Family Member Learning to Fly

Kingairer

'Tiger Team' Member
My father wants to start flying....I dont know how to handle this. He wants to buy an airplane, train for licenses, and then use it on his weekly commute (4+hours) drive. I would like to teach him, but is that a conflict of interest? Like a Dr working on a family member? What kind of things are big points to look at when buying an airplane (Like a 1970's 172).
 

HOTDOG

New Member
My father wants to start flying....I dont know how to handle this. He wants to buy an airplane, train for licenses, and then use it on his weekly commute (4+hours) drive. I would like to teach him, but is that a conflict of interest? Like a Dr working on a family member? What kind of things are big points to look at when buying an airplane (Like a 1970's 172).
I don't see a problem with it...My CFI is teaching his son for his IR.
 

OnTheFly7

Well-Known Member
I do not think there is an issue with this at all. The only thing that may be required if you are doing it at a local FBO is that the Cheif Pilot may want to go up with him every couple of flights or so. I know when my father wanted to teach me this was the case. Just to make sure things are progressing as they should (ie: no sliding through because of who the student is).
 

MQAAord

Scheherazade
Staff member
There is no conflict of interest, is it perfectly acceptable to teach a family member if both parties are willing to it.

I know Bill would have probably liked to have taught me, however his CFI was years out of currency by that point, and working around his DL schedule would have been difficult. Also, I think *I* would have been very nervous with him teaching me. Not saying all married couples shouldn't being involved in training situations with each other, but I think I would have been a lot more anxious with him with me than I was with someone else. Also, after I got my PPL I had to go up with my dad to get "checked out" in his Archer. Going through that ride with him was 100 times more nervewracking than the actual PPL checkride was! :laff:

With both of those instances, the issue was with me, and that is not necessarily the case of how it would be with every family-teaching-family situation. If you both are comfortable with it, then go for it.
 

Nick

Well-Known Member
Two Fathers, Two Sons

My father wants to start flying....I dont know how to handle this. He wants to buy an airplane, train for licenses, and then use it on his weekly commute (4+hours) drive. I would like to teach him, but is that a conflict of interest? Like a Dr working on a family member? What kind of things are big points to look at when buying an airplane (Like a 1970's 172).
I only know two pairs of people that have done things like this, and one of them doesn't really apply.

One is a father and son who, when the son (age 23 and just finished college) does a lesson the dad just often tags along. Sits in the back on some dual XCs, sits in the right seat of the Warrior when Jr. is building some PIC XC time. This works out just fine because dad at his airline job doesn't fly a whole lot, and what flying he does is 100% long haul from JFK to one of three airports, so he loves to do some GA flying again. Plus, dad has less than a clue as to what the new airspace classes are such as class A, B, C, etc. and thus he feels like he has no right to suggest much more to his son other than very general things he remembers from his CFI days 30 years ago.

The other pair was different. Dad was a TWA captain at the time and son was in his late teenage years, and they were starting from zero hours with dad as CFI. Dad described it this way: "Like anything a dad tries to teach to his son at that age, this plan failed miserably, so we both thought it'd be a great idea for him to just go to Flight Safety and get his ratings there." Ha. So, this family member combo did not work out as well.

With all that said you are not in the same position as either of these two pairs. You are the younger one, plus, neither of you are in the rebellious years of your life so I don't think it would be a problem at all if you taught your dad how to fly. Just treat him like you'd treat any other student!
 

Nihon_Ni

Well-Known Member
I taught my wife to fly in our Grumman. The important thing is to realize you two will have a different relationship when it comes to flight training than you do anywhere else. For some people, that realationship just won't work without disrupting the primary relationship. My wife and I had a long talk after the first flight where we established how we would do training. I had certain demands if I was to be her CFI, and I pretty much got my way. She was different than any other student I've ever had, because sometimes I just couldn't put the same demands on her that I would on any other student. In the end, I think she got short-changed a little training, but I'm glad we did it this way. I didn't have the luxury of having another CFI to give her stage checks, but I think that would've been a good idea.
 
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