Children of the magenta

Stone Cold

Well-Known Member
Not to pick nits, but isn't that FlightAware in video? FA was started in 2000s. If this is indeed FA, this can't be a video from the 90's.
I believe the footage is mostly from 2007/08, but @mikecweb can probably be more specific.
Most of this video is definitely from after '05. The Operations center is the new building at LCK. I was hired at the old building in spring '05, and started indoc at the new building June 05, I believe it was.

Mike even has a cameo in the Turbine Suburban. Guillotine was fired in '07 I believe (keep those charts up to date, people haha).

There might be some old video in there, but the guy that made that video was JJ I believe, and this wasn't posted by him. He's the second video posted.
 
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USMCmech

Well-Known Member
Most of this video is definitely from after '05. The Operations center is the new building at LCK. I was hired at the old building in spring '05, and started indoc at the new building June 05, I believe it was.

Mike even has a cameo in the Turbine Suburban. Guillotine was fired in '07 I believe (keep those charts up to date, people haha).

There might be some old video in there, but the guy that made that video was JJ I believe, and this wasn't posted by him. He's the second video posted.
I can guess the basic story about N1814W, Hangar Queen that nobody wants. That or bad JuJu on it from some accidents or incidents. Can anyone clue me in on any specifics.

At Martinaire, we had N9505B which was on it's 5th life. One midair, ate a goose leading to a bad rough field landing, picked up and tossed by a microburst in DRT, and one other that I forget. After I left, it had a full electrical rebuild due to some failure, so it's on life # 6 now.

0668815.jpg


At a certain point you either look at it as bad luck or un-killable depending on your philosophy.
 

Beep

Well-Known Member
I can guess the basic story about N1814W, Hangar Queen that nobody wants. That or bad JuJu on it from some accidents or incidents. Can anyone clue me in on any specifics.

At Martinaire, we had N9505B which was on it's 5th life. One midair, ate a goose leading to a bad rough field landing, picked up and tossed by a microburst in DRT, and one other that I forget. After I left, it had a full electrical rebuild due to some failure, so it's on life # 6 now.

View attachment 55582

At a certain point you either look at it as bad luck or un-killable depending on your philosophy.
I remember some of the pilots calling it 9505Boom
 

mikecweb

Well-Known Member
Looks like it was fun bro. It was always what I wanted to do to cut my teeth in aviation.
Airnet and when i got hired was absolutely pure luck and i credit that for where i am today. Literally 10 flight hours allowed my seniority to be one number higher which allowed me to upgrade to Lear captain. That opened many doors that otherwise would have never happened.
 

knot4u

Repeat Offender
As a young man working line service at KBUR in the early '90s I was witness to many shady operators running checks, it seems almost ridiculous today that the actual check or other document had to be moved physically. I would sometimes work second shift and occasionally one of the helicopter pilots would show up for fuel without their loader, I was happy to fill the seat free of charge after I clocked out. Landing on top of the tallest buildings downtown was a rush. We'd fly downtown, grab the bags and head to the Ameriflight ramp to offload and then the pilot would do me the favor of dropping me off on my ramp at around 1 am. Back then the lobby of the FBO in the dark hours might be occupied by a strange mix of people, sometimes you'd make a friend. There was one girl who flew a clapped out C-310 that took off one night and never came back, still makes me sad.
 

Richman

That's "Lord Garth" to you
Still wish they used paper. The number of times I had to I intervene to unfluck some snafu has increased significantly since everything went electronic. It’s VERY hard to do if there’s no paper.

Now get off my lawn.
 

Autothrust Blue

Very querulous
Still wish they used paper. The number of times I had to I intervene to unfluck some snafu has increased significantly since everything went electronic. It’s VERY hard to do if there’s no paper.

Now get off my lawn.
Thanks, now I'm sitting in my office wondering if I did my load closeout correctly this morning.
 

CoffeeIcePapers

Well-Hung Member
I've done 141 flight school, 135 single pilot, 142 training center and 121. I'll take the 121 guy anytime over the 135/91 guy. Mainly, because he's a known quantity. 135 guys (I'm one of them) don't really get the big picture: In the grand scheme of things, what we do isn't that important. You can always delay, divert, or do any number of things that will greatly enhance the margin of safety. I've seen too many guys doing random crap in the sim when I was a 142 instructor to make me feel easy flying on any random charter. 121 invests time and money into standardizing to help eliminate even the worst pilot from the equation, who is fairly safe considering his peers flying under 91/135.
 

jynxyjoe

The Kickin' Chicken!
This whole thread is so full of win.

Recently flew a GA airplane, same problem as always, flying is hilariously easy but i cant taxi fast or slow. Im like a taildragger in GA. Great in the air, or completely stopped on the ground. Between 0.1knt and 45knt on the ground im dangerous. Ymmv
 

Autothrust Blue

Very querulous
121 invests time and money into standardizing to help eliminate even the worst pilot from the equation, who is fairly safe considering his peers flying under 91/135.
It's not so much elimination as it is spending time, effort, design and money to ensure that the worst two knuckleheads in any given category (and to be abundantly clear, they're all out there and every operation has at least two of 'em) can lose the engine taking off of the mountainous jungle airport at 0235 LDT, "select heading, activate the secondary, manage nav, I have control and ATC, ECAM actions" and so forth without breaking too much of a sweat, coming perilously and noncompliantly close to the terrain, or losing control of the aircraft or situation.

In theory, anyway; my old job apparently had/has a rule that bars two people on Special Tracking from flying with one another, which sounds like a great risk management move but is more about not having that level of training, standards and checking. Because again, the two worst guys/gals in the whole operation should be able to can the motor at V1 in (wherever) and not hit anything.
 

Space Monkey

Well-Known Member
It's not so much elimination as it is spending time, effort, design and money to ensure that the worst two knuckleheads in any given category (and to be abundantly clear, they're all out there and every operation has at least two of 'em) can lose the engine taking off of the mountainous jungle airport at 0235 LDT, "select heading, activate the secondary, manage nav, I have control and ATC, ECAM actions" and so forth without breaking too much of a sweat, coming perilously and noncompliantly close to the terrain, or losing control of the aircraft or situation.

In theory, anyway; my old job apparently had/has a rule that bars two people on Special Tracking from flying with one another, which sounds like a great risk management move but is more about not having that level of training, standards and checking. Because again, the two worst guys/gals in the whole operation should be able to can the motor at V1 in (wherever) and not hit anything.
I don't always design or spend money on how I eliminate, but when I do... it does take time and effort.
 
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