Delta announce ATL-LAX-SYD ?

Timmypig

Well-Known Member
A thread on PPRuNe is reporting Delta to fly ATL-LAX-SYD from July .... I haven't seen any more news about it - is this right?

DL017 ATL1900 - 2040LAX2240 - 0640+2SYD 77L D
DL016 SYD0915 - 0600LAX0740 - 1455ATL 77L D

Some competition for the QF/United duopoly? A nightmare for the yet to fly VAus?
 

Derg

New Arizona, Il Duce/Warlord
Staff member
Sourced from airliners.net and I haven't seen anything on the DeltaNet or TravelNet either.
 

JEP

Malko In Charge
Staff member
Sourced from airliners.net and I haven't seen anything on the DeltaNet or TravelNet either.
Scooped on JetCareers The mother of all airline news... ;) You cannot get anything past its' members.....


This is in expedia's flight database for June:


15hr 0mn Los Angeles (LAX)
Depart 10:40 PM to Sydney (Kingsford Smith)
Arrive 6:40 AM
+2 days
Flight: 17
77L


13hr 45mn Sydney (Kingsford Smith)
Depart 9:15 AM to Los Angeles (LAX)
Arrive 6:00 AM
Flight: 16
77L
Yep, It's ATL-LAX-SYD-LAX-ATL. It took a while for it to get out. RA let it slip last week in the Flt Ops managers meeting.
 

Derg

New Arizona, Il Duce/Warlord
Staff member
How does Airliners.net bust out with the "scoop" days ahead?

Press Release Source: Delta Air Lines, Inc.

Delta Strengthens Los Angeles Gateway With New Nonstop Flights to Sydney, Sao Paulo, Increased Service to New York
Thursday December 18, 12:27 pm ET



Enhanced marketing alliance with Alaska Air Group enables Delta's
L.A. expansion with improved connections for customers across the
West Coast

Delta to become only U.S. airline to fly to six continents

ATLANTA, Dec. 18, 2008 -- (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Delta Air Lines (NYSE:DAL - News) will strengthen its gateway at Los Angeles International Airport in 2009 with the addition of its first-ever daily nonstop service between Los Angeles and Sydney, Australia* effective July 1; three-times weekly service between Los Angeles and Sao Paulo, Brazil* beginning May 21; and increased service between Atlanta and New York-JFK starting March 2.

Delta's growth at Los Angeles is supported by the recently announced expanded marketing agreement between Delta and Alaska Air Group that will make the two companies preferred partners on the West Coast and bolster connectivity at Los Angeles. The agreement will make Sydney, Sao Paulo, as well as Delta's existing international flights to Latin America, Tokyo-Narita**, Seoul-Inchon**, Guangzhou**, Amsterdam**, Paris-Charles De Gaulle** and other U.S. destinations more accessible to travelers from points throughout the West Coast via easy connections with Alaska Airlines and Horizon Air. Delta and its Northwest Airlines subsidiary together with Alaska and Horizon offer customers daily connections to approximately 45 nonstop destinations to, from and through Los Angeles.

With the addition of Sydney, Delta will become the only U.S. airline to fly to six continents, enhancing its position as the premier global airline.

``Delta's strategy of expanding our reach to select destinations while demonstrating capacity discipline in light of tough worldwide economic conditions continues to work and is paying off for our customers,'' said Glen Hauenstein, Delta's executive vice president, Network Planning and Revenue Management. ``Los Angeles is a critical gateway in our global network and today's announcement, coupled with Delta's enhanced alliance with Alaska Air Group, gives us the ability to support demand for air travel in key global economies.''

Beginning in March, Delta also will increase nonstop service between Los Angeles and New York-JFK from seven to eight daily flights to improve connections for New York and Northeast customers on long-haul international flights via Los Angeles. Additionally, Delta customers in the Southeastern U.S. will benefit from same-plane service between Atlanta and Sydney via LA.
 

kellwolf

Piece of Trash
Why does Delta discriminate against Antarctica?
That's what I'm saying. I mean, penguins need air service, too! Besides, you could build a runway long enough to land anything on down there. You could even use a contaminated landing chart NOT factoring in thrust reversers. :)
 

scooter2525

Very well Member
That's what I'm saying. I mean, penguins need air service, too! Besides, you could build a runway long enough to land anything on down there. You could even use a contaminated landing chart NOT factoring in thrust reversers. :)
I think they have a runway down there already. six miles or something like that. and the a320 (correct me if im wrong) is authorized to fly there.

little more info... http://www.aad.gov.au/default.asp?casid=33742
 

Kristie

Mama Bear....
Staff member
hmmm sounds like delta will be hiring soon...they'll need what, 2 different crews for that trip?
 

kellwolf

Piece of Trash
hmmm sounds like delta will be hiring soon...they'll need what, 2 different crews for that trip?
I can dream. :) Question is, will they just reduce domestic capacity and move crews from the domestic flights to the international flights or hire new crews? I think they number of crews is tied to the number of a/c and maybe not so much the flight schedule.
 

roundout

Bus Driver
Hope it's not on a 777.

************************************************************
NTSB ADVISORY
************************************************************
National Transportation Safety Board
Washington, DC 20594
December 18, 2008
************************************************************
NTSB INVESTIGATING LOSS OF ENGINE POWER ON DELTA AIR LINES
BOEING 777
************************************************************
The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating an incident in which a Delta Air Lines Boeing 777 experienced an uncommanded engine rollback in the cruise phase of an intercontinental flight.

On November 26, 2008, at about 12:30 pm MST, in the vicinity of Great Falls, Montana, a 777-200ER (N862DA), operated by Delta Air Lines as Flight 18, en route from Shanghai to Atlanta, experienced an uncommanded rollback of the right (number 2) Rolls-Royce Trent 895 engine while at 39,000 feet in the cruise phase of flight.

The crew executed applicable flight manual procedures and descended to 31,000 feet.

The engine recovered and responded normally thereafter. The flight continued to Atlanta where it landed without further incident. None of the crew of 15 or 232 passengers was injured.

Flight data recorders and other applicable data and components were retrieved from the airplane for testing and evaluation. Both of the pilots have been interviewed.

This event is preceded by another airline's 777 equipped with Rolls-Royce Trent 895 engines, which experienced an uncommanded dual engine rollback while on final approach to London's Heathrow International Airport on January 17, 2008, crashing short of the runway on airport property. The United Kingdom's Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) is investigating that accident.

NTSB Senior Air Safety Investigator Bill English, who is serving as the U.S. Accredited Representative in the Heathrow accident investigation, is the Investigator in Charge of the Delta incident.

The AAIB, which has assigned an Accredited Representative to the Delta incident, is working closely with the NTSB to determine if there are issues common to both events.

Parties to the investigation are: the Federal Aviation Administration, Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Eaton-Argotech, Delta Air Lines, and the Air Line Pilots Association.


###
 

Timmypig

Well-Known Member
Will Delta FAs require some coaching in Australian idiom? We'd all want to avoid a repeat of the misunderstanding a couple of years ago over an Australian passenger's use of "fair dinkum" on a SkyWest flight .....

Happy to assist if required, for a small fee.
 

fly22

Well-Known Member
This is great news!!! I'm a DL skymiles guy and it always pisses me off that I have to use UAL or QF to get down there

Finally!!!
 
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