edge in the Philly area (I believe the flight was PHL to ABE) - it was a large bird (I think a goose) and the aircraft was out of service for many months due to damage to the wing spar!!
 

coa787

Unknown Member
That's nuthin'.... back around 1999-ish, we had a Dash at Allegheny take a bird strike on the leading edge in the Philly area (I believe the flight was PHL to ABE) - it was a large bird (I think a goose) and the aircraft was out of service for many months due to damage to the wing spar!!
Maybe they were just too lazy to fix it?
 

JumpWake

Well-Known Member
/hijack

I really thought, from the title of the thread, it was going to be about something else...

[yt]O6I1xj6djn8[/yt]


/thread hijack.
 

Jason

Well-Known Member
Maybe they were just too lazy to fix it?
I'm sure they didn't have as many guys on it as they could have but they did have to tear down the wing to get enough access to repair the wing spar and then put it back together. It was many, many hundreds of man hours by the time it was airworthy again.
 

coa787

Unknown Member
I'm sure they didn't have as many guys on it as they could have but they did have to tear down the wing to get enough access to repair the wing spar and then put it back together. It was many, many hundreds of man hours by the time it was airworthy again.
Ahh, okay.
 
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