Easy Jet / Ryan Air

PhilosopherPilot

Well-Known Member
Hello all. I am doing a little traveling in Europe, and I have had the pleasure of flying on both Easy Jet and Ryan Air. Both are okay airlines as far as I can tell, just definitely budget.

I noticed that the first officer of the Easy Jet flight was American (perhaps Canadian). What would be necessary to fly commercially in the EU? I am commercially rated in the US, but I know I would have to get additional training in the EU.

I was very impressed with both airlines' efficiency. I bet the other EU carriers are a little scared of them.

I appreciate any comments.

Grayson
 

speedbird

New Member
You need a JAA frozen ATPL (CPL/IR/ME with ATPL written papers) or a JAA ATPL, with the required experience. Easyjet can hire you with 500hrs. Ryanair sometimes is the same, but its safer to assume 1500. Type rating in B737NG is always a plus.

Easyjet will train you as part of a special direct entry programme on B737NG, providing you have 500hrs, but Ryanair wants you to pay for your own type rating.Check their websites recruitment section at:
www.easyjet.com and www.ryanair.co.uk .

No other licenses are considered. European's tend to be skeptical about US license because of a belief of "rushed" and "conveyor belt" style training methods stateside. Plus you need Multi Crew training and a certificate to prove it. (essential)

Plus you must have the right to live in the EU with out restrictions. If your North American (Canadian/US citizen) you'd have an easier ride with immigration in comparison to someone from Africa or Caribbean or Middle East. (unfair but thats the way it is)
hope that was helpful

I'm 22 and I live in London!
 

secretapproach

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
Hello all. I am doing a little traveling in Europe, and I have had the pleasure of flying on both Easy Jet and Ryan Air. Both are okay airlines as far as I can tell, just definitely budget.

I noticed that the first officer of the Easy Jet flight was American (perhaps Canadian). What would be necessary to fly commercially in the EU? I am commercially rated in the US, but I know I would have to get additional training in the EU.

I was very impressed with both airlines' efficiency. I bet the other EU carriers are a little scared of them.

I appreciate any comments.

Grayson


[/ QUOTE ]

Although I believe it would take quite a bit of classroom time and some tests to get a JAA frozen ATPL, that will be the least of your troubles. The big road block to flying in Europe is that, for flying as with any other job in the EU, your potential employer has to make a case that they need to hire you because they have tried in good faith (they often have to show that they posted a job ad) to find an EU citizen to fill the position but were unsuccessful so they need you in all your splendor to do the job. An airline with stacks and stacks of pilot resumes from applicants from Portugal to the northeastern tip of Finland will be hard pressed to make that case for a non-EU citizen. That being said, I'm a US citizen who has worked in Europe for about four years now but not as a pilot.

While I was living in Germany I talked to a Lufthansa captain who told me that in times of pilot shortages it's possible for non-EU citizens to get hired. But right now there isn't a pilot shortage most anyplace in the world.

I work at a company in Portugal that employs almost 200 pilots and the other day I was in the HR assistant mananger's office when she rattled off the minimum requirements to a prospective pilot on the phone: X number of hours, ATPL, unrestricted authorization to work in the EU. I think most European airlines would say the same thing if you called them.

The American/Canadian EasyJet FO was probably has dual citizenship or is married to a European. BUT, PhilosopherPilot, if things pick up some day I may be in line with you trying to fly in Europe!
 

EatSleepFly

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
a JAA frozen ATPL

[/ QUOTE ]

Pardon my ignorance...I know what an ATPL is...but what exactly does "frozen" signify? Just curious...
 

secretapproach

New Member
You can get a JAA ATPL before reaching the minimum required flying hours but until you reach that number of flying hours, your ATPL is "frozen". I don't know what the numbers are, though. The JAA website might have some info.
 
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