Air Traffic Control Dress Code

moulds80

Well-Known Member
Does anyone know the general dress code for Air Traffic Controllers? It seems like in pictures and on TV they are often dressed professionally in Tower positions, but often in street or casual cloths when working the radar stations.
 

Delta Romeo

New Member
Since the imposed work rules (with the exception of midnight shifts), you must wear business casual. For guys thats easy. Just go buy several pairs of dockers and polo shirts. Dress shoes are required, no athletic style shoes permitted. Socks, while not specifically mentioned...are a must, as many facilities have sent people home for less. No hats. I would also (espicially while you are new and on probation) recommend that you wear your shirt tucked in and a belt.

Prior to the IWRs, anything was okay.
 

Justin538

New Member
That's not so bad. I guess if I was getting a negotiation I'd at least shoot for jeans, but I say go for the money before you go for the dress code.
 

scongdon

Well-Known Member
Not to turn this thread bad, but I STILL don't see why people are in a fuss over this. Again, if the dress code was a James Bond tux every day, I'd still do it.

I guess in the big picture, a dream career for me that is, "what I'm going to wear" seems like the least of my concerns.
 

pm577

New Member
Not to turn this thread bad, but I STILL don't see why people are in a fuss over this. Again, if the dress code was a James Bond tux every day, I'd still do it.

I guess in the big picture, a dream career for me that is, "what I'm going to wear" seems like the least of my concerns.
Well I can see the point of these old-head controllers.
At my current job I can wear whatever I want... if suddenly I had to conform to a dress code then I would be mad indeed.

Plus, sneakers are much more comfortable than dress shoes. Shouldn't a controller be as comfortable as possible?
 

FAA_ATC

Well-Known Member
Not to turn this thread bad, but I STILL don't see why people are in a fuss over this.
The FAA implemented a dress code so to not "erode public confidence".

Was public confidence in question or in danger of being "eroded" BEFORE Sept 2006?

Should your surgeon be required to wear a polo shirt and khakis under his scrubs while performing his duties?

I certainly would feel better about the service provided if he did. :whatever:
 

scongdon

Well-Known Member
Ok, agreed, I'd much rather be comfortable at work. I was just saying that -I- consider a dress code a small price to pay to work as a controller.
 

scongdon

Well-Known Member
Does anyone know the general dress code for Air Traffic Controllers? It seems like in pictures and on TV they are often dressed professionally in Tower positions, but often in street or casual cloths when working the radar stations.
Again, I'd dress especially nice if I knew the TV crews were coming, too. :D
 

Delta Romeo

New Member
When the FAA came in and mandated the change, you would have thought the sky were falling. I do not agree about how they did it, but I understand why they did it. You should have seen some of the butts (holes in the back of pants), and cutoff shorts, and "Toggs Sex Wax" T-shirts with flip flops that my fellow controllers were wearing. Had we (as a group) simply kept it neat and appropriate, rather than pushing it to the extreme, maybe we wouldn't be where we are today.

Having said that, the dress code of business casual isn't really a big deal, espicially if your a man. For women its a bit more pricey and complicated, as we can't get away with wearing Dockers, a polo, and the same pair of penny loafers every day.
 

Delta Romeo

New Member
Dress Shoes - if they're scandals, they must have a heel. Dress slacks, skirts, casual shirts with collars, or dressy blouses, sweaters without collars are okay, dresses. Its just not as "easy" or as "cheap" for women.

If you work in a Tower, remember that you may have to climb the stairs frequently. Our elevator (in a 2-year new facility) goes out all the time -18 triple-stories (AF tells us at ATL, each floor-level is the same as 3 floors in a normal building) worth. The FAA does not care, you are still not allowed athletic shoes. Also, most stairwells are not climate controlled and simply have hard concrete or metal stairs. The reason I mention this, is that for womens shoes, pick wisely based upon possibly having to ascend/descend the stairs on occassion.
 

BoomerSooner77

New Member
Ok, agreed, I'd much rather be comfortable at work. I was just saying that -I- consider a dress code a small price to pay to work as a controller.
This is going to maybe sound nutzoid... but if I have to wear dressier clothes and shoes, ESPECIALLY having to tuck my shirt in... I get so fidgety because I am TRULY sooo uncomfortable. I have somewhat of a hard time focusing because Im tugging at my shirt / belt / pants / feeling the blisters from my 'dress' shoes.

I hate to say it, but I am gonna have to go with the lower standards of the dress code or I am going to have learning issues. (Cargo pants / square bottom polos made of brushed cotton or silk mix untucked / ankle high dress shoes)

I know.. it seems so damn stupid, but it's always bothered me.
 

propcircles

New Member
Dress Shoes - if they're scandals, they must have a heel.
i love a good scandal!

This is going to maybe sound nutzoid... but if I have to wear dressier clothes and shoes, ESPECIALLY having to tuck my shirt in... I get so fidgety because I am TRULY sooo uncomfortable. I have somewhat of a hard time focusing because Im tugging at my shirt / belt / pants / feeling the blisters from my 'dress' shoes.
Not nutzoid, just a little whiny... look, I hate dress clothes too, but when you *have* to wear them, you get used to it. Also it IS possible to be very comfortable in dress clothes and dress shoes.

Not sure what else to say, except I can tell you from experience that when you have to wear dress clothes, you DO get used to it.
 

chichi

New Member
Dress Shoes - if they're scandals, they must have a heel. Dress slacks, skirts, casual shirts with collars, or dressy blouses, sweaters without collars are okay, dresses. Its just not as "easy" or as "cheap" for women.

If you work in a Tower, remember that you may have to climb the stairs frequently. Our elevator (in a 2-year new facility) goes out all the time -18 triple-stories (AF tells us at ATL, each floor-level is the same as 3 floors in a normal building) worth. The FAA does not care, you are still not allowed athletic shoes. Also, most stairwells are not climate controlled and simply have hard concrete or metal stairs. The reason I mention this, is that for womens shoes, pick wisely based upon possibly having to ascend/descend the stairs on occassion.
Thanks for the reply :)

:banghead::banghead::banghead:

That's all I have to say
 

Barty

Well-Known Member
Not to turn this thread bad, but I STILL don't see why people are in a fuss over this. Again, if the dress code was a James Bond tux every day, I'd still do it.

I guess in the big picture, a dream career for me that is, "what I'm going to wear" seems like the least of my concerns.
Eh, I've been used to dressing like that for years now. So its nothing new for me. Yeah, it would be nice if I could dress down for once, but its not a huge deal for me.

It isn't difficult to find comfortable shoes that have the appearance of being dress shoes these days. My current work shoes are really built like a sneaker, but look like a "business casual" loafer on the outside. I can walk in them all day long and they don't bother me. Get a couple of jobs walking a couple of miles a day back and forth a manufacturing facility and you learn how to pick comfortable "dress" shoes since we weren't allowed to wear sneakers on a regular basis.
 
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