Dispatcher/ Pilot ?

NEWBY101

New Member
Does having a private pilots license help with getting a job as a Dispatcher? I am about a month away from getting my private pilot rating, and I'm also starting the dispatcher course in August. Just wanted to know if it would help my chances for getting an offer, or are there plenty of dispatcher jobs out there?
 

JLF

Well-Known Member
Having a PPL certainly doesn't hurt. Flying was talked about during my dispatch interview. I would say it definitely helps your chances, but it's not explicitly required to get the job either.

Nice avatar too... I just bought, built, and sold this:




I got to ride it for free for a few months, and made a little money after it was all said and done.

Just trying to find ways to pad that FBO account.:p


Good luck to you.
 

NEWBY101

New Member
Having a PPL certainly doesn't hurt. Flying was talked about during my dispatch interview. I would say it definitely helps your chances, but it's not explicitly required to get the job either.

Nice avatar too... I just bought, built, and sold this:




I got to ride it for free for a few months, and made a little money after it was all said and done.

Just trying to find ways to pad that FBO account.:p


Good luck to you.

Great Bike!!! Apes are the only way to go for me. Thanks for the information also. I was wondering, I understand you get to ride in the cockpit of the aircrafts you are dispatching everyonce in a while(jumpseating?) When I get my commercial license will this help me in my career down the road as well? Looking to be a pilot of the big boys at some point. Thats if the motorcycle world doesnt suck me in first.:D
 

JLF

Well-Known Member
As far as being a pilot, it was good to have some insight into what the flight crew was actually doing up there. Though flying wise, it was totally different from what I'm accustomed to. The crew made it look easy and effortless too.

Dispatching is proving to be a very cool way to tide me over on the way to the professional cockpit. I like it a lot as far as a j-o-b goes.
 

NEWBY101

New Member
As far as being a pilot, it was good to have some insight into what the flight crew was actually doing up there. Though flying wise, it was totally different from what I'm accustomed to. The crew made it look easy and effortless too.

Dispatching is proving to be a very cool way to tide me over on the way to the professional cockpit. I like it a lot as far as a j-o-b goes.

Thanks a million! Just needed a little bit of insight. I guess I'm headed in the same direction. See you there.
 

mission_aviation

Well-Known Member
Most dispatcher jobs don't care about your flight training; however, dispatching isn't a bad job to have while working to get a pilot slot with the company you work for. Thats what I'm gonna do. As far as jobs, most people know little about dispatching except within the aviation community. Hell, when I told family and friends what I was going to school for, they thought it was with ATC. Second highest paid flight ops job in the industry and theres a demand for us right now.
 

CoBuilder

New Member
Most dispatcher jobs don't care about your flight training; however, dispatching isn't a bad job to have while working to get a pilot slot with the company you work for. Thats what I'm gonna do. As far as jobs, most people know little about dispatching except within the aviation community. Hell, when I told family and friends what I was going to school for, they thought it was with ATC. Second highest paid flight ops job in the industry and theres a demand for us right now.
I thought most flight dispatchers don't make much more than a first/second year regional FO. How hot is the demand for dispatchers nowadays?
 

69beers

Well-Known Member
Most jobs will start pretty low, but the potential is there to make well over 100k. It seems most of the demand right now, unfortunately, is at the lower paying regionals.

A private pilot ticket might help getting your initial job, but they are a dime a dozen after that. For your next job you'll be competing against commercial ratings, A&Ps, aviation degrees, ATC experience, and most importantly airline dispatching experience.
 

mission_aviation

Well-Known Member
I thought most flight dispatchers don't make much more than a first/second year regional FO. How hot is the demand for dispatchers nowadays?
Dispatchers make more then FOs period, but not captains. A dispatcher has an airman certificate and joint responsibility with the PIC. Yes even as a dispatcher, you can make 100K+ but it depends on who you work with and how long you work with them.
 

mission_aviation

Well-Known Member
Most jobs will start pretty low, but the potential is there to make well over 100k. It seems most of the demand right now, unfortunately, is at the lower paying regionals.

A private pilot ticket might help getting your initial job, but they are a dime a dozen after that. For your next job you'll be competing against commercial ratings, A&Ps, aviation degrees, ATC experience, and most importantly airline dispatching experience.
PPL or ratings will not matter at all. Dispatchers learn and test on ATP material. PPL and ratings have no credibility because dispatchers are certified airmen, just like Captains hense the joint responsibility for the legality of each and every 121 ops flight. You can be a dispatcher and then move up into a pilot slot when you reach the minimums for the airline you work for. I'm sure it will be easier to move up into a pilot slot if you know and work with the director of flight ops and the chief pilot everyday as a dispatcher.
 

69beers

Well-Known Member
PPL or ratings will not matter at all. Dispatchers learn and test on ATP material. PPL and ratings have no credibility because dispatchers are certified airmen, just like Captains hense the joint responsibility for the legality of each and every 121 ops flight. You can be a dispatcher and then move up into a pilot slot when you reach the minimums for the airline you work for. I'm sure it will be easier to move up into a pilot slot if you know and work with the director of flight ops and the chief pilot everyday as a dispatcher.
Very insightful....when do you get your dispatcher license?:rolleyes:

All ratings and aviation experience count. Stick time in an aircraft will gain you perspective that you don't get in front of a computer. Obviously the ATP written is far more advanced than a PPL ground school exam, but in real life every little bit counts. On my shift of 16 tonight we had 3 commercials and 3 IFRs (two guys are individual aircraft owners), a C130 navigator, 3 ex-USN ATCers, a former flight attendant, and I think there were a couple PPLs in there too, but I'm not 100% sure. Out of the 16 at least 6 pull in over 120K.

Your license will help you get an interview, and may help you do your job later, but part 121 dispatching experience is key.
 

mission_aviation

Well-Known Member
Very insightful....when do you get your dispatcher license?:rolleyes:

All ratings and aviation experience count. Stick time in an aircraft will gain you perspective that you don't get in front of a computer. Obviously the ATP written is far more advanced than a PPL ground school exam, but in real life every little bit counts. On my shift of 16 tonight we had 3 commercials and 3 IFRs (two guys are individual aircraft owners), a C130 navigator, 3 ex-USN ATCers, a former flight attendant, and I think there were a couple PPLs in there too, but I'm not 100% sure. Out of the 16 at least 6 pull in over 120K.

Your license will help you get an interview, and may help you do your job later, but part 121 dispatching experience is key.

I shouldn't speak for all Part 121 nor 135 carriers, and yes stick time could get you a different perspective, but it may not be the key to getting anyone hired. If an employer wants to hire a dispatcher, a person having PPL and ratings may be a sign that the candidate may only want to work as a dispatcher as a way to get in the door and then move to the flight deck, leaving the director of dispatch once again seeking another candidate. Remember, employers want to fill slots long-term not just open doors
 

69beers

Well-Known Member
This is basically a myth and your instructors should know better. Commercial, multi, and a realistic amount of hours, maybe. If anything it is used the other way around to string employees along to think they will get a shot at a pilot slot if they stay for a few years and do as they're told, only to never get a chance. I know of two dispatchers who have gone on to fly and it wasn't with their airline. I know far more who have the ratings and hours and chose to be a dispatcher instead. The majors aren't too worried at all about filling vacancies as there is a surplus of experienced dispatchers out there. A regional is more likely to lose dispatchers when they go on to do just about any other career for more money. The reality of it is there are few job openings at the majors and the regional pay is low enough to keep it a revolving door. One of my first interviews out of school was at a 121 regional. They wanted me to sign a 1 year "training" contract stating that I would have to pay them $3k if I quit within a year since they were "training" me. Their training was the FAR required initial training, not sending me to dispatcher school. I went elsewhere and was at a major within a year. Out of the 4 career-oriented managers I interviewed with only one is even still in the airline industry.
 

mission_aviation

Well-Known Member
This is basically a myth and your instructors should know better. Commercial, multi, and a realistic amount of hours, maybe. If anything it is used the other way around to string employees along to think they will get a shot at a pilot slot if they stay for a few years and do as they're told, only to never get a chance. I know of two dispatchers who have gone on to fly and it wasn't with their airline. I know far more who have the ratings and hours and chose to be a dispatcher instead. The majors aren't too worried at all about filling vacancies as there is a surplus of experienced dispatchers out there. A regional is more likely to lose dispatchers when they go on to do just about any other career for more money. The reality of it is there are few job openings at the majors and the regional pay is low enough to keep it a revolving door. One of my first interviews out of school was at a 121 regional. They wanted me to sign a 1 year "training" contract stating that I would have to pay them $3k if I quit within a year since they were "training" me. Their training was the FAR required initial training, not sending me to dispatcher school. I went elsewhere and was at a major within a year. Out of the 4 career-oriented managers I interviewed with only one is even still in the airline industry.
Congrats on your career, But its not how the rest of us will end up. I'm sticking with using my dispatcher certification only and applying for jobs. I would like to have an income while building hours. But think I'm going to spend the rest of my career at regional. I can't see myself having good timing like you. I think the bottom line is it depends on whose is the HR rep is, not everyone run out and get a PPL or ratings to try and get a competitive advantage. If you have them, good for you.
 

mission_aviation

Well-Known Member
Does having a private pilots license help with getting a job as a Dispatcher? I am about a month away from getting my private pilot rating, and I'm also starting the dispatcher course in August. Just wanted to know if it would help my chances for getting an offer, or are there plenty of dispatcher jobs out there?
Theres plenty of jobs on 121 and 135 operations. Regionals and supplementals not majors.
 

69beers

Well-Known Member
not everyone run out and get a PPL or ratings to try and get a competitive advantage. If you have them, good for you.
Agreed.

And it wasn't just timing, it was a huge amount luck and timing! There were a lot more dispatchers far more qualified than me interviewing back then. Military ATC on my resumee helped substantially on getting the interview, and the rest was up to me to close the deal. The odds were not in my favor and they probably aren't in yours either. Never say never.
 

mission_aviation

Well-Known Member
Agreed.

And it wasn't just timing, it was a huge amount luck and timing! There were a lot more dispatchers far more qualified than me interviewing back then. Military ATC on my resumee helped substantially on getting the interview, and the rest was up to me to close the deal. The odds were not in my favor and they probably aren't in yours either. Never say never.
AAAHHHH!!!!! Yes, Yes, luck and timing was very much on your side. But to have a military background was the absolutely the best part of the resume. I cannot agree with you more on that. I'm prior service myself. In fact I just ETS from active duty. I think that having the military background will far surpass any pilot ratings, especially having ATC as an MOS. There can be anyone that interviews for the same job with you and I. They could have 500+ hours ratings etc. but I can almost guarantee that with our military background, we will always get the job offer first. Instead of asking about having a PPL to get a job, maybe he/she should go active duty so this won't even be an issue.
 

NEWBY101

New Member
AAAHHHH!!!!! Yes, Yes, luck and timing was very much on your side. But to have a military background was the absolutely the best part of the resume. I cannot agree with you more on that. I'm prior service myself. In fact I just ETS from active duty. I think that having the military background will far surpass any pilot ratings, especially having ATC as an MOS. There can be anyone that interviews for the same job with you and I. They could have 500+ hours ratings etc. but I can almost guarantee that with our military background, we will always get the job offer first. Instead of asking about having a PPL to get a job, maybe he/she should go active duty so this won't even be an issue.
Well, most of your advice was great anyway!
 

manniax

Well-met in the Ka-tet
This is basically a myth and your instructors should know better. Commercial, multi, and a realistic amount of hours, maybe. If anything it is used the other way around to string employees along to think they will get a shot at a pilot slot if they stay for a few years and do as they're told, only to never get a chance. I know of two dispatchers who have gone on to fly and it wasn't with their airline. I know far more who have the ratings and hours and chose to be a dispatcher instead. The majors aren't too worried at all about filling vacancies as there is a surplus of experienced dispatchers out there. A regional is more likely to lose dispatchers when they go on to do just about any other career for more money. The reality of it is there are few job openings at the majors and the regional pay is low enough to keep it a revolving door. One of my first interviews out of school was at a 121 regional. They wanted me to sign a 1 year "training" contract stating that I would have to pay them $3k if I quit within a year since they were "training" me. Their training was the FAR required initial training, not sending me to dispatcher school. I went elsewhere and was at a major within a year. Out of the 4 career-oriented managers I interviewed with only one is even still in the airline industry.
I believe that at ExpressJet if you have your commercial and multi, and are working in dispatch, they will give you an interview for an FO position when it becomes available once you get 500 hours of total time. I never worked there, but some of my coworkers who did said that they knew a few people who had started there in dispatch and gotten pilot jobs with the carrier. ExpressJet has been downsizing of late though so there might not be that many pilot jobs available...I have heard that they're not a bad regional to work for, though.
 
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