Air Wagner

NovemberEcho

Dergs favorite member
Yeah...I don't think being eye level with the towers is "1000 feet above" the populated obstruction.
honest question, what exactly defines “above” as it related to this scenario? I mean technically he was never actually above the bridge iirc, just near it.
 

Minuteman

“Dongola”
honest question, what exactly defines “above” as it related to this scenario? I mean technically he was never actually above the bridge iirc, just near it.
Trap sprung!!

The FARs include lateral boundaries to the obstacles. Its up to you and your union/AOPA lawyer if you want to argue with the Administrator if those are cylindrical or spherical volumes.

14 CFR § 91.119

(b) Over congested areas. Over any congested area of a city, town, or settlement, or over any open air assembly of persons, an altitude of 1,000 feet above the highest obstacle within a horizontal radius of 2,000 feet of the aircraft.

(c) Over other than congested areas. An altitude of 500 feet above the surface, except over open water or sparsely populated areas. In those cases, the aircraft may not be operated closer than 500 feet to any person, vessel, vehicle, or structure.
 

ChasenSFO

hen teaser
honest question, what exactly defines “above” as it related to this scenario? I mean technically he was never actually above the bridge iirc, just near it.
I guess...but NorCal has asked me "You're not planning on getting much closer to the bridge, right?" when I was way further from it and higher up than him LOL so...
 

Murdoughnut

Well sized member
Jerry, if it is you, you could impress the hell out of the pilot world by publicly shifting your mindset. In fact, you'd become infamous for turning it around in the best way possible. Here are the steps:
  1. I realize now that I was making some mistakes, and wasn't always receptive when other pilots pointed it out
  2. Like everyone, I want to continually improve my flying skills each and every day
  3. I'm committed to having an open and receptive mind to criticisms or observations of my flying
  4. I'm going to dedicate time on my videos to calling out mistakes I've made in the past and how I'm purposely changing my flying based on that feedback.
Become the best turnaround story in GA history, and the model for how we ALL should crosscheck our flying abilities/habits.
 

KLB

Well-Known Member
Jerry, if it is you, you could impress the hell out of the pilot world by publicly shifting your mindset. In fact, you'd become infamous for turning it around in the best way possible. Here are the steps:
  1. I realize now that I was making some mistakes, and wasn't always receptive when other pilots pointed it out
  2. Like everyone, I want to continually improve my flying skills each and every day
  3. I'm committed to having an open and receptive mind to criticisms or observations of my flying
  4. I'm going to dedicate time on my videos to calling out mistakes I've made in the past and how I'm purposely changing my flying based on that feedback.
Become the best turnaround story in GA history, and the model for how we ALL should crosscheck our flying abilities/habits.
We all make mistakes while flying every once on a while. The important thing is to identify and fix them...and don't post them for the world to see.

Oh and if Jerry is reading this,

Declutter your flightdeck. Redundancy is good. But you appear to be extremely distracted by all the toys you have up there and it is taking away from your scan which makes your flying very sloppy. Focus on flying the airplane and less on unnecessarily swiping through devices. Familiarize and brief your approaches ahead of time while in the cruise phase of flight when your workload is low rather than reading and doing while on the approach.
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
honest question, what exactly defines “above” as it related to this scenario? I mean technically he was never actually above the bridge iirc, just near it.
You were thinking 119(d)(1). :)

119(b)(c). Another set of numbers I don’t need to pay attention to anymore.
 
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