Biennial Flight Review

azaviator08

New Member
Do instructors have to get a biennual flight review? I got my CFI last march. So I should not need a review until 24 calendar months from then right? Also I am at a 141 school. Does my annual 141 check count as a flight review?

Does anyone know where I can find this information in the reg's?
 

Berkut

Well-Known Member
Do instructors have to get a biennual flight review?
Having a flight instructor certificate does not exempt you from the requirement for a flight review.
I got my CFI last march. So I should not need a review until 24 calendar months from then right?
Only if you happened to do a flight review at the same time.
Also I am at a 141 school. Does my annual 141 check count as a flight review?
Don't know about that one. Doubt it though.
Does anyone know where I can find this information in the reg's?
14 CFR 61.56
 

Douglas

Old School KSUX
Far/AIM -
Yes you need a flight review.
You do not have flight reviews for your CFI Certificate, that is a pilot thing only. You have to re-new you flight instructor certificate, not review it. That is why they mail you a second plastic card to carry around.

So if you want your Commercial pilot certificate to be valid, i would get a BFR. Also, don't try to self endorse, someone has tried that because there is a reg against that, believe it or not.

When you got your CFI certificate does not matter in regards to a flight review.
WHen was your last BFR? You will need one 24 months from then. If you completed a "pilot" check ride in the previous 24 months, that will count. An instructor check ride does not count as a BFR.
 

Douglas

Old School KSUX
Also I am at a 141 school. Does my annual 141 check count as a flight review?
Not unless you say, "hey dude, do you want to make this last for an hour and you sign my log book as a BFR at the same time..."
Since you are a current flight instructor and if and only if that certificate has been renewed at least once, you can forgo the hour of ground requirement via this reg.
61.56 (f) A person who holds a current flight instructor certificate who has, within the period specified in paragraph (c) of this section, satisfactorily completed a renewal of a flight instructor certificate under the provisions in §61.197 need not accomplish the 1 hour of ground training specified in paragraph (a) of this section.

Otherwise no, 141 school do not have an auto-BFR ability.

and
61.56 (d) (d) A person who has, within the period specified in paragraph (c) of this section, passed a pilot proficiency check conducted by an examiner, an approved pilot check airman, or a U.S. Armed Force, for a pilot certificate, rating, or operating privilege need not accomplish the flight review required by this section.

This one is a common mistake, but this is the reg that tells us we can not count our CFI check rides as a BFR, because it is not a pilot certificate. Like the other guy said, you can ask for a BFR at the same time though.

EDIT: sorry for sounding grumpy, I just got out of the movie Australia, it was honestly one of the worst movies I have seen in a while, and unfortunately, one of the longest too.
 

Stomp16

You mean Shennanigans?!?!
Douglas hit the nail on the head.....:yeahthat::yeahthat::yeahthat::yeahthat:
 

beechpilot

Well-Known Member
Your CFI check ride DOES reset the clock on your BFR. You will need to do a BFR 2-years from your CFI checkride.
Or if you happen to renew your CFI by retaking the checkride. In any event, a checkride given by the FAA or a designated flight examiner resets the clock on when you need to take your BFR.
 

Sidious

Well-Known Member
Your CFI check ride DOES reset the clock on your BFR. You will need to do a BFR 2-years from your CFI checkride.

Ummm Negative. Reread what Douglas wrote above. Its a common misunderstanding but one that needs to be known.
 

MikeFavinger

Hubschrauber Flieger
To be picky, it's no longer called a "biennial flight review," it's called a "flight review." ;)

CFI does not count because it is not a "pilot proficiency check" per the FAA.

Here is the FAA's letter of interpretation on the subject dated Feb 7, 2008.

Note in the letter it says the person administering the CFI practical test has the discretion to evaluate the pilot for a flight review at the same time. In short - if you want your CFI practical test to also count as a flight review, specifically ask your examiner to evaluate you for a flight review as well nd make a seperate sign off.
 

beechpilot

Well-Known Member
These points are valid and it's unfortunate that I learned otherwise, but I definitely see why the instructor check ride would not count. Matter of fact, I asked the local DE(has 30 years experience) this morning this very question and was told it would count. So, it seems that pilots of all experience levels are seemingly misinterpreting this one. Fortunately for me, I have an annual 135 ride so I'm covered nonetheless.
 

beechpilot

Well-Known Member
Now the question I have is what is an operating privilege? It seems rather vague and I couldn't seem to find much information about what the FAA means here.
 

Blip16

Well-Known Member
it is easy to figure out; a CFI ride is for Instructor Privileges, not PILOT privileges.
 

beechpilot

Well-Known Member
it is easy to figure out; a CFI ride is for Instructor Privileges, not PILOT privileges.
No, I mean what are the specifics regarding operating privilege:

61.56 (d) (d) A person who has, within the period specified in paragraph (c) of this section, passed a pilot proficiency check conducted by an examiner, an approved pilot check airman, or a U.S. Armed Force, for a pilot certificate, rating, or operating privilege need not accomplish the flight review required by this section.

My feeling is that it means the ability to act as PIC under part 135/121, etc.
 

Douglas

Old School KSUX
that is what I am guessing they mean, 135/121 are something i have never been apart of.
But I assume that is what they mean.
 

MidlifeFlyer

Well-Known Member
No, I mean what are the specifics regarding operating privilege:

61.56 (d) (d) A person who has, within the period specified in paragraph (c) of this section, passed a pilot proficiency check conducted by an examiner, an approved pilot check airman, or a U.S. Armed Force, for a pilot certificate, rating, or operating privilege need not accomplish the flight review required by this section.

My feeling is that it means the ability to act as PIC under part 135/121, etc.
Pretty much. It's really just English - something you are allowed to do that you wouldn't be allowed to do without it.
 
Top