First Eclipse accident

Sprint100

Well-Known Member
OK, now the nay-sayers can breathe out that "I told you so".

NTSB ISSUES PRELIMINARY REPORT ON FIRST ECLIPSE ACCIDENT
The pilot of the Eclipse 500 that ran off the runway at the Brandywine Airport in West Chester, Pa., told the NTSB he was fast and high on the approach to the relatively short, narrow runway. The accident, the first for the new model of the very light jet, caused substantial damage to the airplane, but the pilot and the only passenger, his young daughter, were not hurt. Read more about the accident on AOPA Online.
 

jtrain609

Uniting the black vote.
These should be the most two often said words of anybody in an airplane they're not comfortable with yet:

Go
Around
 

jtrain609

Uniting the black vote.
These should be the most two often said words of anybody in an airplane they're not comfortable with yet:

Go
Around
 

BobDDuck

Island Bus Driver
These should be the most two often said words of anybody on a keyboard they aren't comfortable with yet:

Double
Post




:)
 

Baronpilot244

Killick Stoker
Like any airplane. . .this won't be the last.
Indeed!
The insurance companies will bitch and raise the premiums, but pilots will still bend them. Look at the Cirrus SR22 - even with its wonderful chute and fixed gear, they're still falling out of the sky.......

I notice the NTSB hasn't released the pilot's qualifications or history - yet. His experience in type and in general will be the big issue.

BP244
 

ackeight

Well-Known Member
I believe I remember reading that he was an ATP. He's also flown in and out of that airport 60 previous times. He was qouted saying that he knew he was high and fast going into the airport (only 3700ft long w/ 250 ft displaced threshold b/c of trees). Sounds like it could be a Macho case. He probably has less than 100 in type. Just monday quarterbackin though.
 

vheissu

Well-Known Member
A few months ago there was an Eclipse stuck out at the airport with a blown tire.. The skid mark he left on the last 500 feet of the runway was pretty unbelievable. Came in hot and fast and floated down half the runway... Scary stuff
 

Murdoughnut

Well sized member
Indeed!
The insurance companies will bitch and raise the premiums, but pilots will still bend them. Look at the Cirrus SR22 - even with its wonderful chute and fixed gear, they're still falling out of the sky.......

I notice the NTSB hasn't released the pilot's qualifications or history - yet. His experience in type and in general will be the big issue.

BP244
That's because you don't need to be a pilot to fly an SR22 - just need to know how to operate a computer.
 

mikecweb

Well-Known Member
That's because you don't need to be a pilot to fly an SR22 - just need to know how to operate a computer.
And that is what people are led to believe and it's also the attitude that is going to get a lot of people killed. At the end of the day stick and rudder skills and good decision making skills make safe pilots, not the age of the plane or technology in their aircraft.
 

Boris Badenov

Just running in to a burning house...
I read somewhere that the eclipse stalls at 69 knots and weighs something like 5000lbs. What are they doing the Fred Flintstone to stop? Does it HAVE brakes?
 

WacoFan

Bigly
Look at the Cirrus SR22 - even with its wonderful chute and fixed gear, they're still falling out of the sky.......

I notice the NTSB hasn't released the pilot's qualifications or history - yet. His experience in type and in general will be the big issue.

BP244
First off, Jtrains double post was excellent - great advice.

Secondly a question: The Cirrus with the BRS chute still manages to be involved in many accidents. Cirrus promotes the chute heavily, Columbia/Cessna promotes an intense learning program including unusual attitude training. Does anyone have data regarding Cessna/Columbia 400 accidents vs. SR22? I mostly hear about SR22 wrecks. Ercoupe was supposedly the safest airplane ever built, but people have still managed to kill themselves with them. My question: Do you think Ercoupes, and now Cirrus' attract a clientele that is not as comfortable flying, or perhaps has degraded skills because of their safety features? Someone that wouldn't step up to a plane of that performance due to lack of confidence or skill telling themselves "hey, it has a BRS chute, if things go haywire I can always pull that"? Perhaps people scared themselves in Aeronca Champs and said "screw it, I can fly an Ercoupe - impossible to spin and no tricky rudders". Do you think these "safe" airplanes attract a least common denominator of pilot?
 

jynxyjoe

The Kickin' Chicken!
I know we've all got a lot of monday quarterback in us, however, it is important to note that after a lot of pre-certification tests it was brought up many times they needed a larger heavier tire or an anti-skid system (more weight). Eclipse last I heard, is now going back to review both ideas and I'd be willing to bet one or the other will end up on the plane within the next 6 months.
 

surreal1221

Well-Known Member
In one word.

Yes.

Cirrus attracts a clientele that has too much money, and not enough brains.

The VLJ crowd will do the same. Only a matter of time.
 

mikecweb

Well-Known Member
In one word.

Yes. Cirrus attracts a clientele that has too much money, and not enough brains.

The VLJ crowd will do the same. Only a matter of time.
Unfortunately it was 26 words, oh well maybe next time.


This experience requirements for these aircraft have as much to blame as the pilots themselves.
 

CK

Well-Known Member
I notice the NTSB hasn't released the pilot's qualifications or history - yet. His experience in type and in general will be the big issue.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with multiple ratings, including airplane multi-engine land, and type ratings for the Eclipse 500, Hawker Sidley 125 business jet airplane, and Learjet. He reported 6,300 total hours of flight experience on his most recent application for an FAA first-class medical certificate, dated July 2, 2008.
 

Murdoughnut

Well sized member
And that is what people are led to believe and it's also the attitude that is going to get a lot of people killed. At the end of the day stick and rudder skills and good decision making skills make safe pilots, not the age of the plane or technology in their aircraft.
I agree - 100%
 

CcrlR737AMT

Well-Known Member
A few months ago there was an Eclipse stuck out at the airport with a blown tire.. The skid mark he left on the last 500 feet of the runway was pretty unbelievable. Came in hot and fast and floated down half the runway... Scary stuff
They had another one here in this area when the thrust levers inadvertendly moved forward while one was attempting to land.
 
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