American and Delta Drop Out Of ASAP

TristarJS30

Well-Known Member
Comair also withdrew from the program after the company began parallel investigations and used them against a pilot(s).
 

Derg

New Arizona, Il Duce/Warlord
Staff member
Apparently, "someone" decided to abuse the system to go after someone so the deal was off.
 

georgetg

Well-Known Member
There's also the issue of legal jeopardy

In the context of the program data cannot be used for enforcement actions.

What happens when in the course of a criminal investigation all pilot records get subpoenaed and stuff you thought was "off the record" ends up biting you...

NASA reports in turn are de-identified and thus safer...

Cheers
George
 

SteveC

Really?
Staff member
***********************************
NTSB PRESS RELEASE
***********************************
National Transportation Safety Board
Washington, DC 20594

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: January 28, 2009
SB-09-04

***********************************
NTSB PLEASED WITH DELTA'S DECISION TO REINSTATE ASAP

**********************************

Washington, DC - The National Transportation Safety Board is
pleased that Delta Air Lines has reinstated its Aviation
Safety Action Program (ASAP).

Under ASAP, pilots, mechanics, and dispatchers receive
immunity from disciplinary action when they voluntarily
report any safety-related incidents.

"ASAP is a major component to aviation safety," said NTSB
Acting Chairman Mark V. Rosenker. "We are hopeful that
other carriers, who have recently suspended their ASAP will
also see the importance and value of these programs and
quickly reinstate them," he added.

The Safety Board believes that proactive safety programs,
which encourage voluntary disclosure of safety issues, are
critical to ensuring aviation safety and identifying
problems before they lead to accidents.

The memorandum of understanding signed between the carrier,
the Air Line Pilots Association and the Federal Aviation
Administration will identify and correct safety issues, and
prevent accidents.
 

Bandit_Driver

Gold Member
So Now what happens. Delta agreed to play nice for awhile? or is there something new in this that will protect the crews more?
 

sopdan

Well-Known Member
Well, from what I've heard, NWA was pretty keen on ASAP... we were having some issues w/ our mgmt at XJ about it and it was in danger of getting dropped... to the point that the union was advising us not to file reports until the issues got resolved. Word is that NWA told our mgmt in a joint ASAP meeting that they'd better do what it takes to keep ASAP. (I can only speculate as to what the "or else" would've been)
 

Nick

Well-Known Member
Well, from what I've heard, NWA was pretty keen on ASAP... we were having some issues w/ our mgmt at XJ about it and it was in danger of getting dropped... to the point that the union was advising us not to file reports until the issues got resolved. Word is that NWA told our mgmt in a joint ASAP meeting that they'd better do what it takes to keep ASAP.
Correct.

Northwest's NASAP program, at least in 2005, consistently brought in more reports weekly than the same program at other carriers. Sometimes 150-200 in a week would come in -- not because NWA pilots are constantly screwing things up, but because the program never, ever goes after a pilot that is within the bounds of the program.

I remember one ERC meeting where a few people from another large airline's ASAP committee were sitting in and they were in shock as to how many reports NWA receives, as were their FAA CMO guys.

Hopefully the mentality that the company has with the program can continue as the two airlines become one.
 
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