Building a Competitive resume

CFmike

Well-Known Member
Hi everyone, I am about to start my last year of college and wanted to do a bit of research about what airlines like to see on resumes and what applications will better one's chances of getting picked first.

My long term goals would be to fly for a fractional such as Net Jets, Flex, etc. Any of the nice majors would be nice too but I really like the idea of flying biz jets around the world.

I got some advice from a fellow worker to 'stick with it'. In this industry seniority is everything, so changing companies every year or two doesn't do much good.

I plan on getting my CFI and doing that gig for a while but if anyone could shed some insight on what to stay away from too, that would be a big help! Thanks in advance!
 

higney85

Property of Scheduling
While hindsight is 20/20 and everyone is different this is what I would say.. As a background I am 23 at a regional with a 4-yr degree. Did the CFI thing to build my time.


To someone getting into this industry: have a degree in something other than aviation (or at least other than "pilot"). There are quite a few on here that unfortunately are being furloughed and some are in the predicament of having most of the eggs in one basket. Next, INSTRUCT- get the CFI/II/MEI and build your time LEARNING from your students. Beyond that its all about networking. While you are working towards the CFI get a part time job at the local FBO- be yourself and you will make plenty of friends out of the local "regulars". Before you know it you will have the opportunity to fly many different aircraft and expand the network. Beyond the year or so of instructing you can look into your options depending on the market and depending on what YOU want. This forum is great for the info, but its all about what YOU want. Once you have some time instructing your choices are (typically in an ever changing industy) a regional, 135 freight, or knowing someone and getting a corporate co-pilot gig in a kingair/small jet. For quantity of time its hard to beat regionals- jet time all over the US and can fly close to 1000 hours a year, 135 freight seems to be all over the map (someone else can fill you in- I have no 135 experience), and corporate is the way to go IF you want to stay corporate and you happen to know the right folks.


The airline to corporate transisiton is not too common- airline pilots develop the "airline stink" and many corp companies shy away because 121 pilots are soo accustomed to having everything done for them.


So for now- get the degree done, instruct, and network!
 

ZapBrannigan

Old School
The airline to corporate transisiton is not too common- airline pilots develop the "airline stink" and many corp companies shy away because 121 pilots are soo accustomed to having everything done for them.
The flight department I work for has former airline pilots from:

Delta,
TWAamerican,
US Airways,
Eagle,
Comair,
ASA,
Aloha Island Air,
Corporate Express,
Midwest Express,
and more...

Working for us. We are in the minority to be certain, but I don't believe that the "airline stink" is as pervasive a problem as people make it out to be. Would be a good one for Mythbusters to take on.

(In the same episode they could do, "When the economy turns south the first thing to go is the airplane!")
 

n57flyguy

Well-Known Member
Hi everyone, I am about to start my last year of college and wanted to do a bit of research about what airlines like to see on resumes and what applications will better one's chances of getting picked first.

My long term goals would be to fly for a fractional such as Net Jets, Flex, etc. Any of the nice majors would be nice too but I really like the idea of flying biz jets around the world.

I got some advice from a fellow worker to 'stick with it'. In this industry seniority is everything, so changing companies every year or two doesn't do much good.

I plan on getting my CFI and doing that gig for a while but if anyone could shed some insight on what to stay away from too, that would be a big help! Thanks in advance!
Become a part time line service person, and I'm not just saying that becuase I am one, you will make connections with some hard work. It is also a great way to get perspective on a wide varity of corporate flying that goes through the FBO. Good work ethic can go along way while being a line person and you never know who is watching.
 

n57flyguy

Well-Known Member
We are in the minority to be certain, but I don't believe that the "airline stink" is as pervasive a problem as people make it out to be. Would be a good one for Mythbusters to take on.

(In the same episode they could do, "When the economy turns south the first thing to go is the airplane!")
I have heard specifically from airline pilots, "I would never go corporate, sucking up to some rich guy and getting the ice..." While most of the time I feel it is a misconception about corporate flying, sucking up is only a case sometimes, it is their impression. I think this is the impression that flight departments get as well. I guess what it comes down to is networking and attitude of the person being interviewed.
 

CoffeeIcePapers

Well-Hung Member
To someone getting into this industry: have a degree in something other than aviation (or at least other than "pilot"). There are quite a few on here that unfortunately are being furloughed and some are in the predicament of having most of the eggs in one basket.

Without useful job experience, this type of degree is going to be worth just as much as your aviation degree. There have been some threads posted on here from people who went from a pilot position that want to move to something like management, but are discriminated against for pilots. The employers feel like going from the "crazy wild fun" cockpit to a desk would be too boring.

If you plan on getting a degree in another field, it would be to your benefit to work on your flight training on the side, while you get some useful job experience doing something that you would to school for.
 

higney85

Property of Scheduling
Without useful job experience, this type of degree is going to be worth just as much as your aviation degree. There have been some threads posted on here from people who went from a pilot position that want to move to something like management, but are discriminated against for pilots. The employers feel like going from the "crazy wild fun" cockpit to a desk would be too boring.

If you plan on getting a degree in another field, it would be to your benefit to work on your flight training on the side, while you get some useful job experience doing something that you would to school for.

So what do you say when a 25-30 year old loses his medical and only has a degree in "pilot"? If you already have a business or mgmt degree you can easily take a year to get a masters or simply just get into the work force- sure you will have to work your way up like you would have at age 22 when you first graduated but a "pilot" degree won't help you much if you can't use it. Just my thoughts but everyone has there own opinions and ideas...
 

CoffeeIcePapers

Well-Hung Member
So what do you say when a 25-30 year old loses his medical and only has a degree in "pilot"? If you already have a business or mgmt degree you can easily take a year to get a masters or simply just get into the work force- sure you will have to work your way up like you would have at age 22 when you first graduated but a "pilot" degree won't help you much if you can't use it. Just my thoughts but everyone has there own opinions and ideas...
You just stated yourself that the 4 year degree is useless, if you need a Master's degree to get an entry level position. Being 40 years+ and 20 years removed from your field of study isn't going to benefit you much in the job market without some real work experience.
 

skydog

New Member
Hi everyone, I am about to start my last year of college and wanted to do a bit of research about what airlines like to see on resumes and what applications will better one's chances of getting picked first.

My long term goals would be to fly for a fractional such as Net Jets, Flex, etc. Any of the nice majors would be nice too but I really like the idea of flying biz jets around the world.

I got some advice from a fellow worker to 'stick with it'. In this industry seniority is everything, so changing companies every year or two doesn't do much good.

I plan on getting my CFI and doing that gig for a while but if anyone could shed some insight on what to stay away from too, that would be a big help! Thanks in advance!

First off, let's clarify that a resume is just a vehicle for conveying your qualifcations to a second party. Concentrate on developing your qualifications, not your resume.

My philiosophy in this regard is that it is not the number of hours or ratings that get you noticed, it is the range of experiences you have had. Everybody and his brother has an ATP and 1000 TPIC. But how many have experience as, say, a ground school instructor, chief pilot, or check airman? What looks more interesting to you? A guy who has spent the last 5 years and 4000 hours zipping around as an RJ captain, or someone who played an active role in bring ACARS online at his last company or who worked with the training department to develop an effective CRM training course? You see my point.

Any schmoe can fly an airplane. But if you want to stand out, do things that may or may not be aviation related, but show you as an individual with varied interests and abilities.
 

Polar742

All the responsibility none of the authority
First off, let's clarify that a resume is just a vehicle for conveying your qualifcations to a second party. Concentrate on developing your qualifications, not your resume.

My philiosophy in this regard is that it is not the number of hours or ratings that get you noticed, it is the range of experiences you have had. Everybody and his brother has an ATP and 1000 TPIC. But how many have experience as, say, a ground school instructor, chief pilot, or check airman? What looks more interesting to you? A guy who has spent the last 5 years and 4000 hours zipping around as an RJ captain, or someone who played an active role in bring ACARS online at his last company or who worked with the training department to develop an effective CRM training course? You see my point.

Any schmoe can fly an airplane. But if you want to stand out, do things that may or may not be aviation related, but show you as an individual with varied interests and abilities.
That's all true. There will be unique experiences and stuff not everyone does. If you have fun building your experience and do STUFF, it'll be a rewarding career and a good time. If you pigeon-hole yourself, as in any other career, if your niche goes away, you'll need to retrain or reshuffle.

I have a breadth of experience. A long-ass list of stuff I've done in a short time. However, no calls until I got about 6k, then I got several from good places. Too bad I can't express myself well in interviews.
 

falconvalley

Absentee Dad of the OOTSK, Runner, Cat Frustrator
Hi everyone, I am about to start my last year of college and wanted to do a bit of research about what airlines like to see on resumes and what applications will better one's chances of getting picked first.

My long term goals would be to fly for a fractional such as Net Jets, Flex, etc. Any of the nice majors would be nice too but I really like the idea of flying biz jets around the world.

I got some advice from a fellow worker to 'stick with it'. In this industry seniority is everything, so changing companies every year or two doesn't do much good.

I plan on getting my CFI and doing that gig for a while but if anyone could shed some insight on what to stay away from too, that would be a big help! Thanks in advance!
IMHO, minus all the career track stuff, the resume itself should be tailored to who's going to read it. For the longest time, I put out a "plain jane" resume (no offense to anyone named Jane...I happen to like the name), with about all I could cram in. Then one day, a friend shot a resume of mine back and said "give me a different version...make your name big and put your times after that and list a couple good flying jobs...only one page please...they're in a hurry to hire. After that I became real sensitive to understanding what hiring officials are looking for. Honestly, they're all looking for something different. That being said, it's not always what you've been doing, it's what you're doing right now! It's about being in the right place at the right time, with all the other requirements met. Get those hours and you'll be fine. Try not to step on too many toes! Oh, and seniority only determines your pay and who gets what seat from what I understand. Other than that seniority means jack squat (sp?). Joe/Jane Chief Pilot doesn't care if you're #1 on the seniority list at Delta Airlines. All he/she wants to know is can he/she stand the sight of you in the cockpit with him/her. Get on with someone, get your PIC and decide what's for you. Stay? Leave? It doesn't matter what you're seniority is unless you plan on staying. I was halfway up the list at Skyway and a captain and look where I am now. No one gives a darn what my seniority was there! It's the experience and attitude that counts.
 
Top