Cessnas verse Pipers

gromm44

Well-Known Member
I have 85 hours in cessna 152s abd 172s. But I really havent flown in 15 years, so Im going to need a lot of time just to get current. After doing some research I found out I can rent a Piper Warrior with an instructor for $35 dollars an hour less than I can get training in a 172(at my local airports). It seems too good to be true. I still have to check out the facility further, but so far it seems legit. Can anybody tell me if there is a disadvantage in going with the Pipers or is it all just a matter of taste?
 

DPApilot

GUYSH! GUYSH! GUYSH!
I have 85 hours in cessna 152s abd 172s. But I really havent flown in 15 years, so Im going to need a lot of time just to get current. After doing some research I found out I can rent a Piper Warrior with an instructor for $35 dollars an hour less than I can get training in a 172(at my local airports). It seems too good to be true. I still have to check out the facility further, but so far it seems legit. Can anybody tell me if there is a disadvantage in going with the Pipers or is it all just a matter of taste?

I go from an Arrow to a 172M and SP to a DA40.

All are different, but if you can get a warrior for 35 bucks cheaper go for it!
 

KC Jake

Well-Known Member
The two companies make relatively different aircraft. However, the differences aren't so much that you won't know what you're doing. Plus, if you haven't flown in fifteen years, you're going to struggle no matter what plane you're in. Might as well fly the one that's less expensive.
 

PGT

Well-Known Member
I have 55 hours in Pipers and just under 50 in Cessnas.

This depends, I say go for the Warrior if it's cheaper, if not I'd go Cessna just because you'll be flying them more later on.

For example, I got my PPL in a Piper Cherokee and when I quit the flying club i had to rent Cessna's to fly. Well I needed a checkout so 3 different Cessna's = ~4 hours of flight time plus instruction that I had to pay for. (~$500).

No real difference other than landing but you get used to it. I do favor Pipers panel for some reason.
 

MarkE

Murrrrrph!
The two companies make relatively different aircraft. However, the differences aren't so much that you won't know what you're doing. Plus, if you haven't flown in fifteen years, you're going to struggle no matter what plane you're in. Might as well fly the one that's less expensive.
:yeahthat:

I fly both the 172 and Archer and really flying is flying. The only difference I can think of is a slightly different sight picture but that's about it. Fuel systems are a little different as well but since you'll be going up with an instructor he'll get you up to speed in no time.
 

Hubbs

Well-Known Member
I have 120hrs in Cessnas (including 60ish in a C177RG) and about 140 in Cherokees, and daily switch between the Cherokee and the Cardinal.

Personally it has never been an issue transitioning from one to another, so if I was in your situation I would fly the cheapest. However, it is my goal to fly professionally and so I will need to be able to fly different types of planes, and I feel it makes me ever-so-slightly more versatile. That being said, if you are just going to fly occasionally for fun then you should do whatever you are more comfortable with. Also I am cheap and $35/hr is not insignificant to me.
 

JoelT

Well-Known Member
I instructed in both for three years. It's really six or one half dozen the other. But, I do think that a Cessna has a very slight advantage for training purposes just because of the utility category (it spins really well). The Piper has a slight edge as a being a little bit more comfortable on a cross-country. Also, I like the manual flaps better. You really can't go wrong either way.
 

Holocene

Well-Known Member
Over 100hrs in a Cherokee, maybe 10 or 15 in a 172.

They're both great planes. The Piper does seem slightly easier to fly in a general sense. Note the dihedral angle on the Pipers is a bit more than what Cessna uses.

Also, I don't know why, but I HATE that silly flap switch in the Cessna. Give me a lever any day. But with Cessna, no switching tanks and screwing around with fuel pumps en route.
 

USMCmech

Well-Known Member
Debating the differences between the PA-28 and the C-172 is so minute that your average low time pilot will never notice them. It's like the argument between the Camero and the Mustang.

Both are fine trainers, go with which is cheapest (provided they are both in good mechanical condition).
 

Crockrocket94

Well-Known Member
It really comes down to preference.

I like the brake and steering system in the Pa28's much more than those in cessnas.

Flying wise, its preference again, do you like seeing alot of ground below you or alot of sky around you? Do you like manual or electric flaps? Ive got a little over 1200 hours in pipers and maybe 100 in Cessna's, so i am a little biased due to experience.

I prefer the piper because to me, TO ME, it feels a little sturdier.
 

gromm44

Well-Known Member
Thanks everybody for your input> I feel better now. Ill probably give the Pipers a try. If they are relatively the same I might as well save the money
 

SeanD

Well-Known Member
I prefer the Piper. I like the throttle location and feel along with the manual flaps. Its too easy to over do a flap on the 172s electric flap. I also prefer the low wing.
 

Dazzler

Well-Known Member
Relative advantages of both:

CESSNA:
- better ventillation
- both doors open
- easier to takeoff (for me) - suffers less from ground effect due to higher wing
- no need to switch tanks
- rear window

PIPER:
- little roomier inside
- manual flaps (less to go wrong!)
- easier to land (for me) - take advantage of ground effect, but don't float too far!
- easier to peek into the fuel tanks
- feels (to me) a little more rock-solid in the air

AT THE END OF THE DAY:
money makes airplane fly, so go with the least expensive
 

Boris Badenov

Just running in to a burning house...
I think somebody else said it, but fly what you're going to fly. If the goal is a monkey suit and a CRJ at warp speed, it matters not at all. Go with the cheap one and save your money for food.
 

HeyEng

NAHB Doesn't Give a Crap
I will pretty much agree with everyone here. I had about 40 hours in -172s before switching to the Cherokee. To me, the Piper was just a bit easier to fly. I also think the Cherokee is easier to land, especially in wicked crosswinds. But, just my opinion. If I saved $35, I would fly just about anything.
 

tlewis95

I drive planes
How about a Cessna 140 vs Piper J3 Cub comparison?

I have about 15 hours in each now.

Pros of the C140
faster
radios
electrical system
starter
flaps
brakes
easier to taxi

for the cub -
more fun
open door
no radio
no starter
brakes dont work
hard to taxi (plus the need for s-turns)
easier to fly by a longshot

ehhhh, I love them both.

172 vs a Cherokee or Archer?

Skyhawk by far.

Where I rent, the Skyhawk and Archer are the same price, and the 140 and the Cub are the same price...
 
Top