Commercial Multi-Engine License or CFI?

Otto123

New Member
I am aware that this poses probably a 50/50 split in answers, but I am trying to figure out which way to go right now.

Thank you for your advice.
 

Bsmiller05

Well-Known Member
Comm Multi. Then either MEI, or get Comm Single & CFI. With the MEI, it just depends on multi prices (at least for me). I'm far from rich, so MEI wasn't an option...
 

v1valarob

Well-Known Member
CFI. Im assuming you have your single comm and are looking to either make the step to get your CFI or get the Multi add-on. The only reason I can see for getting the multi add on would be if you were planning on looking for jobs, however right now there aren't many jobs.

CFI now, make some money.
 

SFCC/UND

Well-Known Member
It all comes back to which you want to do. If you commercial then CFI your going to have to pay a lot. But if you do CFI then get some money, then it should help you a little. If you can find a job as a CFI, then I would do CFI first.
 
R

Roger, Roger

Guest
Will you be able to actually make money with a wet comm-multi?
Will you be able to actually make money with a CFI?
 

moxiepilot

Well-Known Member
I say go with CFI. There's not a huge market comparing the two. With a wet multi cert. you'll have, what? 25 hours? There's no job there.

With a single CFI, you can get a job and be paid to fly.

As you do that you can get your multi add on (or be paid by your employer to get the multi add on and MEI)
 

Otto123

New Member
I do have my CSEL yes. The reason for the post is because of the last handful of business/carrier/cargo pilots I have spoken with have said get the CMEL. It raised a flag for me after reading so many posts on people being furloughed, etc. My first route of choice has always been the CFI route, but lately that has come under scrutiny.

I, like most of you all out there, am not rich. So I have make my choices wisely as to which route to take.

Again, I appreciate all your help and advice.
 

Low&Slow

Ancora imparo
If I had it to do all over again, I would get the CFI then the CFII, then the MEL comm, then the MEI.

You need to define your goals and create a plan. Getting the Multi-engine commercial first is like building a roof before you've built the foundation and walls to put it on. Doesn't make any sense.

Trust me, I was young and dumb a long time ago and went MEL commercial first. Significant events in my life occurred almost immediately following that and I was not able to continue flight training. If I had my CFI instead, I probably could have stayed in the game.

This is my advice, take it or leave it, it won't hurt my feelings either way.
 

slushie

C56X ATP CFII MEI
getting the multi comm before cfi worked great for me...until Scenic stopped hiring and Vision furloughed people... :/
 

granlistillo

Well-Known Member
I do have my CSEL yes. The reason for the post is because of the last handful of business/carrier/cargo pilots I have spoken with have said get the CMEL. It raised a flag for me after reading so many posts on people being furloughed, etc. My first route of choice has always been the CFI route, but lately that has come under scrutiny.

I, like most of you all out there, am not rich. So I have make my choices wisely as to which route to take.

Again, I appreciate all your help and advice.
Otto,
A year ago getting the CMEL might have been good advice if you had a reasonable amount of flight time. In the current market, unless you have part 135 single pilot ifr mins, it doesnt make much sense right now.
Getting a multi with 15 hrs and not flying multi in 2 years wouldnt be all that attractive to an employer.
i would get the cfi, but would somehow try to develop a plan to get the multi if things changed.
 

mhcasey

Well-Known Member
My first route of choice has always been the CFI route, but lately that has come under scrutiny.
:confused:

I did the CFI. Worked for a while, got a discounted rate on my Comm multi, CFII, and MEI. Worked out well for me.
:yeahthat:

A request of all JC members: Justify your statements here. Don't just say "Com AMEL" with no further details...I don't think the guy is looking for a poll or he would have just set that up.

I'm with Mojo. I've never paid full price for a rating - I spent a lot of time washing airplanes though :(.

There are no jobs right now. CFI and get paid to fly!
 

germb747

Well-Known Member
Like previously mentioned, it comes down to your personal situation and goals. If you want to fly for a living, you'll probably end up doing all of the above anyway, so it really doesn't matter what order you do them in. Keep in mind that renting a twin is significantly more expensive than renting a single, so if you're budget limited (and who isn't these days?) then you might want to knock out the CFI first before you get involved with multi flying.
 

Otto123

New Member
Thank you for everyone's advice and comments. I have chosen to take the CFI route given that regardless of what flying job I have, I want to teach.

I can't imagine that gaining the knowledge from teaching would be a bad thing.

Again, thank you all for your advice.
 

wrxpilot

New Member
Apparently you've already made your decision, but here's what I did and recommend: Get your CMEL add on, then your CFI. Why?

You can get your multi add on fairly quickly and cheaply. There's a school down in Dallas called "Guaranteed Multiengine Ratings". They charge $1,395 plus the examiner fee (probably $350 or so these days). You'll be done in a week or less. Their phone number is (817) 557-4004. I spent A LOT of time researching multi schools a couple of yrs ago, and this is what people recommended. It's like drinking from a fire hose, so you have to work and study your butt off while you're there. But it's the real deal and they've got a good program that they've used for many, many years. The planes aren't pretty, but they get the job done.

Why get the multi first? It is much more difficult to spend time studying and prepping for a multi checkride when you're busy instructing. There's also an opportunity cost when you're busy studying instead of making money, and you could very well lose students to other instructors.

You also never know when opportunities will arise for logging multi time. The vast majority of people on this site give advice as if everybody is working towards an airline career. Just because the airlines aren't hiring, that doesn't mean there aren't plenty of opportunities to sit right seat in a king air or something at a little 135 charter op.

Because I had my multi commercial when I started teaching, I was able to take advantage of a situation like that. A lot of my fellow CFIs at the time couldn't, because they didn't have their multi. I'm now sitting right seat in a corporate jet, and many of them are still flight instructing in a 172.
 

Buzo

Well-Known Member
I was in the same situation in September of 2001. I was just finishing my CSEL, and had to determine the best route for me. I had very little money to spend, and had to use it wisely. The CFI would get me started making some money. The CMEL would cost me the same amount up front, but would not help the lack of income.

I also knew that I would not be able to afford to maintain my currency or proficiency in a twin. I got the CFI, started instructing, and started working down my debt. After 7 months or so of instructing, I started my multi. I got the multi in Sept of 2002, and my CFII and MEI at the same time a month later.

I was aslo able to use the tax benefits for the additional training.
 

deek

New Member
I guess I'm kinda in the same shoes, just a few months back. Current working on time building for the CSEL rating. Then I plan on getting my CFI/II and getting a job instructing, that way I can take advantage of "employee rates" on the twin and get the add-on for cheaper, now I guess this means less multi-time, but I've got time on my side to build it up before the next hiring wave in say oh late 2009, 2010. I figure it's the cheaper way to go, and that's #1 in my book.
 

CoffeeIcePapers

Well-Hung Member
I guess I'm kinda in the same shoes, just a few months back. Current working on time building for the CSEL rating. Then I plan on getting my CFI/II and getting a job instructing, that way I can take advantage of "employee rates" on the twin and get the add-on for cheaper, now I guess this means less multi-time, but I've got time on my side to build it up before the next hiring wave in say oh late 2009, 2010. I figure it's the cheaper way to go, and that's #1 in my book.

Also, you can ask your co-workers to train you at a discounted rate, AKA a bottle of booze or lunch. I have no problems giving fellow employees free instruction.
 

SeattlePilot

Well-Known Member
My recommendation will be CFI. Then find a work in a school and then qualify for their multi.

I always tell students not to be attracted to fast and cheap method of multi time unless you will work for that flight school.
To give you an idea, our insurance requires you to have 250 TT and 25 MM to be able to rent the plane. If you get your rating or license in the twin from us those requirements are waived.

So, let's say that you are going to get the rating from ATP at $3000. Then in order to rent our airplane you will have to pay 25 hours of rental at 279/hr and 60/hr for instructor. Just to get checked out in the plane is going to cost you $8500. That is in addition of $3000 that you paid.

On the other hand if you were a CFI with us, noone charges you instruction and then say you got your license through us in 10 hrs (ME add on) . With employee discount and no CFI cost your me add on will be only $2590 and you will qualify to rent the airplane the moment you have your Comm ME.

Good luck..

SeattlePilot
 
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