CFI or not

green hornet

New Member
Just a quick question on what seems to be a pretty intense subject. Do those that think everyone should go the CFI route before any other type of paid flying job, also think that by the same token, a new A&P should be a maintenance instructor before taking a job actually doing what they have proved to the FAA that they are qualified to perform? Maybe instructors on the flying, and the MX side, both should have some practical experience before they attempt to pass on the vast knowledge that is rattling around in thier heads.
 

Goonie

Never say die
Just a quick question on what seems to be a pretty intense subject. Do those that think everyone should go the CFI route before any other type of paid flying job, also think that by the same token, a new A&P should be a maintenance instructor before taking a job actually doing what they have proved to the FAA that they are qualified to perform? Maybe instructors on the flying, and the MX side, both should have some practical experience before they attempt to pass on the vast knowledge that is rattling around in thier heads.
Before I respond I have too ask. Are you asking if you should be an A&P instructor or just making an analogy?
 

green hornet

New Member
Analogy all the way baby! I could have used any kind of skilled position for my question, but I used MX since it is so close to home. By the way I'm not trying to spin anybody up, I'm only trying to understand the logic of some of the threads I've read here.
 

Goonie

Never say die
Gotcha.

I do agree that some people probably jump into CFI a little early.

Looking back to when I was a Green CFI 7 years ago (Damn its been that long?) I made some boneheaded mistakes. I remember telling someone that a Arrow has a gravity fed fuel system (I had never flown a low wing plane) and having to explain myself the next day. :D

Seriously, some CFI's are good at camouflaging their inexperience...some not so much.

The fact is their is no way to gain experience instructing someone without doing it.
 

green hornet

New Member
Just seems to me that you could really pass on some bad habits and not even know it without spending time as a SIC for some real world experience.
 

moxiepilot

Well-Known Member
Green Hornet -

First, you posted the question; show some respect for the people who contribute, or you wont get a warm reception.

Second, this isn't a forum where people puff out their chests, bang on them like apes, and say I know more than you for the sake of feeling good about themselves.

Third, I don't know many 40 year olds that post on the web using youthful tone of responding with the term "dude." I'm assuming you're not above 40ish. No matter your experience, if you started being a wrench monkey at 16, there are folks here with more experience than you.

However, with your other posts regarding instrument training, I doubt your flying experience is all that much. Reference May 22, 2008:

green hornet
I passed my private check ride last Saturday. It felt great

*snip*

I have been in the industry for 23 years with four different airlines as a line A&P
Just because you're new to the flight side of the industry, doesn't mean you have to prove yourself. People are here to help others learn.

Next, do you know the difference between the roles of an A&P and an IA, what their privileges are, and the necessary requirements to obtain an IA? The reason I ask is it seems to me you fail to see the comparason I was pointing out.

Finally, I'm sure people will respond to you, and your questions - if you're willing to listen.

Good luck to you.
 
R

Roger, Roger

Guest
Is inexperienced pilots teaching even less-experienced pilots the best way to do things? Probably not.

However, that seems to be the way the aviation industry works, and has worked for the last several decades (with the exception of those rare, outstanding individuals who do decide to make teaching their career, and do a dang good job of it). It's not likely to change quickly.
 

green hornet

New Member
Moxiepilot, thanks for your response. If you read my earlier post, I was looking for some insight, not trying to get anyones hackles up or do any chest puffing. Your comparison between an IA and a CFI was out in left field to me and I was only being playfully sarcastic. By the way I've been an A&P for over 20 years and I'm 42 years old. How I talk is up to me, free country last time I checked. I don't care if you believe me or not, I have nothing to prove to you. My PPL is recent and the questions I've asked about IR training and PFT have only been asked out of desire to make myself a better pilot. Obviously if you express an opinion on this forum different from the click, you will get sliced and diced, maybe I should find my information elsewhere. Thanks anyway for your time.
 

ILS37R

Well-Known Member
Until there are a lot more jobs kicking around for pilots with less than 500TT, and financial incentive for becoming an instructor later in the career progression, the question is moot.

Alas, acquiring a vast pool of non-instructing experience to pass along with wet-ink Commercial/Instrument hours can be a tall order and--once one has that experience--there are a lot of better jobs out there (well... maybe not right now, but generally speaking).

If you have a bright idea to tweak the system and make the question relevant, I'm all ears.
 
R

Roger, Roger

Guest
Yeah. I wish things worked out such that the only people teaching were the old, crusty airline captains, freight dogs, and military jet jocks, and other people with tons of real-world experience. It can be a little frustrating when only 3 or 4 people on your school's staff of 15 have real-world (outside the tightly controlled boundaries of flight training operations) flying experience.
 

milleR

Well-Known Member
It sounds like a fair comparison to me. Please correct me if I'm wrong, but as an IA you have to sign off on work that other A&P's have done, much like a CFI has to sign off on a student as being prepared for whatever is ahead of them. Both are responsible for the work that has been completed and both are responsible for the outcome. Granted, an A&P also has his name on any repairs/changes/alternations to an aircraft, but the ultimate responsibility comes back to the higher level of authority.
 

sdfcvoh

This is my Custom Title
Just a quick question on what seems to be a pretty intense subject. Do those that think everyone should go the CFI route before any other type of paid flying job, also think that by the same token, a new A&P should be a maintenance instructor before taking a job actually doing what they have proved to the FAA that they are qualified to perform? Maybe instructors on the flying, and the MX side, both should have some practical experience before they attempt to pass on the vast knowledge that is rattling around in thier heads.
If any part of your body says, "I would dig showing people how to do this, and I think it would be fun." Do it.

Otherwise, don't.
 

green hornet

New Member
It sounds like a fair comparison to me. Please correct me if I'm wrong, but as an IA you have to sign off on work that other A&P's have done, much like a CFI has to sign off on a student as being prepared for whatever is ahead of them. Both are responsible for the work that has been completed and both are responsible for the outcome. Granted, an A&P also has his name on any repairs/changes/alternations to an aircraft, but the ultimate responsibility comes back to the higher level of authority.
An IA is another set of eyes to verify work is accomplished in accordance with the proper authority, not an A&P instructor. Now that said, my original post deals with CFI vs PFT. MX was only an example, it can be replaced in the post with any skilled position. I guess my first post should not have been a question, but rather an opinion. I've read many posts on this forum that seem to point the finger of hate at people that choose not to CFI but to pay for training instead. That attitude is wrong. I realize CFI is the only avenue open to many low time pilots but there are options out there. It's only money man.
 

Patrick

Well-Known Member
We can debate this question back and forth all day, and I will stand by my opinion that I think CFI-ing is a good way for a low timer to build hours, and learn a lot in the process. It is a less than ideal situation when you get a brand new CFI with a student, but that's the way it's been for decades, and I doubt that will change.

The reality of the current situation, however, is such that for anyone under 500 hours, and at this point, almost under 1000 hours, there really isn't much paid piloting to be had outside of instructing. Take that for the reality that it's worth.
 
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