g1000 transition?

fisher37

Well-Known Member
hello all. I'm at the point in my training where I'm able to transition into a glass cockpit, any suggestions? I'm currently doing instrument training. I've flown the g1000 once and loved it, but how hard is it to transition back to the steam gauge cockpit once you've learned everything in a g1000? i'll be flying a bonanza as soon as i get done with all my instrument training.

Thanks.
 

USMC-SSGT

Well-Known Member
Fool proof to go back and forth providing it is at regular intervals. If you fly the G1000 for hundreds of hours over the course of a year or so it will be a short transition of maybe one flight at the most when you finally work back into steam gauges. When I instructed I went back and forth daily and never noticed a difference.
 

esa17

Well-Known Member
The steam to glass transition is quite easy if you're already schooled on steam PRIOR to the transition. Taking someone who only knows the G1000 and placing them in a steam gauge aircraft is not pretty. Quite honestly, now that I have a few hundred hours of G1000 time I'd say its for the birds, give me steam any day.
 

fisher37

Well-Known Member
thanks for the replies.. i did my private in steam gauges and probably around 15 hours of my instrument so far in them..i feel i understand it fairly well. I'm just thinking ahead for the future. I will probably fly both types just to make sure im still up to speed in the steam gauges.
 

TGatch

Well-Known Member
The steam to glass transition is quite easy if you're already schooled on steam PRIOR to the transition. Taking someone who only knows the G1000 and placing them in a steam gauge aircraft is not pretty. Quite honestly, now that I have a few hundred hours of G1000 time I'd say its for the birds, give me steam any day.

Amen to that, I've seen people who can't function without a GPS telling them everything. Pretty neat stuff though.
 

Shep8

New Member
from someone who did instrument in G1000 then was forced to go back to steam the transition felt like I learned instrument flying all over again. Wouldn't highly reccomend it.
 

DPApilot

GUYSH! GUYSH! GUYSH!
from someone who did instrument in G1000 then was forced to go back to steam the transition felt like I learned instrument flying all over again. Wouldn't highly reccomend it.

i have a sim you can have if you want?
pm me
 

fisher37

Well-Known Member
just an update..

I've flown the g1000 a couple times now, the only difference that i can see that would make a difference between g1000 and steam gauges are that the needles are automatically adjusted to an approach on the glass panel. as for anything else, its a cessna 172, the gauges are just in a different form, and you know exactly where you're at 100% of the time! any other differences that i should know about??
 

ILS37R

Well-Known Member
Partial Panel. That's a difference. Also, holds with and without the ability to use an autopilot. NDB approaches.

Like many, I learned steam and transitioned to glass some time later. Not a problem if you're reasonably tech-savvy and have experience with moving map GPS units (especially the 430).

The main thing I'd say is that--if you're working on your IR G1000, don't switch back to steam gauges until you're done. An important part of instrument proficiency is being able to react and program reasonably quickly in a busy flight environment, so it's key for everything to be where you expect it to be. If you aren't already familiar with using an autopilot from your PPL training, get comfortable with it now (your 172s have the K(r)AP 140, I presume?).

Once you've got your IR ticket, go up with an instructor a couple times in steam gauge planes and do a mock IPC before you go flying into clouds in an older plane.
 

fisher37

Well-Known Member
Partial Panel. That's a difference. Also, holds with and without the ability to use an autopilot. NDB approaches.

Like many, I learned steam and transitioned to glass some time later. Not a problem if you're reasonably tech-savvy and have experience with moving map GPS units (especially the 430).

The main thing I'd say is that--if you're working on your IR G1000, don't switch back to steam gauges until you're done. An important part of instrument proficiency is being able to react and program reasonably quickly in a busy flight environment, so it's key for everything to be where you expect it to be. If you aren't already familiar with using an autopilot from your PPL training, get comfortable with it now (your 172s have the K(r)AP 140, I presume?).

Once you've got your IR ticket, go up with an instructor a couple times in steam gauge planes and do a mock IPC before you go flying into clouds in an older plane.
unfortunetly as soon as our 172's came in from cessna i found out they didnt have autopilot, i guess the school really wanted us to learn how to fly for some reason:banghead:
 

TGatch

Well-Known Member
Besides getting checked out in a G1000 172 I have never flown with an auto pilot..I'd much rather steer with my rudder pedals while I fumble around with my charts/plates etc...at cruise of course:D
 

fisher37

Well-Known Member
haha yeah, i learned about that last night. i had it trimmed out just right that i was messing around with my plates, and never moved a degree or lost or gained altitude, it was perfect!
 

ILS37R

Well-Known Member
unfortunetly as soon as our 172's came in from cessna i found out they didnt have autopilot, i guess the school really wanted us to learn how to fly for some reason:banghead:
Probably just as well; they trim out fine. The reason I mentioned it, though, is that if an autopilot were in the plane, an examiner may well ask you to use it during the flight. A checkride is not a great time to be learning how to use the autopilot :p

As for NDB approaches... they are pure, undistilled love. You're really missing out, I'm tellin' ya'. Nothing like having ATC querying you for being way off course when you've got the needle pegged.
 

fisher37

Well-Known Member
hahaha yeah, im sure i'll fly the steam gauges again sometime just to make sure im up to date in them too, so maybe i'll get to do that!
 
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